After logging in with the login link in the top right, click here to upload your Capstone

Capstone Projects

Creating a Reliable Surveying Network: Does Adding New Survey Control Points to Paul Smith’s College Campus Enhance its Current Network?

Tue, 12/05/2017 - 18:48
Abstract: The goal of the project was to improve the current geometry of the Paul Smith’s College surveying network. Four new survey control points were added to the current network allowing for new connectivity to old control points. Previously, there was a Westside network and an Eastside network that were not connected and by connecting these two networks, it has expanded the current network further into the campus. Two different methods were used to help identify the new network. A traditional survey method, a closed traverse, was used to connect the old control points to the new control points by utilizing a Nikon DTM-352 series total station. A X90 OPUS GPS unit was used to connect the new control points into a geodetic network. After the data was collected a least squares adjustment was done to the closed traverse to correct for error within the traverse. The GPS data was processed by Topcon Tools utilizing a Continuously Operating Reference System (CORS) to obtain a better level of accuracy for the network it produced. The two different techniques used produced different results in the overall survey networks and supplied different coordinates than what has been previously used by students at the college. These results gained from the project are not of a consistent level of precision and are not recommended for use without conducting more closed traverses to increase precision within the network.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy, Surveying Technology
Year: 2017
Authors: Frederick C. Petzoldt, Michael S. Thompson

The Application of Silvicultural Treatments to Establish and Maintain Early Successional Habitat in the Adirondack Forests of New York State

Sat, 04/29/2017 - 15:12
Abstract: Early successional habitat (ESH) in New York state can be described as young forests comprising trees, shrubs, grasses, and other herbaceous plants that form relatively open canopies with dense understories. ESH has decreased due to nearly ninety percent of the naturally occurring shrublands of North America having been destroyed. The destruction of this habitat is of top concern due to the threatened and endangered species whom rely on these sorts of habitats to thrive. Considering the future climate projections, population models, and theoretical species distribution, responsible stewardship is needed to manage in favor of ESH types. A meta-analysis of various journals and databases was performed to synthesize information into a general management plan for establishing ESH in the Adirondacks. Through combining methods and silvicultural management practices from past plans in the northeastern United States, as well as background knowledge of the area, this management plan has been tailored specifically for an Adirondack forest. These outlined silvicultural treatments may also be extended to a variety of other forest types in the eastern U.S.A. Re-establishing young forests throughout the region is the goal of this plan. In doing so, these practices will enhance the health, resiliency, and biodiversity of the Adirondack region, and New York State by creating critical ESH which the fauna and flora of this region depend upon.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Integrative Studies, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2017
Authors: Nicole Morin, Ryan Baker, Ora Bice

Wildfire Probability of Paul Smith’s College Lands

Tue, 12/05/2017 - 13:07
Abstract: For centuries, wildfires have been seen as devastating natural disasters burning homes, property and forests. For many years, man has tried to fight these fires to mitigate the damage that they do. In recent years, climate change has increased both the number of fires and the intensity at which they burn. We have developed a GIS model that incorporates factors such as slope, aspect, and land cover to determine what areas of Paul Smith’s College lands are prone to wildfires. Our goal was to find areas within the Paul Smiths College land that have a high probability for an intense wildland fire. We gathered our GIS data from online resources such as Cugir, NYS Clearing House and Earth Explorer. We then reclassified each of the data layers based on criteria determined from other scholarly papers to then use that criteria to develop our model. After running the model, we found twenty-two areas of interest also known as hot spots. We then proceeded to check five of the twenty-two hot spot areas to double-check that the characteristics that our model depicted were true hazardous areas.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2017
File Attachments: CapstonePaper.pdf
Authors: Michael Sweet , Joey Morris

Tiny houses for families

Tue, 05/02/2017 - 20:54
Abstract: Houses have changed in size and style over the centuries. We looked at tiny houses and research the economic and social benefits and issues with raising a family in a tiny house. We limited the family to four and made our house 800 square feet. We looked at case studies of families who are currently raising a family in a tiny home to find out what they say their problems may be. We found many unexpected benefits in our research. Many families believe that aside from the economic benefits, raising a family in a tiny home forces the family to be close and to communicate with each other. We interviewed a contractor, Harry Gordon, who gave us information in the building of sustainable housing. There was also a survey we conducted from the Paul Smith’s Community. The survey gave us data on the amount of people who were willing to raise a family in a tiny home. In our results, we found that for those willing to try to raise a family in a tiny house, it is very feasible.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy, Natural Resources Sustainability Studies
Year: 2017
Authors: Kimberly Yager, Sandra Esparza

Opportunities for Collaboration: A study of the participation in student activities and young alumni giving

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 20:23
Abstract: Student activity programs developed in collaboration of student affairs and alumni offices increase young alumni involvement. The successfulness of student activities in cultivating young alumni donors is unknown. The purpose of this study is to determine if the giving behaviors of young alumni can be enhanced by the participation in student activities. Current “involved” students will be queried through focus groups to gather insights as to their intentions of financial giving upon graduation. Recent graduates between the years 2007-2010 will be queried as to their giving behavior towards the college as well as activity engagement during their years at Paul Smith’s college and specifically what that engagement was. Colleges will better understand the benefits of implementing student activity programs.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2012
Authors: Christine Blakeslee

Creation of an Electronic Guide for Supplemental Instruction Leaders in Financial Accounting

Fri, 04/27/2012 - 11:07
Abstract: Created by University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC), supplemental instruction (SI) is an academic assistance program centered on peer-led sessions, used at centers of higher education world-wide, including Paul Smith’s College. In recent years, training for SI leaders at Paul Smith’s College has been put on hold while training of peer tutors, or those that work under SI leaders, is on-going. Although SI leaders get training during their tenure as peer tutors, further training is necessary to be an effective leader in a group setting. Investigating UMKC standards, Paul Smith’s students’ opinions, and current Paul Smith’s SI leaders’ opinions, it has been determined that more training for SI leaders at Paul Smith’s College should be offered. To facilitate additional training, a strategy is under consideration that is two-pronged: the use of Moodle (a copyright academic course management tool) and a guide for new SI leaders in the course of Financial Accounting (ACC 101). Together, this strategy will provide general knowledge about SI, techniques for a successful SI session, experiences from past SI leaders in course materials, and other insights that may be helpful to a new SI leader.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2012
Authors: Sara Glabien

The Waterhole's Upstairs Music Lounge Marketing Plan

Fri, 04/27/2012 - 11:31
Abstract: With any music venue attracting more customers through efficient ways of marketing is paramount. The Waterhole’s Upstairs Music Lounge located in Saranac Lake, New York, is the basis of this study to create a marketing plan for the establishment that will increase the volume of business. Information has been collected using surveys delivered to the local community. Further, interviews with The Waterhole’s staff members about the type of advertising they perceive reaches the market most effective were conducted. Using the information this research has developed ways The Waterhole can market itself more efficiently using print, radio, and social media advertising.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2012
Authors: Dustin S. Dwyer

Proposal for a Pet-Friendly Residence Hall

Fri, 04/27/2012 - 15:42
Abstract: A “pet friendly” college campus is one that allows students to house their pets with them; including in dorm rooms and other designated areas. This research is to investigate the appropriateness of having a pet-friendly campus at Paul Smith’s College. This investigation will show the psychological and physiological advantages of having pets as companions in a college setting, as well as determine if the current population (students, faculty and staff) is amenable to this model. The model for this project and a large portion of support herein was conducted by visiting the SUNY Canton campus and their pet-friendly residence hall. The data and observations were collected by interviewing the students who owned pets at the campus and gaining insight as to the emotional and physical support they felt the pets provided to them. Interviews were also conducted at the Office of Residence Life and the physical dorm itself was toured for this presentation. In conclusion, the proposal will show support for and suggest the renovation of a current dorm – likely Clinton or Lambert Hall – and the creation of a fenced in exercise area in which to maintain any foreseeable canine residents. This project will lay the ground work for making the Paul Smith’s College campus a more diverse and appealing environment for students and faculty alike.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2012
Authors: Ashley Keith

Small Restaurant Success in a Rural Community: The study of the gathering place phenomenon and its relation to success

Fri, 08/17/2012 - 07:48
Abstract: In small rural communities some restaurants are successful while others fail. It is unknown to what extent the gathering place phenomenon has an impact on restaurant success. The gathering place is nominally defined as a place where the community frequently goes to take it easy, communicate with friends, neighbors, and whoever else shows up. This qualitative study will explore how small restaurants operate in a given day. The researcher will play the role of a customer doing field research witnessing at the scene of the action if the restaurants fulfill the criteria of the 5 p’s of marketing. Price: What the buyers are willing to pay? Place: Where do the potential customers want to buy the product? Promotion: How will the customers know what one restaurant offers? Product: What features to include, and what to do without? People: How many customers are at the restaurant, and how many of them are a community member? The data will be analyzed if the gathering place effectively meets the 5 p criteria for success.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Template Capstone.docx
Authors: Marie Candee

A MULTI-SCALE EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF FOREST HARVESTING FOR WOODY BIOFUELS ON MAMMALIAN COMMUNITIES IN A NORTHERN HARDWOOD FOREST

Fri, 02/01/2013 - 16:19
Abstract: Forest harvesting and subsequent effects on forest structure have been shown to influence mammalian community assemblages and the abundance of individual species, however less attention has been paid to the implications of how harvested timber is used. This is particularly relevant in the Northern Forest, where a considerable portion of the forest harvesting is used to produce biofuels. Biofuels harvesting typically involves the process of whole-tree chipping which may lead to a dramatic reduction in the amount of woody material in the form of slash and coarse woody debris (CWD) left in harvested stands. The goal of our study was to assess the effects of biofuels harvesting on forest structure and subsequent effects on mammalian community structure and abundance. To address this goal, we focused on a ~35 Ha area of partially-harvested northern hardwood forest in the northern Adirondacks, New York. To sample mammals we used a combination of Sherman traps and track plates established at two scales across stands within this area. Our results showed that the response of small mammals to changes in forest structure is both species and scale specific. At the individual trap scale, CWD, slash, and understory cover were important drivers of the occurrence of individual species of small mammals. At the larger “grid” scale, small mammal relative abundance was driven by canopy cover and the density of woody stems. Our results indicate that the current harvesting practices used for biofuel production in the Adirondacks are unlikely to result in declines in abundance of common small mammal species. However, the retention of some slash post-harvest may be beneficial to some species, thus foresters may want to include slash retention when developing silvicultural prescriptions.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2012
Authors: Cody Laxton, Alisha Benack, Danielle Ball, Scott Collins, Sam Forlenza, Richard Franke, Stephanie Korzec, Alec Judge, Connor Langevin, Jonathan Vimislik, Elena Zito