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Capstone Projects

Creating a Reliable Surveying Network: Does Adding New Survey Control Points to Paul Smith’s College Campus Enhance its Current Network?

Tue, 12/05/2017 - 18:48
Abstract: The goal of the project was to improve the current geometry of the Paul Smith’s College surveying network. Four new survey control points were added to the current network allowing for new connectivity to old control points. Previously, there was a Westside network and an Eastside network that were not connected and by connecting these two networks, it has expanded the current network further into the campus. Two different methods were used to help identify the new network. A traditional survey method, a closed traverse, was used to connect the old control points to the new control points by utilizing a Nikon DTM-352 series total station. A X90 OPUS GPS unit was used to connect the new control points into a geodetic network. After the data was collected a least squares adjustment was done to the closed traverse to correct for error within the traverse. The GPS data was processed by Topcon Tools utilizing a Continuously Operating Reference System (CORS) to obtain a better level of accuracy for the network it produced. The two different techniques used produced different results in the overall survey networks and supplied different coordinates than what has been previously used by students at the college. These results gained from the project are not of a consistent level of precision and are not recommended for use without conducting more closed traverses to increase precision within the network.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy, Surveying Technology
Year: 2017
Authors: Frederick C. Petzoldt, Michael S. Thompson

Tiny houses for families

Tue, 05/02/2017 - 20:54
Abstract: Houses have changed in size and style over the centuries. We looked at tiny houses and research the economic and social benefits and issues with raising a family in a tiny house. We limited the family to four and made our house 800 square feet. We looked at case studies of families who are currently raising a family in a tiny home to find out what they say their problems may be. We found many unexpected benefits in our research. Many families believe that aside from the economic benefits, raising a family in a tiny home forces the family to be close and to communicate with each other. We interviewed a contractor, Harry Gordon, who gave us information in the building of sustainable housing. There was also a survey we conducted from the Paul Smith’s Community. The survey gave us data on the amount of people who were willing to raise a family in a tiny home. In our results, we found that for those willing to try to raise a family in a tiny house, it is very feasible.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy, Natural Resources Sustainability Studies
Year: 2017
Authors: Kimberly Yager, Sandra Esparza

An examination of sustainable agricultural practices of small scale dairy farms in the Adirondack North Country of Upstate New York

Mon, 05/01/2017 - 09:14
Abstract: This study examines the sustainable practices of small scale dairy farms in the Adirondack North Country of Upstate New York. The results of this study can assist farmers in developing and implementing sustainable agriculture practices specific for small scale dairy farms in the North Country. Methods for research include farm tours as well as in person interviews with the farmers which will provide an understanding of what farming practices are currently being implemented as well as identifying what potential practices may be implemented. The information that is gathered can also be helpful with legislative processes. It may provide law makers and various agencies with valuable information that can help create guidelines and regulations that support sustainable farming methods as well as assist farmers in understanding their challenges and successes in reaching both economic and environmental sustainability
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2016
Authors: Steven Vincent

White-tailed Deer Browse Preference: A Comparative Study of the Catskill and Adirondack Mountain Regions, New York State

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 14:23
Abstract: Abundant white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in New York State, United States, affect forest regeneration and stand composition through feeding (browse) pressure. White-tailed deer browse preference of six different hardwood tree species in two mountain ranges, the Catskill and Adirondack Mountains, within New York State were compared in order to determine the extent of browse selection by deer. There were no statistically different browse selection by white-tailed deer within the Catskills or Adirondack study area or between each study site. Visual analysis of the study areas after concluding the study revealed that red maple (Acer rubrum) was the preferred browse species at each study site.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Title, abstract, TOC , Report
Authors: John MacNaught, Blaine Kenyon, Mark Staats, Travis Boucher, Noah Finlayson-Gesten

Comparison of Industry Standard 5/16” Maple Sap Tubing Versus 3/16” Maple Sap Tubing Regarding Overall Yields for the 2014-2015 Maple Syrup Season at Paul Smiths College Visitor Interpretation Center, Paul Smiths, New York.

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 20:17
Abstract: Obtaining the highest yields during a growing season has long been the utmost interest by maple syrup producers across the northeast. Methods have been introduced such as different tubing sizes starting at 7/16” tubing to the industry standard 5/16” tubing, however recently the newest tubing on the market is 3/16” tubing. Theoretically the new 3/16” tubing would provide the highest overall yields in comparison to 5/16” tubing by increasing the amount of vacuum present under a natural gravity system. The study of examining the flow of maple sap between two tubing types consists of two sugar bushes located at the Paul Smiths College Visitor Interpretation Center in Paul Smiths, New York in the Adirondack Park. The two sugar bushes were constructed on similar landscapes providing the same of the following I.) Slope, II.) Size of trees, III.) Growing conditions, and IV.) Number of taps. Measurements of canopy cover and tree diameter were also compared to determine the overall health of both plots. The analysis showed that both canopy cover and tree diameter were less in 3/16” tubing however more sap still was produced in 3/16” tubing. The test compared 5/16” tubing versus 3/16” tubing in regards to overall seasonal yields. The overall seasonal yields for both 3/16” and 5/16” were measured in gallons from two separate locations. 3/16” tubing yielded more overall, ending with a total volume collected of 324.75 gallons of sap, while the standard 5/16” tubing yielded 296.5 gallons.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
Authors: Joshua Brewer

A More Sustainable Computer

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 09:36
Abstract: The idea of a more sustainable computer has been looked at before by Fitzpatrick et al (2009). The project relooks at the idea and expands on it, discussing the production of a sustainable computer by larger companies for everyday household use. By putting together a computer in a compact oak casing, with minimal wiring, plastic and metal use, the project shows how you can make a budget friendly sustainable computer. An important part about sustainability is reusability. The availability of part reuse and recycling is also looked into to be able to make the most out of what has to be used. The results show a way in which it is possible to make a budget friendly, design for environment (DFE) computer that could be sold for everyday household use.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: CAPSTONE.docx
Authors: William Ruger

Tiny Houses: A Step Toward Conserving Natural Resources

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 13:45
Abstract: This project examines the potential to downsize America’s current living style in efforts to conserve natural resources and adapt to the changing world. The average home has increased to an excessive size over the years. As a result, abundant amounts of timber are desired, pollution is produced, and homeowners are buried in financial debt. A possible relief to these issues is the tiny home . Many tiny house advocates allegedly stated these structures require fewer materials to construct, lessening the need for natural resources. To confirm these ideas, a study was implemented through extensive research on small living, followed by a survey and the construction of a tiny house model. The results showed many American’s with large homes cannot justify the need for the excess space. Therefore, downsized to a tiny house may be a good choice for many citizens. These structures proved to require fewer materials at a more cost efficient price. So if the tiny house is both livable and affordable, what does this mean for the future of the tiny house?
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Capstone NRS 495
Authors: Tim Baker, Falon Neske

Presence and Abundance of Microplastics within Flowing Waters of Private, Wilderness, and Other Forest Preserve Lands of the Northern Adirondack Park

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 16:26
Abstract: Microplastic sampling was conducted at thirteen locations throughout the water bodies of the Northern Adirondack Region. Plastics were found at all thirteen sites, which were categorized by the impact level of human development. Any particle less than 5mm can be defined as a microplastic particle. Microscopic plastics can be found in a variety of chemical cleaners, clothing fabrics, and concrete solutions. Storm water drainage systems and wastewater treatment plants are confirmed sources of microplastic pollution, which carry pollutants into our rivers, lakes, and streams. Ingestion of microplastic particles can lead to many distinctive threats, including biological and physical abnormalities, while possibly leading to bioaccumulation and biomagnification throughout the food web. Future practices for management and prevention of microplastic pollutants in the Adirondacks is critical for environmental protection, while also portraying a worldly view of an overlooked human induced issue.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2014
Authors: Patrick Colern, Sinjin Larson

Python Scripting an ArcGIS Add-in for Wildlife Telemetry Data Processing

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 15:46
Abstract: There are currently no modern open source alternatives to commercial radio telemetry processing software. I developed a python add-in for ArcGIS which allows for interactive editing of telemetry data. The add-in was tested for functionality, accuracy and usability. Functionality was tested according to how closely it adhered to the original software requirements specification. Accuracy was tested by generating telemetry data from known animal locations and comparing the estimated locations to the actual locations. Usability was tested through speak aloud user tests. User data was collected on completion status, time of completion, and number usability issues found. The intended functionality goals were met and exceeded. Accuracy was less than expected with an average inaccuracy distance of 202 meters and approximately 10% of the bearing groups were unable to generate a centroid. During user testing, a total of 33 usability issues were discovered that hindered use of the software and on average it took a student 18 minutes to process one data set without prior exposure to the add-in. Qualitative observations from the user tests could be a launching point for GIS usability studies. In addition, the core modules could be modified and expanded into a separate application with dependency on Quantum-GIS or Geographic Analysis Support System (GRASS).
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2014
File Attachments: Kacir_2014.docx
Authors: Robert Kacir

Effects of Food Plots on (1) White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) Movement, (2) Antler Growth and (3) Potential Use by Other Wildlife on a Private 173 Acres in Davenport, NY

Mon, 12/02/2013 - 11:23
Abstract: In Davenport, New York, a 172.9 acre property is planning to undergo changes to suit a white-tailed deer management plan. This plan involves implementing four food plots of 4.25 acres, providing a year-long source of quality forage for the local deer herd, after initially clear-cutting 17 acres of forested land in spring 2012. Goals of food plot establishment are to supplement the value of the land as a hunting lease, increase viewing opportunities of deer, increase antler growth among bucks in the local deer herd, and to adequately supplement the diet of the local deer herd. This study focuses on the effects on (1) movement and (2) antler growth of white-tailed deer after the implementation of food plots on a forested property. Another component is the (3) potential for utilization of these food plots by other species of wildlife. Movement of deer will be assessed based on scat count, track count, and images of observed movement via trail cameras on travel routes. Deviation will be recorded from established travel routes, to new travel routes once the food plots have been implemented. The plot containing white clover showed the highest level of utility post-planting, followed by chicory, alfalfa and turnips.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2013
Authors: Nicholas K. Zemlachenko