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Capstone Projects

White-tailed Deer Browse Preference: A Comparative Study of the Catskill and Adirondack Mountain Regions, New York State

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 14:23
Abstract: Abundant white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in New York State, United States, affect forest regeneration and stand composition through feeding (browse) pressure. White-tailed deer browse preference of six different hardwood tree species in two mountain ranges, the Catskill and Adirondack Mountains, within New York State were compared in order to determine the extent of browse selection by deer. There were no statistically different browse selection by white-tailed deer within the Catskills or Adirondack study area or between each study site. Visual analysis of the study areas after concluding the study revealed that red maple (Acer rubrum) was the preferred browse species at each study site.
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Major: Biology, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Title, abstract, TOC , Report
Authors: John MacNaught, Blaine Kenyon, Mark Staats, Travis Boucher, Noah Finlayson-Gesten

"Adirondack Escapes" - Feasibility Study

Thu, 12/03/2015 - 15:55
Abstract: “Adirondack Escapes”, located on Osgood Pond in Brighton, NY, is a yurt-accommodation that offers an affordable rate and comfort. This accommodation will serve primarily as an overnight stay destination for those who like to visit the Adirondack Park. “Adirondack Escapes” would like to one day expand its guests, and potentially, house college students from the two college in the area.
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Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2015
File Attachments: NEW CAPSTONE DEC 3.docx
Authors: Jordan Merry

Student Health Services: A Feasibility Study for Expansion

Thu, 12/03/2015 - 15:20
Abstract: The problem and solution that this study proposes involves Student Health Services. The problem SHS currently faces is that the wait time to see the nurse on campus varies in length and at times it can take longer than a half an hour for the student to be seen. After in depth analysis and discussions with the SHS Director and sole nurse, the solution proposed is to hire a second nurse.
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Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2015
Authors: Abigail Bailey

Topaz Detailing

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 11:21
Abstract: Topaz Detailing plans to be the only mobile detailing presence in the northern Bergen County NJ area that people trust their cars with. Trust us how? Trust us in making their car look as good as or better than the day they drove it off the lot. The service that Topaz Detailing provides uses a very safe paint correction process that has been in used all over the world for many years. The process can be used to correct anything from holograms, swirl marks and shallow scratches in the clear coat of the car caused from daily driving and use of improper materials. Using this method by repeating certain key steps can remove up to 100% of the visible blemishes on the paint can be corrected while making the car look like new. The full paint correction process starts with a basic waterless wash with distilled water and lubricants to get rid of most of the contaminants. Second, the car will be clayed to remove the contaminants were not removed from the first step and that can’t be seen. Third, the car will be compounded with a dual action orbital polisher to remove most of the swirl marks and scratches, this step may be repeated as many times as necessary to achieve desired results. Fourth, the car will be polished with oils; this will give the car (especially darker ones) a high gloss as well as remove very minor swirl marks. Finally, the car will be given two thin protective coats of wax which helps improves appearance as well as act as a barrier that will protect the paint from the elements. This simple process is what automotive detailers around the world use. Short-term goals for Topaz Detailing would be to stay in business and expand our customer base so we can saturate the market in Northern Bergen County and surrounding towns. Long-term goals would be to expand the business and get a garage so detailing can be done in the winter months and on rainy days. Another automotive detailer will be hired to operate the van and still keep our business mobile. What makes Topaz Detailing special: as opposed to the competitors in the area, Topaz Detailing will be run out of a van. This gives the company a few specific advantages A) customers will find it more convenient that the detail shop comes to them B) they will not have to worry about getting the car they need to detail to the shop and find a ride back and C) customer will not have to waste any valuable time getting the car to a shop, we come to you!
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Topaz Detailing 2.docx
Authors: Karl Schubert

Effects of Reduced Turbidity and Suspended Sediment Concentrations on Macroinvertebrate Communities at a Restored Reach on Warner Creek

Fri, 05/01/2015 - 18:21
Abstract: A segment of Warner Creek, a tributary to the Stony Clove Creek in the Catskill Mountains of New York, was restored in 2013 to reduce concentrations of suspended sediment and turbidity caused by a localized mud boil erosion of a large clay bank. Before restoration, impaired water-quality from fine sediments may have adversely affected intolerant species of macroinvertebrates and their communities. This study compared macroinvertebrate assemblages from before (2011) and after (2014) restoration to determine if the restoration reduced concentrations of suspended sediment and turbidity sufficiently to improve the health of their macroinvertebrate communities. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) kick-sample methods were used to collect four replicate benthic invertebrate samples from Warner Creek and from a reference site on the Stony Clove Creek during August of 2011 and August of 2014. Four replicates of 100 specimens were identified to the family level from each replicate. The NYSDEC Bioassessment Profile scores and selected macroinvertebrate community metrics and turbidity and suspended sediment concentrations from a USGS stream gage downstream of the restoration both pre and post restoration were evaluated to test hypotheses that water quality and the health of macro-invertebrate assemblages differed post-restoration. Although some families at Warner Creek with low tolerance values were found to have increased post-restoration, it was also found that others with moderate tolerance values decreased. These types of fluctuations were seen in both years at both Warner Creek and the reference site, which makes it impossible to definitively say the impact restoration had on the macroinvertebrate assemblages one year post restoration. At this time it is obvious from the stream gage data that restoration significantly decreased turbidity and suspended sediment concentrations (SSC). Further collection of invertebrates and stream gage comparison is necessary to see if restoration does eventually impact the assemblage of invertebrates.    
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Final Capstone.docx
Authors: Noel Deyette

Interpreter's Guide to the Finger Lakes Trail

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 21:44
Abstract: Guidebooks help hikers to navigate trail systems and gain a better understanding of their surroundings. Many types of guides exist for popular long distance hiking trails such as the Appalachian Trail, the Pacific Crest Trail, and the Continental Divide Trail. The Finger Lakes Trail (FLT) runs 558 miles across the base of New York State, yet has very little associated literature. I hiked a 52 mile section of the Finger Lakes Trail from Ellicottville to Portageville in western New York. Using observations from the trail and related literature, I wrote an interpretive guide for this section. My FLT interpretive guide covers topics related to planning and packing for a multiday backpacking trip, natural history of western New York forests, the story of the development of the FLT system, and backpacking ethics. This work will help satisfy the human need to acquire knowledge and potentially enrich the experience of FLT hikers.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences
Year: 2015
Authors: Jennifer Maguder

Best Management Practices for Cultivating Cold-Weather Shiitake Strains in the Adirondack North Country

Fri, 05/01/2015 - 09:55
Abstract: Shiitake (Lentinula edodes) cultivation has become an important tool for private woodlot owners to diversify their income and manage their woodlots more efficiently and sustainably. Through the art and science of mushroom cultivation three strains of shiitake have been created for varying climates: Wide Range (WR), Warm Weather (WW), and Cold Weather (CW). This study proposes that CW strains would be most ideal for the Adirondack North Country because growing conditions now and in the future are nearly optimal. CW strains have a shorter fruiting period (spring and fall) than the WR and WW; therefore, the mushroom production potential of the CW is underutilized. In order to get maximum production of their logs, most growers use a method called shocking to induce fruiting with WR and WW; however, research has shown that shocking does not trigger fruiting in the CW strains; rather, CW strains respond to temperature fluctuations. Taking this into account, we’ve introduced a hybrid approach of growing CW shiitake, which combines outdoor and indoor cultivation techniques to best imitate that temperature fluctuation. Growing CW shiitake using a hybrid approach can be the best choice for small-scale growers who wish to extend their growing season into the winter months, thus opening new market opportunities. By conducting interviews with shiitake growers in similar climates and compiling and analyzing literature from other professionals, we have gathered data on log harvesting, laying yard conditions, moisture management, and lighting conditions and developed a best management practices guide for small-scale shiitake grower/woodlot owners in a northern Adirondack climate. Ultimately, growers could diversify their sources of income, provide incentive to manage their woodlots and most importantly learn how to effectively utilize CW strains through the winter months.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Studies, Forestry
Year: 2015
Authors: Brittney E. Bell, Evan M. White

The management of the Virunga Mountain Gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei) in the face of political instability.

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 10:09
Abstract: Located in one of the most war torn and corrupt regions on the planet is the Mountain gorilla. Discovered by western science in only 1902 this species population is estimated at less then 1000 individuals who are split into two distinct populations. The first is in the Bwindi impenetrable forest of Rwanda and the other is the focus of this management, which is located in Virunga National Park. Virunga has faced a myriad of political corruption, social disorder, and economic stability. Not only the battlefront for some of the worst human on human crimes in history, it has also been a refuge for millions of people escaping genocide for the past 20 to 30 years. This has led to this region having some of the densest human populations being 300-600 individuals per square kilometer. For these two reasons habitats have been destroyed, resources overexploited, and disease transmission has greatly increased. These factors are some of the main contributions to population declines of many species in this region, especially the mountain gorilla. This management plan will address four of the most influential negative impacts on the mountain gorilla population survival. These four are habitat loss, hunting and poaching, disease transmission, and the amount of civil unrest and war in the region. To successfully manage the gorillas there will b social, economic, political and biological factors that will be addressed to ensure the most complete management plan. The actions of this plan will be a blend working with local communities, the resources around them and the people using the resources. The most important actions that should be done first are to address the amount of deforestation and the establishment of reforestation programs.
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Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2015
Authors: Christopher Mattern

Management of Africanized Honey Bees (Apis mellifera scutellata) in the United States

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 10:06
Abstract: Africanized honey bees (AHB) are a hybrid species that the United States Fisheries and Wildlife Services classify as invasive. The species has spread at an alarmingly high rate since it was introduced to Brazil. AHB are a genetic cross between European and African honey bees. This hybridized species of bee exhibits increased rates of absconding, more aggressive and defensive behaviors, less selectivity in nesting sites, and higher swarming rates. The result of these behavioral characteristics is an increase in the number of stings per incident. Faster reproductive rates and shorter incubation periods allow AHB to invade EHB colonies and convert the genetic structure within a few weeks. AHB pose a threat populations of EHB which are already experiencing losses due to colony collapse disorder. Their tendency to colonize a wide range of cavities often puts them in immediate proximity to humans which poses a threat to the well-being of anyone who lives where AHB have colonized. The spread of AHB throughout the U.S. has had an impact on the beekeeping and honey industry due to apiculturists who are reluctant to expose themselves to the danger that accompanies this species. Declines in managed bee populations create problems for the agricultural industry as well which relies heavily on managed bee populations for pollination. Management plans have been established in many states and it is illegal to possess managed AHB colonies. Our goal is to decrease the rate of AHB dispersal by identifying and eradicating Africanized hives, and to distribute information on the species on a national scale by consolidating existing material and creating education opportunities in every state. Each action will be assessed to determine whether it accomplished the desired objective and adjusted to increase effectiveness. If adequate conservation efforts are not established in the U.S., AHB will likely have significant ecological and socio-economic implications.
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Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2015
Authors: Nathaniel Wells

Management Plan of Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) in New York State for Long Term Species Success (2015-2035)

Fri, 05/01/2015 - 17:27
Abstract: The goal of this management plan is to maintain populations of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) to prevent the extirpation of the species in New York State. Golden eagle in the eastern United States are generally an unmanaged species. Population estimates are broad, ranging from 1,000-2,500 individuals in the eastern range. Many of these eagles breed in northern Canada and may only be seen passing through the United States on migratory routes. This management plan outlines need for management, a primary goal, with objectives and strategies associated for golden eagle in New York State (2015-2025).
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Mng_Plan_FINAL.docx
Authors: John MacNaught