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Capstone Projects

ECTOMYCORRHIZA’S INFLUENCE ON SEEDLING GROWTH

Tue, 12/04/2018 - 14:16
Abstract: Mycorrhizae play an important role in forest ecosystems through their symbiotic relationship with trees and root systems. Of the mycorrhizae, ectomycorrhiza (EM), specifically targets softwood species and some hardwoods. In this experiment, the results of a powdered EM inoculum and red oak (Quercus rubra L.), pitch pine (Pinus rigida Mill.), and red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) were evaluated during one growing season. The study compared a control of no EM and treatment with EM in seed grown trees in containers. Difference between heights of the treatment and control were recorded to see if the inoculum impacted seedling growth of the host species. Throughout this capstone the hypothesis states: An ectomycorrhizae (EM) powdered inoculum would influence pitch pine, red spruce, and red oak seedlings height and biomass for the duration of one growing season (April-Late August). Red oak control exceeded treatment in biomass but not height, and pitch pine and red spruce treatment exceeded control in height and biomass.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2018
File Attachments: finalreport_slinger.docx
Authors: Samantha L. Slingerland

Coarse Woody Debris Volume Following Conventional and Whole-Tree Harvesting

Tue, 12/04/2018 - 16:50
Abstract: Coarse woody debris (CWD) affects important ecological patterns and processes in the forest, including nutrient cycling, carbon stocks, wildlife habitat, regeneration dynamics, and hydrology. Timber harvesting practices have been shown to affect the abundance and distribution of CWD in forest stands. This study separates timber harvesting practices into two categories: conventional harvesting (CH), where only the main stem of trees and possibly some large branches are harvested, leaving branches, twigs, leaves, buds, and other plant parts to decompose on the forest floor, and whole-tree harvesting (WTH), which removes the entire aboveground portion of trees. I measured post-harvest CWD volume within recent patch clear cuts in Vermont, comparing results between CH and WTH. Conventional harvesting sites contained significantly more (p = 0.04) CWD volume (954ft^3/ac) than WTH sites (422 ft^3/ac). In other words, CH resulted in a post-harvest CWD volume 126% greater than the volume resulting from WTH. The most important difference was a wide discrepancy between treatments in decay class 2, which contained 66% of the total CWD volume. The increased reduction of CWD through WTH, especially when carried out over multiple rotations, may have negative effects on future site productivity, as well as richness and abundance of wildlife. The choice to employ CH or WTH may also affect the carbon balance, regeneration dynamics, and hydrology of forest stands.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2018
Authors: William (Bill) Musson

Antifungal activity of propolis, neem oil, and cedarwood oil against the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor on American beech

Fri, 12/07/2018 - 16:27
Abstract: Fungi are often considered the most destructive organisms to attack wood that has gone through the milling process, so developing compounds to resist decay are extremely important. Copper chromated arsenic (CCA) was an industry standard until 2003 when its use was restricted due to environmental concerns. Thus, research into environmentally friendly compounds has become more common. This study investigated which compound, propolis extract, neem oil, or cedarwood oil, would best preserve beech wood exposed to Trametes versicolor. Extracts for each of the compounds were prepared using denatured ethanol, and infused into wood blocks using a vacuum pump. Blocks were made of American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) and were 10mm x 20mm x 5mm in size. The blocks were subjected to a common white-rot fungal strain, Trametes (= Coriolus) versicolor (L.) Lloyd (1920), for six weeks. Overall, propolis and cedarwood oil treated blocks lost significantly less mass than both neem and control blocks, suggesting they have potential for use as natural wood preservatives, and could be used as cobiocides.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Final Capstone Report.docx
Authors: Adam Milenkowic, Timothy Otis

Engaging Visitors Of Glenview Preserve With Interpretive Signage

Fri, 12/14/2018 - 11:42
Abstract: Glenview Preserve is a Lowland forest and Field property that boarders the Bloomingdale Bog. Implementing an educational system at the preserve would lead to more public interaction that would guarantee support for the Adirondack Land Trust’s mission objectives. This approach would involve the development of an interpretive day-use site, interpretive programs and signs, and an outdoor education space. For my portion I will be investigating how the Adirondack Land Trust can construct interpretive signage that is weather resistant and provides valuable content. The quality of the content will be evaluated using the National Association of Interpretation principles of POETRY. These signs will promote ALT’s mission objectives by encouraging people to make a difference after their visit through well-constructed and entertaining information. Visitors will donate money to ensure that having an educational system at the preserve is a leading concern of the Adirondack Land Trust’s management plan for Glenview Preserve.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Integrative Studies, Natural Resources Conservation and Management, Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management, Parks and Conservation Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Tiffany Elizabeth Marie Clark

Student of Natural Resources and Conservation Management

Fall 2018 graduate of Paul Smith's College

PROPOSED DAY-USE SITE AT THE ADIRONDACK LAND TRUST GLENVIEW PRESERVE

Fri, 12/14/2018 - 15:43
Abstract: Glenview Preserve is a lowland mix deciduous forest that boarders the Bloomingdale Bog. The property would be a quintessential location for public engagement through a day-use site, which in turn would ensure future use and elevation of the Adirondack Land Trust and their mission objectives. Through the determined design goals and the predetermined ALT goals for the property a comprehensive blueprint has been presented. The proposed day-use site is predicted to increase the three essential services that communities in the Adirondacks thrive off of. Their economic value, health and environmental benefits, and their social importance streamlines with the ALT’s management practices and goals to provide a beneficial educational and recreational space for the community.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Parks and Conservation Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Nathan Smith

Opportunity Cost of Common Core Development: Analysis of Course Preparation in the Fall Mountain school system and the Saranac Lake school systems

Fri, 12/05/2014 - 13:44
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to identify the cost to a school of adopting the Common Core State Standards through the reallocation of a teacher’s time. This study compares two similarly sized school districts, Fall Mountain Regional and Saranac Lake Central. To obtain the information to do this study a survey was comprised and distributed to the teachers of the two school districts. The data was then used to determine the average cost for a teacher to redo their lesson plans to accommodate the new Common Core, and the opinions they have on the effectiveness of the Common Core State Standards, among other statistical data as a result of the aforementioned survey. The data will then be used to do a comparison of the two school districts to see how the Common Core has affected schools in different states and areas. Based on the results of this study a discussion will be made and recommendations for the future proposed.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2014
Authors: James Chamberlain

Dunkin Donuts or Starbucks An analysis of two competitors

Sat, 12/06/2014 - 12:18
Abstract: Abstract The purpose of this research is to find out exactly what the difference is between Dunkin Donuts and Starbucks. It attempts to show how the companies are run differently, as well as illustrating aspects that are not visible to the public. This research will include how the employees are treated differently along with what company is more popular with college students. Surveys will be sent out to Paul Smith’s College students, faculty and staff. Once the data is collected it will be analyzed to determine what company people choose more often and why. The data that is collected for this project will come from primary and secondary sources.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2014
File Attachments: capstoneproject.docx
Authors: Rebecca Raffan

Left Bank Cafe Take Out & Patisserie

Sun, 12/07/2014 - 21:30
Abstract: Left Bank Café, located in Saranac Lake New York, is expanding its business this winter opening Left Bank Take Out & Patisserie. The expansion’s inspiration is based on its historical French baking roots with the original business the Saranac Lake Bakery being in its location forty years ago and owned by the current owner’s father. In addition to well-known French croissants, éclairs, palmiers, and tartes, the Left Bank Café Take Out & Patisserie will feature regional, holiday, and traditional French pastries and desserts. For a snack “on-the-go” Left Bank Café Take Out & Patisserie will offer espresso, coffee, and unique cold beverages along-side hand held pastries. Left Bank Café Take Out & Patisserie hopes to bring back the ambiance of the previously established bakery with the sense of community and sharing. This business plan outlines the product offerings along with a detailed study of both the take out industry and the direct customer demographics, with an additional analysis of the competitive market that Left Bank Café Take Out & Patisserie will be entering.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2014
Authors: Anastasia Nichols

Hobo Travels

Mon, 12/08/2014 - 13:20
Abstract: Travel during and after college is an experience that many undergraduates and graduates look forward to. It provides an opportunity to travel the world and experience different cultures before they settle down in to a career. Many college travelers do not have discretionary income due to student loans and the cost of living. This capstone research project is determining the feasibility of a business providing low budget travel to the millennial generation. The business aims to differentiate from other travel companies by providing a flexible schedule in addition to a cultural learning experience at a low cost. To verify the feasibility of such a business, a complete business plan along with several itineraries will be created. From this analysis it will be determined whether or not such a business could generate profit to sustain itself and grow.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2014
File Attachments: Final Capstone.docx
Authors: Jacob Polfleit, Jack Mulvihill

Forest Succession's Effect on Soil Physical and Chemical Properties after Agriculture Abandonment

Mon, 12/01/2014 - 11:00
Abstract: Landscapes have been significantly altered by humans and replacing forests with agricultural crops is a major alteration humans have made. This landscape change has affected soils significantly. Agriculture practices can potentially have detrimental effects on soils. However, through the 20th century forest cover drastically increased in the United States through the recruitment of second growth forests as a result of agriculture abandonment. Forests reclaiming farm lands through forest succession can have a significant effect on recoveries in soil physical and chemical properties such as bulk density, soil strength, porosity and fertility. Therefore, the goal of this study was to investigate forest successions effect on soil physical and chemical properties after agriculture abandonment. Three specific hypotheses were tested: 1) Bulk density and soil strength will decrease while micro and macro porosity will increase as forests reclaim farm lands. 2) Soil carbon and available nitrogen will increase over time. 3) Soil pH will decrease and electrical conductivity will increase over time. These hypotheses were explored on abandoned agriculture fields in a chronosequence study on coarse loamy Inceptisols in upstate New York across a 60 year temporal scale. Data showed that total porosity, total carbon and available nitrogen increase while soil pH, bulk density, soil strength and electrical conductivity decline over time. These results support all three hypotheses except for the latter half of hypothesis number three. The findings of this study suggest that although agriculture may disturb soil properties, time coupled with forest succession can result in significant recoveries.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2014
File Attachments: Final Report.docx
Authors: Nathan Piché