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Capstone Projects

Event Planning and What It Takes

Wed, 04/30/2014 - 21:03
Abstract: The focus of this capstone was event planning. What goes into planning an event? A professional planner needs to think about the goals, the needs of the customer, type of event, food and beverage, facilities and risk. To plan and execute an event, one must determine the type. For example, is it a corporate meeting or fundraising function? A budget is needed for each event to understand what is affordable and what can be done. What type of risk is involved? A good planner needs to plan for the “what ifs” of an event. Technology has changed the event industry. There once was a time when guests of an event would be asked to turn off their cell phones. Now everyone uses their phones at events. People can Tweet live and use social media to increase the experience of events. Planners can use social media to boost their marketing as well. Once a planner has experience in the industry they can apply to become a Certified Meeting Planner or a Certified Special Events Professional. This certification shows that the planner is an expert in their field. This capstone was planning a business plan workshop at Paul Smith’s College. This event was designed to give students a chance to develop a business plan. Potential transfer students were invited to take part in the event. During the event the students had to create a new product to market along with current senior business students who acted as their mentors. Together, they came up with a business plan and had to give an elevator speech on the product to everyone. The winning team was chosen based on the marketing, taste and idea of the product. The event was considered a success by the visitors and the college.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management, Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Stephanie Dalaba

HOS 462 Hospitality Business Simulation Capstone

Mon, 05/05/2014 - 08:30
Abstract: This capstone was an simulation of the hotel business. The reports in this file are a business plan and analyses reports for the four years that we were asked to make operational decisions for. This class looks at everything involved with the operation of a hotel through the simulation of an fictional hotel that a group of students get to name and make all operating decisions for. Everything that has been learned through the time at Paul Smiths College is put to use when operating the hotel simulation.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2014
Authors: James Panza

Driftwood Suites and Conference Services

Mon, 05/05/2014 - 19:00
Abstract: These are the reports of the original business plan for Driftwood Suites and four year analyses of the Hospitality Business Simulation Course. Driftwood Suites and Conference Services is located on the beautiful shores of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. This property is located 30 minutes away from the nearest airport. Driftwood Suites and Conference Services is the perfect location for business travelers and leisure travelers. Driftwood Suites currently has 125 air-conditioned rooms, all with private bathrooms and is well equipped to accommodate business travelers which is the main demographic of the property. Surrounding the property is an enclosed garden and a 200 car parking lot adjacent to the hotel. The products and services at Driftwood Suites that are offered are a new conference center, business services, and quick check in and check out. This property has a data point for email and internet access, level three complimentary items, and level four in room entertainment. In addition to the existing services such as 24 hour front desk servicers, lobby lounge, a full service restaurant called the Shipwreck Restaurant with a total of 100 seats, and a Pub style bar called the Pearl Pub with snack services and an additional bar called the Sea Glass Bar.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Victoria Gonzalez

Impacts of Maple Syrup Production Programming at the Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretive Center

Tue, 04/29/2014 - 12:37
Abstract: Education and interpretation provides strategies and techniques to successfully communicate natural resource and environmental concerns. This research addresses the effectiveness of a community education project at the Paul Smith’s College (PSC) Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) in the Adirondacks of New York State. Educational programs regarding maple syrup production were designed and evaluated to determine their impact on the local community. The objectives were to offer skills education, raise awareness on a local resource, foster a connection to the land, and offer involvement in the VIC’s community maple project. The goal of maple education at the VIC is to educate the community in an attempt to encourage the growth of an underutilized sustainable local resource that community members can become involved in without degradation of Adirondack forests. Determinations were made using a survey questionnaire provided before and after the programs were performed. Based on the data collected the determination made is that the majority of participants that attended ultimately were interested in becoming involved in maple sugaring using to VIC as a gateway for maple sugaring, primarily as a hobby and outdoor activity. This research has aided in the determination that effective programming at the VIC results in encouraging the community to be involved in maple syrup production. With this determination the VIC will continue to perform the designed educational programs as a service to the community.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Integrative Studies, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2014
Authors: Thomas Manitta

A Healthier Lunch Line

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 19:57
Abstract: Unhealthy eating is an epidemic in America that is passing from generation to generation. It is becoming more crucial to find ways that can change eating habits at a young age due to the influx of marketing influences. This study will show whether educational marketing or aesthetic marketing is more effective on children’s food choices. The educational marketing will be implemented by interactive taste testing with the students, while the aesthetic marketing will be done by encouraging healthy eating with various wall illustrations and posters in the cafeteria. Both sets of data will be gathered before and after to be compared for effectiveness. Schools are currently struggling to find a way to encourage healthy eating with food that is appealing to a grade school student. If the presentation of food is part of a solution, then this study can help prove that simple changes to the cafeteria setting can reinforce children’s perception of health and help fight obesity and other health issues.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management, Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2011
Authors: Amiee Derzanovich, Morgan Horwatt

Promoting Conservation of Biodiversity in the Adirondack Park Through Understanding and Engaging Stakeholders

Thu, 02/09/2012 - 11:31
Abstract: Anthropogenic disturbance of natural environments has led to the widespread loss of native biodiversity and degradation of ecosystems. It is increasingly recognized that addressing this “biodiversity crisis” entails understanding the societal drivers of unsustainable patterns of use. Conservation psychology is a new discipline that specifically focuses on understanding the linkages between human behavior and action and promoting a healthy and sustainable relationship between humans and nature. In this project, we employed principles of conservation psychology with the goal of improving the efficacy and efficiency of conservation of biodiversity in the Adirondack Park (AP). To meet this goal we employed three specific strategies. The first of these strategies was the use of surveys to assess the values, attitudes, and actions different stakeholders have in regards to conservation of biodiversity in the AP. These surveys were disseminated via both direct mailings and online, and included 30 questions. Our second strategy was to use discourse analysis to create a dictionary of terms and phrases employed in a positive, neutral, and negative light in regard to conservation of biodiversity. This entailed analysis of 30 emic accounts derived from opinion articles written by stakeholders in the AP, as well as analysis of a number of etic accounts drawn from online sources. Our third strategy was to use conservation psychology literature to assess ways in which the presentation of information and peer-dynamics influenced the responses of stakeholders towards conservation of biodiversity. Using the combination of these three strategies, we were able to provide a holistic understanding of how different stakeholders in the AP perceive and act towards biodiversity conservation; identify language that can be used to illicit a more positive response from these stakeholders; and identify specific tools based on principles of psychology that can encourage more active and effective engagement in conservation of biodiversity by different stakeholders. Our research findings will allow groups focusing on promoting conservation of biodiversity in the AP to be more effective and efficient in their work in the future.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2011
Authors: Christopher Critelli, John Ghanime, Derek Johnson, Samantha Lambert, Justin Luyk, Matthew Parker, Robert Vite, Heather Mason, Jesse Warner, Ethan Lennox, Sarah Robbiano, David Mathis, David A. Patrick

Destination Marketing for Oneida County, New York: What's the Return on Investment?

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 17:26
Abstract: Tourism destinations, large and small, depend on visitors to stay in their lodging facilities, see their attractions, shop in retail stores, eat in restaurants and in general spend money in establishments within the region. In order to draw people to a destination and become potential customers, a marketing plan is essential. Once this marketing plan has been executed and has had enough time to show results, it is critical to find out how well your marketing is doing and what can be improved through a survey to your potential customers. This study will involve an examination of marketing practices used by Destination Marketing Organizations (DMOs) and how results are typically tracked using conversion studies. Using this secondary research, the study seeks to find out how well the marketing for Oneida County Tourism is attracting customers to the region. This conversion study will be done through surveys to people who have requested information about tourism in Oneida County in the past to Oneida County Tourism (OCT) within the past year. The results should determine what OCT is doing well, and what needs to be improved in their current marketing strategies.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2011
File Attachments: Capstone Project 1.doc
Authors: Courtney Petkovsek

Paul Smith's College Role: Should Paul Smith's College Provide a Culture Class For Students Studying Abroad?

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 18:15
Abstract: Successful college studying abroad experiences can be greatly enhanced if students take a few preparatory steps before leaving the United States. This study seeks to enhance the study abroad experience of Paul Smith's College students by exploring secondary research related to study abroad experiences and by conducting primary research of students’ study abroad experiences. The results of this study will serve as a justification for production of a guide for Paul Smith’s College students as they prepare for study abroad experiences. Results indicate that students prefer an orientation course prior their study abroad experience, as they feel this will help them get the most out of their time immersed in another culture.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2011
File Attachments: Final.docx
Authors: Keali Lerch

Wording Behind the Menu

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 20:14
Abstract: When it comes to menu designing there are many reviewers that range from the average person to a professional menu designer. When you are deciding to have your own restaurant you should choose what type of restaurant you want to be. A menu for a fine dining restaurant should have different words for the descriptions of the menu items compared to a causal restaurant or family restaurant. Many customers for a fine dining restaurant want the menu to have certain words on the menu such as local, organic or “fancier” words. Many restaurant guests are willing to pay for fine dining as long as it is good, the words you use on the menu can help make the dish sound good. There are some rules and guidelines that can help a restaurant owner make a successful menu based on the restaurant type. If a certain rule or guide line is not followed correctly then the restaurant and menu will be criticized by the reviewers. This study seeks to determine if the Taste Bistro at the Mirror Lake Inn in Lake Placid, New York has a menu that is worded to fit the type of restaurant the owners and the restaurant manager believe it is.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2011
Authors: Lindsay Mitchell

The VIC as a Teaching Aid

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 21:18
Abstract: Paul Smith’s College has recently acquired ownership of the Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) and its land. Paul Smith’s College offers many academic programs that closely align with events and learning opportunities at the VIC. The size of the student body and availability of learning resources are growing every year at Paul Smith’s College. The Facilities, Planning and Environmental Management class at Paul Smith College is an example of one class that is incorporating the VIC into their course. One of the group projects which students are completing in the classroom is a mock design of a kitchen and café in the existing main building of the VIC for everyday use as well as for events. This case study will determine if Paul Smith’s College’s hospitality students and professors are interested in utilizing the VIC as learning and working experience in their curriculum. The case study will also determine where in the curriculum the hospitality students and the professors see the VIC being incorporated. I will survey Paul Smith’s professors and students to see whether the VIC could be a beneficial learning tool for students, as possible hands on working experience.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2011
File Attachments: CAPSTONE FINAL COPY.doc
Authors: Kristopher P. Klinkbeil Jr.