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Capstone Projects

The Rolling Pin

Mon, 05/11/2020 - 02:50
Abstract: For my capstone I created my business "The Rolling Pin". The Rolling Pin is a bakery solely focused on cannabis infused goods located in Denver, Colorado. The Rolling pin business plan includes everything from budgets, to employees, to menus. It is a grab and go establishment for anyone over the age of 21. Tourism in Colorado in recent years have seen major spikes, making this location perfect for a business of this type. I managed to learn much more about a lot of interesting aspects than I expected while researching for different parts of this project. I hope anyone who reads this capstone will find that same joy!
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
Authors: Amy Gonzalez

Baby Rach's Bakery

Sun, 05/10/2020 - 23:26
Abstract: For our capstone project, the assignment was to create a business plan and create our ideal bakery. Every little detail was to be planned out to create a successful business. We were to create a name, logo, and menu for our bakery. Baby Rach’s Bakery specializes in miniature treats, and catering for young children. I learned a lot about what it takes to run a business, and what it would cost for me to start my own bakery.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
Authors: Rachel Michaels

Cuyler Diner

Sun, 05/10/2020 - 22:33
Abstract: For capstone, I had taken an already existing business and made it my own. I had to research the current business plan of the diner and decide what direction I want to take the diner in, this meant I had to look at what is currently in the restaurant, the demographics, the atmosphere, and what expenses it would take to make the restaurant mine while still maintaining the current loyal customer base.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
Authors: Johnathan Wood

Rocky's Baking

Sun, 05/10/2020 - 17:23
Abstract: For our capstone we were to create a business and create a business plan for it. We also had to create three signature items for our business, mine was the Maple Bacon Bourbon Buns, Peanut Butter Whiskey Balls and Tiramisu Cupcakes. For my capstone I created a diner called Rocky's Diner and Bakery that is located in Lake George,NY and would be open year round. Due to this capstone I learned a lot about running a business and what it takes to get one started.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
Authors: Amber Rockwell

Umami

Fri, 05/08/2020 - 13:48
Abstract: Information about Umami
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
Authors: By: Vera Fatta

Fusion Confusion

Wed, 05/06/2020 - 10:27
Abstract: Fusion cuisine is confusing is a statement and a question. The question half of it is a double-edged answer. Fusion is in itself simple but, when applying it to food, the idea can get muddled. To fully understand the meaning of this we will have to take a deeper look at the history behind food itself. Afterall knowledge is to be built on a strong foundation, much like food.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
File Attachments: Capstone Profolio.docx
Authors: Shawna Gomez

Vegetarian and Plant-Based Food

Tue, 05/05/2020 - 10:01
Abstract: Serving Vegetarian and Plant-Based food in a Restaurant
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
File Attachments: Finished Capstone .docx
Authors: Abigayle Brietzke

Food Sustainability

Sun, 05/03/2020 - 22:50
Abstract: The purpose of my research was to find and use the various methods of food sustainability. That meant participating in the local farmers market and getting to know the community and sustainable practices. This research also gave me the chance to look at different cultures and practice of whole animal cooking, how they give back to their environment. This became more than just putting food on the plate, it's about how we get it there and what was done to accomplish that. What can we do in a modern era to keep sustainability alive and keep our stomachs full? Hopefully I was able to line out the few suggestions in my paper.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
File Attachments: Joe's Research Paper.docx
Authors: Joseph Martin

The Lower St. Regis Lake Shoreline: Understanding the Past, Analyzing the Present, and Recommendations for the Future

Sat, 05/09/2020 - 11:54
Abstract: Continuing shoreline research and restoration planning will help Paul Smith’s College adhere to their own missions and visions including experiential learning, improving students' lives, and maintaining an ecological conscience as a community.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Ecological Restoration, Environmental Sciences
Year: 2020
Authors: Zoe Plant, Thomas Firkins, Julie Capito, and Benjamin Marshall

Food Allergies, Dietary Restrictions, and the Foodservice Industry

Thu, 12/03/2015 - 22:59
Abstract: For modern culinary professionals, food allergies and restricted diets present one of the biggest challenges in daily work. Ranging from an anaphylaxis-triggering peanut allergy to a preference for avoiding meat on Fridays, dietary restrictions and food sensitivities cover a wide variety of potential hurdles, and potentially inspirational guidelines, which foodservice professionals must navigate in order to be successful. On one side, a rise in the number of those with allergies or dietary restrictions presents an added challenge, but on the other, it presents an opportunity. Diners with such restrictions are becoming more and more comfortable with going out to dinner; that there will be some accommodation is now expected by consumers, rather than hoped for. The definition of “food allergy,” according to the Mayo Clinic, is “an immune system reaction that occurs soon after eating a certain food.” However, according to many experienced foodservice workers, the definition is “an annoying request from a customer who’s probably lying, anyway.” Of the many challenges contemporary chefs, culinarians, and food service professionals face, food preparation and service for those with allergies and restricted diets is one of the most prevalent, as well as one of the most misunderstood. Foodservice professionals will tell you that some of the most [annoying, silly, overblown, difficult, frightening] requests they receive while working are for special adjustments to accommodate a food allergy. When a chef is asked if the signature pasta dish can be made without gluten, his reaction is too often a mix of ire, disgust, and even embarrassment. Should a patron make a simple request that his or her food be prepared away from peanuts, images of anaphylactic shock and ambulances in the parking lot dance demonically through the front-of-house manager’s head. Such requests, however, seem to be popping up more and more often in our world. According to the CDC, “The prevalence of food allergies among children increased 18% during 1997-2007.” About 15 million Americans suffer from food allergies, as well as about 18 million Europeans. With such a rapid increase in those numbers, one would think the opportunity to impress customers with special diets might make a chef happy, rather than feeling as though he has been offended. The patience of chefs grows thinner still, however, when such requests are not a matter of health, but a matter of preference. For those who, for various reasons, adhere to a vegetarian or plant-based diet, or who follow certain religious dietary restrictions such as Islamic Halaal, finding a restaurant where the staff is ready and willing to accommodate can sometimes be difficult. For contemporary food handlers, ethics and morality play a massive role in serving such customers. A vegetarian diner, for example, may not know that the house minestrone soup is made with chicken stock in place of vegetable stock. Even after eating the soup, that customer will likely never know. In such situations, the decision to serve certain foods comes down to how much respect for his or her customers a chef has. It is my belief that the largest contributing factor towards the negative feelings chefs harbor over dietary restrictions is a lack of education and experience in handling such requests. Things unknown have always been a source of anxiety for a majority of human kind. That anxiety is why we are explorers and innovators; we subconsciously want to make things known. In order for foodservice professionals to handle the large number of diners who now request special items, it is necessary that they be educated from the earliest stages of their careers to expect, to accept, to interpret, and to enjoy working with those types of challenges. By doing so, the food and beverage industry will be a much more friendly world for all consumers, and a much more profitable one for all industry professionals.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Nathaniel Swain