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Capstone Projects

PSC Alumni Campground Campsite Firewood: Risks and Solutions

Mon, 05/11/2020 - 01:37
Abstract: The purpose of our capstone was to build a woodshed for the PSC Alumni Campground. Camping is one of the most widely participated recreational activities during the year, and has been a recreational activity in the Adirondacks for many generations. People who camp at times find It difficult to locate dry firewood or any firewood at all, so they bring their own firewood with them or continue to search for wood off established trails. Walking off established trails can kill plant vegetation or disrupt natural processes in the forest. My group and I decided a woodshed that holds 3 cords of wood for the Alumni Campground would allow campers to stop searching for firewood out in the forest and prevent campers from bringing their own firewood into the park and risking the spread of any invasive species. The woodshed dimensions were 5ft in width by 12ft long and 7ft at the highest point and 5ft in the back. With a few slight modifications, we spaced the floorboards 6in apart for more ventilation. Overall, due to the pandemic, we were unable to complete the entire woodshed.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2020
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Mitch Akowicz , Kyle Bond, Josh Campbell, Matt Frye, Alex Purdy

Glenview Preserve: Sustainable Farming Methods

Thu, 12/13/2018 - 12:05
Abstract: In 2016, the Glenview Preserve was purchased by the Adirondack Land Trust, with a goal to maintain and preserve the two agricultural fields on the property. The farmer that leases the two fields from the Adirondack Land Trust will have to use sustainable farming methods to farm the fields, so that the biodiversity of the fields and also the Bloomingdale Bog are protected. There are three different farming intensities, which are low intensity, medium intensity and high intensity. The farmer should use low intensity farming because if the farmer used high intensity the ecosystems that are present on the Glenview Preserve property would be severely impacted. The farmer will most likely maintain the current fields by mowing the fields with a mowing machine, which has negative impacts on the land such as soil compaction. With the types of soil that the agriculture fields have, it is advised that the current fields remain hay fields and that different grasses and legumes that benefit the farmer’s livestock are grown. The farmer that leases the property from Adirondack Land Trust will have to decide if they will use draft horses, modern haying equipment or a mix of both to harvest the hay fields. No matter which way they choose to harvest the hay fields they will have to be sustainable, be able to develop ways to preserve the grassland bird species and maintain the Adirondack hayscape.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2018
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Dustin Clark

Acidic Deposition in Adirondack Lakes: Episodic Acidification and Equilibrium

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 10:06
Abstract: Acid deposition has been a historic problem in the Adirondacks. Though after original mitigation attempts were deemed successful, funding for many acid deposition-monitoring programs in the area has been cut or eliminated, and much of the data that has been collected is now old and outdated. Newer data on this issue needed to be collected to determine if there truly has been recovery of Adirondack lakes. Through this observational experiment the pH levels of 18 different lakes scattered around the Adirondacks during winter were examined. The pH levels of the snow around the lakes were examined to determine the levels of acid shock. This data was compared to the historic data available and created a preliminary finding. This comparison helped determine that Adirondack water bodies could possibly be coming to a form of equilibrium as the pH levels are possibly returning to a resemblance of pre-disturbance conditions, which suggests recent legislation may have had measurable successes in the goal of reducing the acidification of Adirondack freshwater ecosystems.
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Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Timothy Johnston, Andrew Olcott

Tetrodotoxin- toxicity of red efts (Notophthalmus viridescens) based on predatory selection

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 09:33
Abstract: Predators and prey have been coevolving for millions of years; those that have more aggressive relationships undergo more extreme selection as they become paired in an evolutionary arms race. This selection must affect both organisms to truly be an arms race; a relationship that accurately fits these criteria is that of the Eastern Red-Spotted Newt (red-efts) (Notophthalmus viridescens) and the Eastern Hognose Snake (Heterodon platirhinos). Samples of tetrodotoxin (TTX) extracted from red-efts were used to analyze a potential relationship between the efts and resistant predatory species. The values acquired upon analysis of samples were recorded from a population of organisms in an area vacant of the hognose and can be compared to areas where both species reside. Samples came from eighteen red-efts in a wetland located in the southeastern portion of the Adirondack Park where there are no known populations of the hognose snake. These samples were processed using various ELSIA grade chemicals, a procedure that concluded with ELSIA assays applicable for comparison to a set standard. By performing this study we hope to attain data pertaining to tetrodotoxin levels in red-efts that reflect an environment which does not contain hognose snakes, presented in the form of low levels of the specified toxin.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Sarah Desrosier