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Capstone Projects

Planning and Future Management of the Adirondack Land Trust Glenview Preserve

Sat, 05/11/2019 - 08:51
Abstract: The Adirondack Land Trust purchased a 238 acre parcel of land, Glenview Preserve, from the Trevor family in 2016. The Glenview Preserve is located along New York State Route 86 in Harrietstown. The Glenview Preserve already consists of a heavily visited scenic vista of Whiteface Mountain, the McKenzie Range, and other Adirondack High Peaks. The property borders the Bloomingdale Bog, the third largest boreal peatland in New York State. The Glenview Preserve can be a perfect spot to incorporate a trail system to allow visitors the opportunity for non-consumptive recreational activities. When creating a trail system for recreation it is important to examine the impacts on local flora and fauna. A clearly designated trail system is the number one way to mitigate impacts on soil, vegetation, wildlife, and water created by visitors. Within the preserve interpretive signs will be implemented to educate and inform visitors on proper usage of the trail system. The unique thing with the area is the gradual grade of only 50 feet so the breathtaking views are virtually accessible to everyone who visits. Recreational activities allow people to get outside and enjoy nature and hopefully build personal environmental stewardship. The trail system will not only allow recreational opportunities for visitors but establish a sense of an outdoor community.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2019
File Attachments: Capstone_Murray 2019.docx
Authors: Payton Murray

Managing a Successful Bakery

Mon, 12/10/2018 - 16:15
Abstract: For this capstone we were given the responsibility of running the A.P. Smith's Bakery for eight weeks. These responsibilities included the management of student employees, and the creation of menus, production lists and ordering sheets.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Baking and Pastry Arts
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Final Capstone Paper.docx
Authors: Daniele Warner
Katelyn Aupperle

Lower St. Regis Lake Survey: A Comparative Study of Fish Population Structure and Function over Time

Thu, 12/13/2018 - 14:24
Abstract: Lake surveys are performed on bodies of water to provide a health analysis of fish populations over time. Lake surveys can be conducted in a variety of ways to attain specific data. Lower St. Regis Lake was surveyed to determine the fish community composition and to understand fish population traits. Using fyke nets placed at six predetermined locations for 24 hours, as well as fishing, we collected data for age, length (mm), weight (g), and parasites present. Data was analyzed in the lab using Excel to form graphs and tables to demonstrate our findings. Catch rates were lower compared to years before and comparing our data to New York State Department of Conservation data found that our length-at-age data was lower for the six-species sampled. Pumpkinseed and yellow perch were the only two species to have over twenty fish sampled. Decreased air temperatures brought in by a cold front during the week of our sampling may have been a reason for our lower number of fish caught. Mesh size is also a bias while using these nets as smaller fish can escape, and predatory fish can prey on smaller fish while in the net. Some species of fish such as black crappie may be more susceptible to capture due to its habit of associating with structure.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Environmental Sciences, Environmental Studies, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Capstone_Final.docx
Authors: Deacon Chapin, Jared Chlus, Louis Daversa, Jon Herrman, Robert Visicaro

A Comparison of Winter Wildlife Use of Minimally, Moderately and Highly Impacted Shorelines on Lower St. Regis Lake and Black Pond in the Adirondack Park, NY

Wed, 05/09/2018 - 10:51
Abstract: Continued development and human interference with freshwater shorelines creates a degraded environment and can negatively affect native wildlife along impacted areas. Throughout the Adirondack Park, shorelines have experienced substantial degradation with the development of lakeside summer homes. There tends to be a strong preference for the aesthetics that lakes offer, as well as the numerous recreational opportunities they provide. The increased human use of shorelines and the development of anthropogenic structures has directly resulted in the degradation of shorelines in the Adirondack Park. Likewise, the Paul Smith’s College shoreline along Lower St. Regis Lake has been subjected to degradation throughout the history of the campus. This highly impacted site was selected, alongside minimally and moderately impacted sites in the surrounding areas as representatives for different impact levels. Shoreline degradation includes a decline in the health and presence of natural vegetation, creating a decrease in available food source for native wildlife. The removal of natural vegetation creates a decline in shoreline stability with the removal of root systems, allowing for greater amounts of erosion to occur. Additionally, degradation decreases available canopy cover and increases exposure of wildlife to predation. The objective of this study was to determine the difference in wildlife activity and diversity between three levels of shoreline impacts: minimal, moderate, and high. It was expected that the minimally and moderately impacted shoreline sites would show a greater diversity and abundance of wildlife than highly impacted shorelines. Trail camera data was analyzed at three sites for each treatment on Paul Smith’s College property, along both the Lower St. Regis Lake and Black Pond. Although we detected no significant differences in either activity or diversity across the treatments, there was higher relative activity and diversity in moderately impacted shorelines than minimally or highly impacted. However, wildlife species that are more rare and/or area-sensitive, such as the fisher (Martes pennanti) and American marten (Martes americana), were only detected in the minimally impacted shorelines of Black Pond. A restoration of the highly impacted shoreline to reflect minimally and non-impacted shorelines of the surrounding region would allow for opportunities to improve habitat for native wildlife species.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Ecological Restoration, Environmental Sciences
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Shoreline Restoration
Authors: Tessa White, Caroline Matuck, Kasey Lane, Rosemary Bloodnick, Kyle Pasanen, Annalee Kraai

A Comparison of Terrestrial Invertebrate Communities among Impacted, Minimally Impacted, and Reference Sites: Implications for Shoreline Vegetation Restoration

Fri, 12/14/2018 - 12:19
Abstract: The problem that this study attempts to address is the possibility of terrestrial invertebrate communities being negatively impacted by man-made disturbances along shorelines. This is a relevant issue because terrestrial invertebrates play multiple key roles in an ecosystem such as pollinating and serve as a food source for both aquatic and terrestrial organisms. The objective of this study is to provide a preliminary observation of terrestrial invertebrate communities between impacted, minimally impacted, and reference conditions sites so that further research can be conducted and add another aspect to shoreline management and restoration decisions. The impacted and minimally impacted sites that were sampled were located along the shore of Lower Saint Regis Lake on Paul Smith’s College property. The reference condition site sampled in this study was located along the shore of Black Pond on Paul Smith’s College VIC property. Invertebrates were sampled using pitfall traps and sweep nets. The invertebrates were then identified by taxonomic family and preserved in vials of alcohol. The findings of this study may imply that there may be inverse relationship between insect populations and arachnid populations based on impact level. Due to seasonal conditions of the Adirondacks, the results of this study could have been influenced by weather conditions, so a similar study conducted during a different season may produce vastly different results. The information collected in this study can be used to determine shoreline restoration and management decisions in the future.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Final Capstone Report.docx
Authors: Ken Toepper, Isaac Stouffer, Quincie Grube

Homesteading for Beginners

Wed, 12/12/2018 - 14:51
Abstract: Homesteading isn’t just a movement, it’s a way of life. Our first research proposal was to create a guide to homesteading for beginners. Initial research showed there are countless types of homesteads and so we decided to research what homesteading is and the different ways you can homestead. Homesteading can be defined as a life of self sufficiency. But our research found that there can be many ways to achieve that goal.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy, Natural Resources Sustainability Studies
Year: 2018
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Ron Fina
Erica Martin

Product Feasibility Plan:Little ADK

Fri, 04/28/2017 - 10:35
Abstract: Little ADK’s is a take-home wilderness experience for children between the ages of 4-11. This is an oyster mushroom growing kit that will help a child bring the magic and wonders of the Adirondacks back home, outside the Blue Line (the term used to define the Adirondack Park Preserve.). This pod-based garden system allows children, as well as adults, the opportunity to grow their very own Adirondack native plants. Little ADK’s also comes with an informational booklet and an educational coloring book describing the importance and beauty of the Adirondack Park. Little ADK will be marketed to tourist within the Park as well as to native wilderness lovers. Those purchasing the product can feel environmentally conscientious as Little ADK’s donates 10% of profits toward the preservation of the Adirondack Mountains.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Entrepreneurial Business Studies
Year: 2017
Authors: Joshua R. Clemens

Assessment of Tree Planting Riparian Management along the Ausable and Boquet Rivers in New York State

Tue, 12/05/2017 - 14:28
Abstract: Ecological restoration is, in part, restoring degraded ecosystems. By adding riparian vegetation along degraded reaches of rivers and streams, ecologists can begin to restore the natural habitat and processes associated with that river or stream. Trees, shrubs and grasses can be very important in retaining stream bank soils, providing shade in the river and habitat for terrestrial species. Two programs called Trees for Tribs and Ausable River Association (AsRA), restore degraded riparian areas in the state of New York, including the Ausable and Bouquet Rivers in the Adirondack State Park. This study compared survival rates of the plantings in nine different locations along the Ausable River and one location along the Boquet River. The tree species, living status (survivorship), and stem density of the understory was recorded. The four AsRA planting sites and one U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service site planted saplings ranging from 6-8 feet in height, and the Trees for Tribs planted seedlings at the other five sites. It was found that there was no significant difference between the survival rates of the saplings in comparison to the survival rates of the seedlings (p-value = 0.37). In addition, there was no significant difference (p-value = 0.05) in the stem density measurements between sapling and seedling plots. It was also observed that records of tree plantings were either missing, incomplete or inaccurate from both Ausable River Association and Trees for Tribs.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences
Year: 2017
Authors: Austin Tremblay

Living Machine ® Wastewater Treatment in Sólheimar

Tue, 12/05/2017 - 15:02
Abstract: As of 2014, Sólheimar Ecovillage in South Iceland began to experience inadequate sewage treatment. After a large earthquake, the community’s constructed wetland became damaged, freely expelling untreated wastewater into the surrounding watershed. After research, the Living Machine® system became the evident solution to help mitigate this issue. By using a case study of a Living Machine® system in South Burlington, Vermont, I was able to determine output estimates of individuals by gallons per day (GPD) and approximate a price for a Living Machine® with a greenhouse at $1,019, 694 USD. Different approaches Sólheimar could take to help make this project successful would be installing a flowmeter, applying for different grants, charging tourists to use the restrooms, and contacting the engineering company to discuss the current and future piping system in the village.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences
Year: 2017
File Attachments: jsetter_final.pdf
Authors: Jessica Setter

A Comparison of Fall and Spring Minnow (Cyprinidae) Surveys to Assess Overwinter Changes in Community Composition in a Marshland of the Northern Adirondacks, NY

Wed, 12/06/2017 - 03:51
Abstract: Minnows are an integral component of a healthy aquatic ecosystem. However, minnows are very sensitive to habitat destruction and loss, changes in water quality, and over predation. As a result of its integral role, an unhealthy, or absent minnow population can wreak havoc on an ecosystem. The objectives are to compare minnow species richness and composition between spring and fall surveys for different regions in the marsh, compare minnow trap catch rates between fall and spring for each minnow species for different regions of the marsh, compare mean length of minnow species between fall and spring, and compare water temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and conductivity in the fall with that of late winter and post ice-out. The study location was Heron Marsh of New York’s Adirondack Park, which supports of variety of fish in the cyprinidae family. Water quality was collected using a YSI meter in all 4 seasons of the year, and minnows were sampled using galvanized steel minnow traps during the fall and spring. Nearly all sites saw an increase in cyprinid biodiversity and abundance. Long term monitoring should be established for more robust data that can in turn justify more solid conclusions.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences
Year: 2017
File Attachments: Capstone Report
Authors: Brenden Blair