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Capstone Projects

A Model for the Development of a Community Center for Psychology in a Rural Setting

Fri, 05/08/2020 - 10:31
Abstract: The current research proposes the development of a Center for “Psychology and Wellness” in rural communities. This research examines the importance of mental health resources for communities in general. In addition, it explores the need for a centralized hub for psychological resources where collaborations between local providers, academic institutions, and community organizations can be actualized. Special emphasis will be placed on the unique psychological needs of rural communities. This research will explore the rationale for such a model and identify specific stakeholders and community links within the North Country region of New York state. In addition, specific activities, potential collaborations, and educational training opportunities will be discussed. Finally, expected benefits, possible challenges, and next steps will be discussed.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2020
Authors: Dijon Bell
Kenneth Cornog
Abigail Cowan
Deven Rogers

Birding within the Alumni Campground

Mon, 05/18/2020 - 13:48
Abstract: With birdwatchers forming the largest group of tourist, they become potential candidates for improving the well-being of local communities by educating locals about the biodiversity of bird species and creating local and national incentives for successful protection and preservation of natural areas (Asefa, 2015). With this, there is potential for economic growth and visitor diversity to increase within the Alumni Campground in Paul Smith's, NY through bird-watching activities. This project will research the bird species found within the Alumni Campground to give visitors an understanding of the birding opportunities found during their camping experience. My research uses a hands-on approach for determining bird species (field research), rather than using citizen science experiments that rely on outside sources for determining bird species.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2020
Authors: Kara Coon

PSC Alumni Campground Campsite Firewood: Risks and Solutions

Mon, 05/11/2020 - 01:37
Abstract: The purpose of our capstone was to build a woodshed for the PSC Alumni Campground. Camping is one of the most widely participated recreational activities during the year, and has been a recreational activity in the Adirondacks for many generations. People who camp at times find It difficult to locate dry firewood or any firewood at all, so they bring their own firewood with them or continue to search for wood off established trails. Walking off established trails can kill plant vegetation or disrupt natural processes in the forest. My group and I decided a woodshed that holds 3 cords of wood for the Alumni Campground would allow campers to stop searching for firewood out in the forest and prevent campers from bringing their own firewood into the park and risking the spread of any invasive species. The woodshed dimensions were 5ft in width by 12ft long and 7ft at the highest point and 5ft in the back. With a few slight modifications, we spaced the floorboards 6in apart for more ventilation. Overall, due to the pandemic, we were unable to complete the entire woodshed.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2020
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Mitch Akowicz , Kyle Bond, Josh Campbell, Matt Frye, Alex Purdy

Creating the Paul Smith's College Alumni Birding Trail

Sun, 05/10/2020 - 13:37
Abstract: The Paul Smith’s Alumni Campground is a rustic retreat for Paul Smith’s College alumni and families. While the campground holds some guests throughout the seasons it is no secret that there are some things lacking. I took it upon myself to find a way to bring excitement to this campground while not drifting from the rustic natural setting. Creating a birding trail is something that not only fits the Paul Smith’s learning experience but also is a large attraction worldwide. With graduates in fish and wildlife to natural resource’s including on campus classes in ornithology this would be a perfect fit.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2020
File Attachments: final capstone paper.docx
Authors: Justin Gillen

A Land Ethic for the Anthropocene: Analyzing and expanding Leopold's Land Ethic

Thu, 05/07/2020 - 13:13
Abstract: Aldo Leopold’s Land Ethic has been revered in the environmental community since its creation in 1949 in Leopold’s, A Land Ethic. Leopold defines a land ethic as follows; “a thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of biotic communities and it is wrong when it tends otherwise”. Although this has been largely the definition accepted for generations, there are many criticisms about his Land Ethic specifically around the eco-centric views he presents within his essay. This project was put forth to expand and reanalyze Leopold’s claims to get a better working definition of a Land Ethic. Through interviews and surveys I was able to put together a cohesive ideas of local community members to get a working land ethic for Anthropocene we currently find ourselves. Keywords: Aldo Leopold, Land Ethic, Anthropocene
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2020
File Attachments: captone final.docx
Authors: Matthew John Merritt

Effects of Silvicultural Treatments on Wildlife Communities at the Paul Smith's College Forest Research Demonstration Areas

Fri, 05/11/2018 - 16:15
Abstract: Logging has drastically altered North American forest ecosystems for centuries. While extensive studies have been done to determine the impacts of different silvicultural practices on plant communities, minimal research has evaluated the impacts on wildlife communities, particularly in the Adirondack Mountains. Silvicultural practices may significantly impact wildlife communities due to the disturbances it causes, as well as the way it alters the habitat. We monitored winter wildlife communities in the Forest Ecosystem Research Demonstration Area owned by Paul Smith’s College in the Northern Adirondack Park. By analyzing the data collected by trail cameras, tracks and measuring percent browse, we compared the abundance and diversity of wildlife in three silvicultural treatments (i.e., clearcut, group selection, control). We also collected data regarding the physical aspects of the silvicultural treatment plot (i.e. canopy cover and snow depth) to indicate the kind of available habitat. We found that despite there being the highest average relative activity in group selection, there is no significant relationship between average relative activity and harvest treatment type. Using the Shannon-Weiner Diversity Index, we found that the highest diversity was in control/reference. Due to our limited treatment sample size, we did not have conclusive findings in most areas of our study. However, the highest total tracks and relative activity were found in the clearcuts. We suggest that more research be done on this study in order to eventually make forest management plans that properly account for both plant and wildlife species.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Biology, Environmental Sciences, Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Jacob Adams, Caitlin De Bellis, Tyler Fisk, Hyla Howe, Mark McHugh, Daniel Sutch

Feasibility Study of an Outdoor Classroom Area in Glenview Preserve

Fri, 12/14/2018 - 21:36
Abstract: The Glenview Property is 238 acres with a lot of potential. One of those potentials could be to create a sustainable education area for the public. The Glenview Preserve is known for its scenic view of the mountains, its lowland boreal forest, and its productive farmland. The Adirondacks are known for its forestry, agriculture, and open space recreation. The Adirondack Land Trust owns and manages this area. The ideal main uses of this property are agricultural, educational, sustainable outreach programs, and a balance between natural and artificial scenery (Adirondack Land Trust, 2017). Within the Adirondacks, where the beauty is breathtaking, recreation is at world-class level, and the land is environmentally protected, experiences are held in order to promote environmental awareness. With local resources and the natural growing land space, a sustainable education area can be built. Additional projects within the area includes an amphitheater, a kiln, and raised garden spaces.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2018
File Attachments: CapFinal.docx
Authors: Quinn Jordan

Engaging Visitors Of Glenview Preserve With Interpretive Signage

Fri, 12/14/2018 - 11:42
Abstract: Glenview Preserve is a Lowland forest and Field property that boarders the Bloomingdale Bog. Implementing an educational system at the preserve would lead to more public interaction that would guarantee support for the Adirondack Land Trust’s mission objectives. This approach would involve the development of an interpretive day-use site, interpretive programs and signs, and an outdoor education space. For my portion I will be investigating how the Adirondack Land Trust can construct interpretive signage that is weather resistant and provides valuable content. The quality of the content will be evaluated using the National Association of Interpretation principles of POETRY. These signs will promote ALT’s mission objectives by encouraging people to make a difference after their visit through well-constructed and entertaining information. Visitors will donate money to ensure that having an educational system at the preserve is a leading concern of the Adirondack Land Trust’s management plan for Glenview Preserve.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Integrative Studies, Natural Resources Conservation and Management, Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management, Parks and Conservation Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Tiffany Elizabeth Marie Clark

Student of Natural Resources and Conservation Management

Fall 2018 graduate of Paul Smith's College

Conservation Easements

Fri, 12/14/2018 - 23:16
Abstract: The privatization of land through conservation easements serve an important role of protecting biodiversity and ecosystem services across various landscapes. This research investigated the purposes of conservation easements, how they are acquired, and the importance of strong landowner relationships and yearly monitoring. Numerous peer-reviewed articles and websites were analyzed for this research in addition to interviews with three participants, each at different land trusts (Harris Center for Conservation Education, The Nature Conservancy, and the Adirondack Land Trust). However, despite the interviewees working at different organizations, the process of easement acquisition and overall thoughts on conservation easements were very similar. My own experience as a Conservation Easement Monitor was also applied to this research, and two examples of completed monitoring reports from my time at the Harris Center accompany this document. Furthermore, this study suggests the need of individuals becoming involved with conservation easements either through volunteering, interning, or having their property become an easement at participating organizations.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Nicole DeCarolis

The Glenview Preserve Management Plan

Fri, 12/14/2018 - 19:43
Abstract: Abstract: The 238- acre Glenview Preserve consists of forests and fields located within Harrietstown, NY. The Adirondack Land Trust has purchased this land in order to restore, protect, and improve the land while utilizing it to its maximum potential. Our study investigates the best possible ways to make their goals reality. We will be looking into detail on how we can encourage human activity while still protecting the beautiful land from poor human practices. We will also be discussing the best possible ways to improve the land for wildlife. Here we will go into detail on how to make improvements for both the forest and the bog, these modifications will help make the land more suitable for wildlife. Our final goal will transform this land into a wonderful creation where wildlife can congregate together by using the land in the best way possible.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Capstone .docx
Authors: Brandon Dummitt
Alex Meyer
Robert Lutz