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Capstone Projects

Would an underpass/tunnel on Keese Mills Road decrease the percentage of amphibian mortality due to road mortality?

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 18:09
Abstract: Road Mortality has had a huge impact on Amphibian populations worldwide. Several options are available to help maintain and preserve migrating populations across roadways. One method that is looked at during this study is underpass and fencing. In this study, I assessed the need for an underpass and if it could help reduce the amount of amphibian’s mortality by traffic and, if an underpass is necessary, properly predict a location. I also looked at if underpasses alone could reduce the mortality of amphibians. I constructed arrays and pitfall traps to simulate an underpass on Keese Mills Road at Paul Smiths and Santa Clara, Franklin County New York. I predicted that underpass would decrease the amount of amphibian being slayed. I also predicted that certain locations would have more usage then others. The results showed that there was no significant difference between the location of the sites and whether they would be used by the amphibians. The results also showed that there was no correlation between the species that were captured and the species that were killed.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Biology
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Jorge Velazquez

White-tailed Deer Browse Preference: A Comparative Study of the Catskill and Adirondack Mountain Regions, New York State

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 14:23
Abstract: Abundant white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in New York State, United States, affect forest regeneration and stand composition through feeding (browse) pressure. White-tailed deer browse preference of six different hardwood tree species in two mountain ranges, the Catskill and Adirondack Mountains, within New York State were compared in order to determine the extent of browse selection by deer. There were no statistically different browse selection by white-tailed deer within the Catskills or Adirondack study area or between each study site. Visual analysis of the study areas after concluding the study revealed that red maple (Acer rubrum) was the preferred browse species at each study site.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Title, abstract, TOC , Report
Authors: John MacNaught, Blaine Kenyon, Mark Staats, Travis Boucher, Noah Finlayson-Gesten

The Effects of Varying Wavelengths of Light on Diatom Movement

Wed, 05/06/2015 - 16:18
Abstract: Diatoms were studied in order to determine in which wavelength of light they would be most active. It was surmised this knowledge would allow easier testing of future diatom movement hypotheses. This knowledge could, in turn, allow control over diatom movement in order to prevent or circumvent hazardous diatom blooms. Specimens were studied using a Parco scientific microscope in a dark room. They were studied both with and without cover slips to ensure the cover slips did not hinder movement. Sheets of high quality color transparency paper were laid over the microscope light, producing a single, strong color. In the end, the diatoms didn’t move at all, no matter the circumstances. The diatoms could have had no reason for movement or have been restricted by the small amount of water on the microscope slide due to the vast difference between the slide and the diatoms’ natural environment.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Biology
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Diatoms.docx
Authors: Eric Swiecki

Examination of Potentially Ectoparasite-driven Behavior in Burrowing Owls: Tests of Alternative Hypotheses

Thu, 05/07/2015 - 19:06
Abstract: Burrowing Owls (Athene cunicularia) and their nests harbor at least 39 species of arthropods from 21 different families. Among the ectoparasites on Burrowing Owls are fleas, which are primarily Pulex irritans (Family Pulicidae), the human flea. Fleas can number in the hundreds on individual Burrowing Owls. Thus, we hypothesized that flea infestation has shaped Burrowing Owl behavior to avoid the costs of ectoparasitism. As part of experiments using infrared trail cameras deployed at Burrowing Owl nests in southern Idaho ¬¬during 2012-2013, we noticed apparent sunning behavior in both adult and nestling Burrowing Owls. Camera images captured owls lying on the ground with wings outstretched and flat. We only observed this behavior during daylight hours, although cameras were active for 24 h/day. Sunbathing in birds is often associated with ectoparasite reduction, although sunning has not previously been examined in relation to flea infestation. During 2014 we conducted an experiment that included fumigating some nests with a flea removing insecticide and examined the prediction that sunbathing would occur more frequently in control nests where ectoparasites remained. As sunning was not during the coolest parts of the day, it did not appear to function for warming. Also, we ultimately found no difference in the frequency of sunning in fumigated and control nests, and there was no relationship between sunning and abundance of fleas on owls. Thus, the evidence is not consistent with the ectoparasite hypothesis, as owls sunned irrespective of flea load. We also evaluated the alternative hypotheses that sunning was related to thermoregulation, anting, drying or feather degrading bacteria. The first three we were able to reject, and the last will need future research.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Skyler Wysocki

Initiatives to Increase Student Use of the Visitor Interpretive Center: A focus on marketing

Mon, 12/07/2015 - 09:18
Abstract: The focus of this study was on marketing the Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) to students and faculty with an overarching goal of increasing student use of the VIC. Through the study market research was conducted to identify the desired programming of the student body and methods of reaching students. Desired programs were then implemented and promoted alongside current programs. Program evaluations were conducted to assess the effectiveness of the marketing research and methods of promotion. Focus groups were held to allow a deeper insight on the preferences of different styles of promotion and the effectiveness of VIC brochures geared towards incoming students and faculty. The results of the study should be used in the future to increase communication between upper level management, and students and faculty regarding VIC resources and programming. The VIC is a resource for education, interpretation, and recreation that is underutilized and could be increasingly influential in the years to come.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2015
File Attachments:
Authors: Paige Buchholz

Removing Barriers: Student’s Use of the Paul Smith’s Visitor Interpretive Center

Tue, 12/08/2015 - 16:56
Abstract: The Paul Smith’s College’s Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) has been a staple in the lives of locals and tourists of the Adirondacks. The VIC offers nature-based recreational and educational programs year-round with the assistance of Paul Smith’s College’s students, faculty and staff. The purpose of this research is to take a deeper look into the present barriers preventing the Paul Smith’s College community (student, faculty and staff) from accessing and utilizing the VIC’s building and its trail system. A study was performed to discover barriers to accessing in the VIC area by utilizing surveys, focus groups, on-site visits, program implementation, trail register log, previous recreation capstones, and online resources. The results were analyzed to concentrate specific barriers. Most barriers involved programing, such as expanding current programs, as well as, offering new programs, followed by accessing the VIC, such as adequate signage and map interpretation, and finally access to general information, such as advertising and marketing. Using research from the past and present, this project gives suggestions that would better serve the PSC community by clarifying the needs and desires of the appropriate stakeholders associated with the VIC.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2015
Authors: Phillip Brandel

Looking Forward at Outdoor Recreational Opportunities at the Paul Smith’s Visitor Interpretive Center

Wed, 05/06/2015 - 10:57
Abstract: The Paul Smiths College Visitor Interpretation Center (VIC) has been a major contributor to the lives of locals and tourists of the Adirondacks. The VIC provides recreational and educational programs for the surrounding area to enjoy and learn from. It is located about a mile down Route 30 from Paul Smith’s College. The purpose of this research is to look deeper into the VIC viewing is past, present and possible future programing with regards to the art, invasive species, climate change, digital media and recreation. Using surveys, interviews, on site visits, previous related capstones and online resources a study has been done looking into the present and past to what the VIC could possibly unfold for future programing. The purpose of this capstone is to do an analysis of the Visitor Interpretation Center (VIC) in regards to recreation. To begin, we looked into the history of recreation in the Adirondacks as a whole to get some background information. We then did research on what recreational pursuits were offered in the past at the VIC, up to present day. Surveys were conducted and personal observations and interviews were done to get information on the current status of outdoor recreation at the VIC. Using information from the past and present, alongside of a needs assessment of the VIC, our project shows what is most desired for future recreational programing at the VIC. This information will be presented to stakeholders of the VIC for past reflections as well as ideas to move forward.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Full Paper.docx
Authors: Nathanial Casaregola, Steven Farrell

Monitoring the Zebra Mussel Invasion Front: Use of New Technology

Thu, 02/09/2012 - 15:39
Abstract: Zebra mussels are invasive mollusks that are affecting the well-being of the water bodies in the United States. This study uses environmental DNA (eDNA) is a sensitive early detection system that may be useful in monitoring their spread. The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of eDNA technology in identifying infested water bodies, to determine if zebra mussel DNA is in the Adirondack water bodies not known to be infested, if the water chemistry of these water bodies is favorable for zebra mussel establishment, and if the eDNA technology is transferable to an institution like Paul Smith’s College. Eighteen lakes, all in New York State were sampled, fifteen of which are located in the Adirondack Park. DNA was extracted from water and plankton samples and species specific primers were used for PCR amplification to determine if zebra mussel DNA was present. Of seven samples taken from sites known to be infested, five of these tested positive for zebra mussel eDNA. Four lakes not known to be infested within the Park also tested positive for zebra mussel eDNA. Based on zebra mussel risk parameters (water chemistry) applied to 1,469 Adirondack water bodies, less than 3% are at risk of zebra mussel establishment. However it is possible that established populations could occur at microsites that may have locally high levels of calcium and higher pH.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Environmental Sciences, Environmental Studies, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2011
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Alexandria Bevilacqua, John Bishop, Charles Cain, Tyler Clark, Seth Crevison, Robert Culyer, Ryan Deibler, Brian DeMeo, Jonathan Eckert, Kirsten Goranowski, Joelle Guisti, Alan Jancef, Korinna Marino, Michelle Melagrano, KaitlynNedo, Joseph Nelson, Aaron Palmieri, Cole Reagan, John Scahill, JohnathanStrassheim, Scott Travis, Sarah Van Nostrand and Sarah Vella

Accommodation for the Deaf culture in hotels and recreational facilities

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 18:18
Abstract: Hotels and recreational facilities do not always have adequate accommodations, to help the Deaf culture communicate with the hearing world and take advantage of special services. Hotels and recreational facilities are improving their accommodation but more can be done to meet the needs for this demographic. This study will research what services are already available for the Deaf culture in hotels and recreational facilities. The outcome will determine what the Deaf culture prefers in accommodations, what hotels and recreation facilities offer, and new accommodations. This will help not only the Deaf culture, but everyone by breaking the language barrier between hearing and Deaf. The Deaf culture can benefit by utilizing new technology to have a more enjoyable experience at hotels and recreational facilities.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2011
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Virginia Schertel, Allison Moscato

Promoting Conservation of Biodiversity in the Adirondack Park Through Understanding and Engaging Stakeholders

Thu, 02/09/2012 - 11:31
Abstract: Anthropogenic disturbance of natural environments has led to the widespread loss of native biodiversity and degradation of ecosystems. It is increasingly recognized that addressing this “biodiversity crisis” entails understanding the societal drivers of unsustainable patterns of use. Conservation psychology is a new discipline that specifically focuses on understanding the linkages between human behavior and action and promoting a healthy and sustainable relationship between humans and nature. In this project, we employed principles of conservation psychology with the goal of improving the efficacy and efficiency of conservation of biodiversity in the Adirondack Park (AP). To meet this goal we employed three specific strategies. The first of these strategies was the use of surveys to assess the values, attitudes, and actions different stakeholders have in regards to conservation of biodiversity in the AP. These surveys were disseminated via both direct mailings and online, and included 30 questions. Our second strategy was to use discourse analysis to create a dictionary of terms and phrases employed in a positive, neutral, and negative light in regard to conservation of biodiversity. This entailed analysis of 30 emic accounts derived from opinion articles written by stakeholders in the AP, as well as analysis of a number of etic accounts drawn from online sources. Our third strategy was to use conservation psychology literature to assess ways in which the presentation of information and peer-dynamics influenced the responses of stakeholders towards conservation of biodiversity. Using the combination of these three strategies, we were able to provide a holistic understanding of how different stakeholders in the AP perceive and act towards biodiversity conservation; identify language that can be used to illicit a more positive response from these stakeholders; and identify specific tools based on principles of psychology that can encourage more active and effective engagement in conservation of biodiversity by different stakeholders. Our research findings will allow groups focusing on promoting conservation of biodiversity in the AP to be more effective and efficient in their work in the future.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2011
Authors: Christopher Critelli, John Ghanime, Derek Johnson, Samantha Lambert, Justin Luyk, Matthew Parker, Robert Vite, Heather Mason, Jesse Warner, Ethan Lennox, Sarah Robbiano, David Mathis, David A. Patrick