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Capstone Projects

Food Allergies, Dietary Restrictions, and the Foodservice Industry

Thu, 12/03/2015 - 22:59
Abstract: For modern culinary professionals, food allergies and restricted diets present one of the biggest challenges in daily work. Ranging from an anaphylaxis-triggering peanut allergy to a preference for avoiding meat on Fridays, dietary restrictions and food sensitivities cover a wide variety of potential hurdles, and potentially inspirational guidelines, which foodservice professionals must navigate in order to be successful. On one side, a rise in the number of those with allergies or dietary restrictions presents an added challenge, but on the other, it presents an opportunity. Diners with such restrictions are becoming more and more comfortable with going out to dinner; that there will be some accommodation is now expected by consumers, rather than hoped for. The definition of “food allergy,” according to the Mayo Clinic, is “an immune system reaction that occurs soon after eating a certain food.” However, according to many experienced foodservice workers, the definition is “an annoying request from a customer who’s probably lying, anyway.” Of the many challenges contemporary chefs, culinarians, and food service professionals face, food preparation and service for those with allergies and restricted diets is one of the most prevalent, as well as one of the most misunderstood. Foodservice professionals will tell you that some of the most [annoying, silly, overblown, difficult, frightening] requests they receive while working are for special adjustments to accommodate a food allergy. When a chef is asked if the signature pasta dish can be made without gluten, his reaction is too often a mix of ire, disgust, and even embarrassment. Should a patron make a simple request that his or her food be prepared away from peanuts, images of anaphylactic shock and ambulances in the parking lot dance demonically through the front-of-house manager’s head. Such requests, however, seem to be popping up more and more often in our world. According to the CDC, “The prevalence of food allergies among children increased 18% during 1997-2007.” About 15 million Americans suffer from food allergies, as well as about 18 million Europeans. With such a rapid increase in those numbers, one would think the opportunity to impress customers with special diets might make a chef happy, rather than feeling as though he has been offended. The patience of chefs grows thinner still, however, when such requests are not a matter of health, but a matter of preference. For those who, for various reasons, adhere to a vegetarian or plant-based diet, or who follow certain religious dietary restrictions such as Islamic Halaal, finding a restaurant where the staff is ready and willing to accommodate can sometimes be difficult. For contemporary food handlers, ethics and morality play a massive role in serving such customers. A vegetarian diner, for example, may not know that the house minestrone soup is made with chicken stock in place of vegetable stock. Even after eating the soup, that customer will likely never know. In such situations, the decision to serve certain foods comes down to how much respect for his or her customers a chef has. It is my belief that the largest contributing factor towards the negative feelings chefs harbor over dietary restrictions is a lack of education and experience in handling such requests. Things unknown have always been a source of anxiety for a majority of human kind. That anxiety is why we are explorers and innovators; we subconsciously want to make things known. In order for foodservice professionals to handle the large number of diners who now request special items, it is necessary that they be educated from the earliest stages of their careers to expect, to accept, to interpret, and to enjoy working with those types of challenges. By doing so, the food and beverage industry will be a much more friendly world for all consumers, and a much more profitable one for all industry professionals.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Nathaniel Swain

Cheese

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 17:05
Abstract: This culminating experience happens in two phases. Throughout the semester, students have been taking on the role of Executive Chef in our Palm Restaurant. They have each created a menu, ordered food supplies, developed budgetary proposal, and assigned duties pertaining to food production and front of house service. Each dinner took on a different food related theme that the students researched and developed. This poster session provides the students to describe their process, their findings, and what they learned from the experience. My theme was based on cheese.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Lisa McCartney

Potato

Thu, 05/07/2015 - 09:17
Abstract: This Casptone includes exhilarating information about the multiple species of tubers. It goes in depth about the multiple uses of the potato and all of the nutrition of each species.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Potato
Authors: Nicole Landry

A Taste Of Legumes

Sat, 05/09/2015 - 20:00
Abstract: This capstone investigates the history and use of legumes over the years. Contained within you will find information about the agricultural and culinary importance of these plants.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: KIC%20Document%200001-5.pdf
Authors: Elizabeth Savoie
Sat, 05/09/2015 - 20:00
Abstract: This capstone investigates the history and use of legumes over the years. Contained within you will find information about the agricultural and culinary importance of these plants.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: KIC%20Document%200001-5.pdf
Authors: Elizabeth Savoie

Extreme Local: Weighing the Financials of Growing Produce On-Premise

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 16:31
Abstract: Restaurant owners across the United States create revenue by limiting their food costs. As the demand for locally grown, organic produce rises, these individuals find it increasingly difficult to offer these comparatively expensive ingredients without raising prices or facing an increase in food cost percentage. This study aims to discover the financial benefits and risks of growing organic produce on-premise, an alternative to buying these ingredients. Comparing the cost of gardening to the perceived value of its product, a financial analysis will assess the return on perfectly ripened, fresh ingredients. The findings will be used to determine the viability of small scale on-premise gardening in any small to medium sized restaurant.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2011
File Attachments: Brandon Bills Capstone.docx
Authors: Brandon Bills

How Local Can You Go?

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 17:01
Abstract: With the ever-increasing interest in and utilization of locally sourced products in food-service establishments, it makes sense for the “green”-striving Paul Smith’s College to bring these efforts to the dining room. The St. Regis Café claims, “We buy local when ever possible and support our regional agriculture as a standard professional practice.” This project will determine to what extent this claim is followed through on, while taking into consideration the required standards of the learning environment in the St. Regis Café. By establishing contact through e-mail with selected farmers and producers, this research will explore what percentage of the menu items could be sourced within a certain region. The resulting information will provide the St. Regis Café with the basis of information regarding product availability, should they be interested in pursuing this option.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2011
File Attachments: Capstone project.docx
Authors: Kelcey Rusch

Self-Actualization through the use of Food

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 17:16
Abstract: Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs is a table consisting of human needs according to necessity; in order to reach a new level, needs of the previous level must be met first. Among the physiological needs located at the bottom of the pyramid, is food. Food can be controlled unlike other biological needs and therefore may play a crucial role in reaching the ultimate goal of self-actualization. The surveys will be conducted to gather statistics and opinions of outdoor recreationists and other professionals who pertain to this study. The question that is going to be answered through this capstone is: Is food preparation and consumption an enriching and exciting enough experience to achieve self-actualization?
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2011
Authors: Stephanie Curtis

Accommodation for the Deaf culture in hotels and recreational facilities

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 18:18
Abstract: Hotels and recreational facilities do not always have adequate accommodations, to help the Deaf culture communicate with the hearing world and take advantage of special services. Hotels and recreational facilities are improving their accommodation but more can be done to meet the needs for this demographic. This study will research what services are already available for the Deaf culture in hotels and recreational facilities. The outcome will determine what the Deaf culture prefers in accommodations, what hotels and recreation facilities offer, and new accommodations. This will help not only the Deaf culture, but everyone by breaking the language barrier between hearing and Deaf. The Deaf culture can benefit by utilizing new technology to have a more enjoyable experience at hotels and recreational facilities.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2011
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Virginia Schertel, Allison Moscato

Cheers To Upscaling Beer With A Cicerone

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 18:53
Abstract: The Cicerone Certification Program has been around only since 2007 but has already given out thousands of Certified Beer Server certificates. The Cicerone Certification Program seeks to ensure that consumers receive the best possible beer and enjoy its flavors to the greatest extent possible. Those who are qualified must know five areas of beer. These areas of knowledge are beer storage, sales and service, beer styles and culture, beer tasting and flavors, brewing ingredients and processes, and pairing beer with food. The program offers three levels of certification beginning with the simplest and building to the most complex and demanding. The three levels of a Cicerone are Certified Beer Server, Certified Cicerone, and Master Cicerone. This study seeks to determine if a Cicerone is needed in an upscale restaurant. The opinion of beverage managers’ will be gathered through the use of interviews. The consensus will be used to determine if it is even worth having a Cicerone in upscale restaurants.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2011
File Attachments: Capstone-Project.docx
Authors: Stephen Angrisano