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Capstone Projects

Creating a Reliable Surveying Network: Does Adding New Survey Control Points to Paul Smith’s College Campus Enhance its Current Network?

Tue, 12/05/2017 - 18:48
Abstract: The goal of the project was to improve the current geometry of the Paul Smith’s College surveying network. Four new survey control points were added to the current network allowing for new connectivity to old control points. Previously, there was a Westside network and an Eastside network that were not connected and by connecting these two networks, it has expanded the current network further into the campus. Two different methods were used to help identify the new network. A traditional survey method, a closed traverse, was used to connect the old control points to the new control points by utilizing a Nikon DTM-352 series total station. A X90 OPUS GPS unit was used to connect the new control points into a geodetic network. After the data was collected a least squares adjustment was done to the closed traverse to correct for error within the traverse. The GPS data was processed by Topcon Tools utilizing a Continuously Operating Reference System (CORS) to obtain a better level of accuracy for the network it produced. The two different techniques used produced different results in the overall survey networks and supplied different coordinates than what has been previously used by students at the college. These results gained from the project are not of a consistent level of precision and are not recommended for use without conducting more closed traverses to increase precision within the network.
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Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy, Surveying Technology
Year: 2017
Authors: Frederick C. Petzoldt, Michael S. Thompson

Tiny houses for families

Tue, 05/02/2017 - 20:54
Abstract: Houses have changed in size and style over the centuries. We looked at tiny houses and research the economic and social benefits and issues with raising a family in a tiny house. We limited the family to four and made our house 800 square feet. We looked at case studies of families who are currently raising a family in a tiny home to find out what they say their problems may be. We found many unexpected benefits in our research. Many families believe that aside from the economic benefits, raising a family in a tiny home forces the family to be close and to communicate with each other. We interviewed a contractor, Harry Gordon, who gave us information in the building of sustainable housing. There was also a survey we conducted from the Paul Smith’s Community. The survey gave us data on the amount of people who were willing to raise a family in a tiny home. In our results, we found that for those willing to try to raise a family in a tiny house, it is very feasible.
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Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy, Natural Resources Sustainability Studies
Year: 2017
Authors: Kimberly Yager, Sandra Esparza

An examination of sustainable agricultural practices of small scale dairy farms in the Adirondack North Country of Upstate New York

Mon, 05/01/2017 - 09:14
Abstract: This study examines the sustainable practices of small scale dairy farms in the Adirondack North Country of Upstate New York. The results of this study can assist farmers in developing and implementing sustainable agriculture practices specific for small scale dairy farms in the North Country. Methods for research include farm tours as well as in person interviews with the farmers which will provide an understanding of what farming practices are currently being implemented as well as identifying what potential practices may be implemented. The information that is gathered can also be helpful with legislative processes. It may provide law makers and various agencies with valuable information that can help create guidelines and regulations that support sustainable farming methods as well as assist farmers in understanding their challenges and successes in reaching both economic and environmental sustainability
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Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2016
Authors: Steven Vincent

White-tailed Deer Browse Preference: A Comparative Study of the Catskill and Adirondack Mountain Regions, New York State

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 14:23
Abstract: Abundant white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in New York State, United States, affect forest regeneration and stand composition through feeding (browse) pressure. White-tailed deer browse preference of six different hardwood tree species in two mountain ranges, the Catskill and Adirondack Mountains, within New York State were compared in order to determine the extent of browse selection by deer. There were no statistically different browse selection by white-tailed deer within the Catskills or Adirondack study area or between each study site. Visual analysis of the study areas after concluding the study revealed that red maple (Acer rubrum) was the preferred browse species at each study site.
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Major: Biology, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Title, abstract, TOC , Report
Authors: John MacNaught, Blaine Kenyon, Mark Staats, Travis Boucher, Noah Finlayson-Gesten

HOS 462 Hospitality Business Simulation-OceanView

Sun, 05/03/2015 - 12:20
Abstract: This capstone was a business simulation where student managed and operated an online hotel and restaurant. OceanView was managed and operated by Kadie Ouellette, Ashlee Doele and Veronika Vanisheuskaya. OceanView is located on the beautiful shores of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The reports in this file are the first year business plan, yearly analyses and final business plan.
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Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: HOS 462 OceanView.docx
Authors: Kadie Ouellette, Ashlee Doele, Veronika Vanisheuskaya

Spring 2015 HOS 462- Final Capstone Submission

Mon, 05/04/2015 - 10:54
Abstract: Capstone Project: Our Capstone Simulation Course entailed running a Hotel Property out of Cape Cod Massachusetts. We had to make decisions as a group in order to execute and track the results of how our property was performing on a monthly basis. Our Business Model was targeted more towards business travelers. The following is our Analysis of how our property performed each Year throughout the Semester.
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Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Capstone-Final Submission
Authors: Rebecca Forman, Victor Dickson, Wyatt Gressler

HOS 462 Hospitality Business Simulation

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:57
Abstract: We as students in this course have been systematically redeveloping and managing a large multi-departmental hotel. This computer-simulated activity has given us the opportunity to achieve success through creative analysis to solve economic, social and environmental problems. The consequences of these decisions are reported and subsequently analyzed over a 3 year cycle of business. During our Capstone Celebration we have presented our results in a poster session and then provide a summative boardroom discussion of those internal and external forces and decisions that most powerfully affected our group’s successes, failures and adoption of change. This Paul Smith's College capstone experience has also allowed us to finalize our Paul Smith's education by giving us the opportunity to demonstrate mastery of the general education core and programmatic learning objectives. We have also had the chance to apply skills, methodologies and knowledge learned during our courses of study, building on this undergraduate learning experience as we evaluate our readiness for the next stage in our professional development.
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Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2015
Authors: Nicolas Gonzalez, Lydia Kieffer, Luis Escala

HOS 462 Hospitality Business Simulation - Blue Diamond

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 16:25
Abstract: Over the course of the semester, our capstone class took on the role of General Manager of a hotel through a business simulation. Each month, decisions were made based off on financial reports and key performance indicators. This report is the result of the decisions made from Year 1 to Year 3. They include business plans, business analyses, editorial calender, and RFP documents.
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Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2015
Authors: Amanda Middleton, Katrina Furuta, Matthew Bailey

Comparison of Industry Standard 5/16” Maple Sap Tubing Versus 3/16” Maple Sap Tubing Regarding Overall Yields for the 2014-2015 Maple Syrup Season at Paul Smiths College Visitor Interpretation Center, Paul Smiths, New York.

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 20:17
Abstract: Obtaining the highest yields during a growing season has long been the utmost interest by maple syrup producers across the northeast. Methods have been introduced such as different tubing sizes starting at 7/16” tubing to the industry standard 5/16” tubing, however recently the newest tubing on the market is 3/16” tubing. Theoretically the new 3/16” tubing would provide the highest overall yields in comparison to 5/16” tubing by increasing the amount of vacuum present under a natural gravity system. The study of examining the flow of maple sap between two tubing types consists of two sugar bushes located at the Paul Smiths College Visitor Interpretation Center in Paul Smiths, New York in the Adirondack Park. The two sugar bushes were constructed on similar landscapes providing the same of the following I.) Slope, II.) Size of trees, III.) Growing conditions, and IV.) Number of taps. Measurements of canopy cover and tree diameter were also compared to determine the overall health of both plots. The analysis showed that both canopy cover and tree diameter were less in 3/16” tubing however more sap still was produced in 3/16” tubing. The test compared 5/16” tubing versus 3/16” tubing in regards to overall seasonal yields. The overall seasonal yields for both 3/16” and 5/16” were measured in gallons from two separate locations. 3/16” tubing yielded more overall, ending with a total volume collected of 324.75 gallons of sap, while the standard 5/16” tubing yielded 296.5 gallons.
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Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
Authors: Joshua Brewer

A More Sustainable Computer

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 09:36
Abstract: The idea of a more sustainable computer has been looked at before by Fitzpatrick et al (2009). The project relooks at the idea and expands on it, discussing the production of a sustainable computer by larger companies for everyday household use. By putting together a computer in a compact oak casing, with minimal wiring, plastic and metal use, the project shows how you can make a budget friendly sustainable computer. An important part about sustainability is reusability. The availability of part reuse and recycling is also looked into to be able to make the most out of what has to be used. The results show a way in which it is possible to make a budget friendly, design for environment (DFE) computer that could be sold for everyday household use.
Access: Yes
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Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: CAPSTONE.docx
Authors: William Ruger