After logging in with the login link in the top right, click here to upload your Capstone

Capstone Projects

White-tailed Deer Browse Preference: A Comparative Study of the Catskill and Adirondack Mountain Regions, New York State

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 14:23
Abstract: Abundant white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in New York State, United States, affect forest regeneration and stand composition through feeding (browse) pressure. White-tailed deer browse preference of six different hardwood tree species in two mountain ranges, the Catskill and Adirondack Mountains, within New York State were compared in order to determine the extent of browse selection by deer. There were no statistically different browse selection by white-tailed deer within the Catskills or Adirondack study area or between each study site. Visual analysis of the study areas after concluding the study revealed that red maple (Acer rubrum) was the preferred browse species at each study site.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Title, abstract, TOC , Report
Authors: John MacNaught, Blaine Kenyon, Mark Staats, Travis Boucher, Noah Finlayson-Gesten

"Adirondack Escapes" - Feasibility Study

Thu, 12/03/2015 - 15:55
Abstract: “Adirondack Escapes”, located on Osgood Pond in Brighton, NY, is a yurt-accommodation that offers an affordable rate and comfort. This accommodation will serve primarily as an overnight stay destination for those who like to visit the Adirondack Park. “Adirondack Escapes” would like to one day expand its guests, and potentially, house college students from the two college in the area.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2015
File Attachments: NEW CAPSTONE DEC 3.docx
Authors: Jordan Merry

Student Health Services: A Feasibility Study for Expansion

Thu, 12/03/2015 - 15:20
Abstract: The problem and solution that this study proposes involves Student Health Services. The problem SHS currently faces is that the wait time to see the nurse on campus varies in length and at times it can take longer than a half an hour for the student to be seen. After in depth analysis and discussions with the SHS Director and sole nurse, the solution proposed is to hire a second nurse.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2015
Authors: Abigail Bailey

Topaz Detailing

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 11:21
Abstract: Topaz Detailing plans to be the only mobile detailing presence in the northern Bergen County NJ area that people trust their cars with. Trust us how? Trust us in making their car look as good as or better than the day they drove it off the lot. The service that Topaz Detailing provides uses a very safe paint correction process that has been in used all over the world for many years. The process can be used to correct anything from holograms, swirl marks and shallow scratches in the clear coat of the car caused from daily driving and use of improper materials. Using this method by repeating certain key steps can remove up to 100% of the visible blemishes on the paint can be corrected while making the car look like new. The full paint correction process starts with a basic waterless wash with distilled water and lubricants to get rid of most of the contaminants. Second, the car will be clayed to remove the contaminants were not removed from the first step and that can’t be seen. Third, the car will be compounded with a dual action orbital polisher to remove most of the swirl marks and scratches, this step may be repeated as many times as necessary to achieve desired results. Fourth, the car will be polished with oils; this will give the car (especially darker ones) a high gloss as well as remove very minor swirl marks. Finally, the car will be given two thin protective coats of wax which helps improves appearance as well as act as a barrier that will protect the paint from the elements. This simple process is what automotive detailers around the world use. Short-term goals for Topaz Detailing would be to stay in business and expand our customer base so we can saturate the market in Northern Bergen County and surrounding towns. Long-term goals would be to expand the business and get a garage so detailing can be done in the winter months and on rainy days. Another automotive detailer will be hired to operate the van and still keep our business mobile. What makes Topaz Detailing special: as opposed to the competitors in the area, Topaz Detailing will be run out of a van. This gives the company a few specific advantages A) customers will find it more convenient that the detail shop comes to them B) they will not have to worry about getting the car they need to detail to the shop and find a ride back and C) customer will not have to waste any valuable time getting the car to a shop, we come to you!
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Topaz Detailing 2.docx
Authors: Karl Schubert

Tiny Houses: A Step Toward Conserving Natural Resources

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 13:45
Abstract: This project examines the potential to downsize America’s current living style in efforts to conserve natural resources and adapt to the changing world. The average home has increased to an excessive size over the years. As a result, abundant amounts of timber are desired, pollution is produced, and homeowners are buried in financial debt. A possible relief to these issues is the tiny home . Many tiny house advocates allegedly stated these structures require fewer materials to construct, lessening the need for natural resources. To confirm these ideas, a study was implemented through extensive research on small living, followed by a survey and the construction of a tiny house model. The results showed many American’s with large homes cannot justify the need for the excess space. Therefore, downsized to a tiny house may be a good choice for many citizens. These structures proved to require fewer materials at a more cost efficient price. So if the tiny house is both livable and affordable, what does this mean for the future of the tiny house?
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Capstone NRS 495
Authors: Tim Baker, Falon Neske

A More Sustainable Computer

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 09:36
Abstract: The idea of a more sustainable computer has been looked at before by Fitzpatrick et al (2009). The project relooks at the idea and expands on it, discussing the production of a sustainable computer by larger companies for everyday household use. By putting together a computer in a compact oak casing, with minimal wiring, plastic and metal use, the project shows how you can make a budget friendly sustainable computer. An important part about sustainability is reusability. The availability of part reuse and recycling is also looked into to be able to make the most out of what has to be used. The results show a way in which it is possible to make a budget friendly, design for environment (DFE) computer that could be sold for everyday household use.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: CAPSTONE.docx
Authors: William Ruger

Comparison of Industry Standard 5/16” Maple Sap Tubing Versus 3/16” Maple Sap Tubing Regarding Overall Yields for the 2014-2015 Maple Syrup Season at Paul Smiths College Visitor Interpretation Center, Paul Smiths, New York.

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 20:17
Abstract: Obtaining the highest yields during a growing season has long been the utmost interest by maple syrup producers across the northeast. Methods have been introduced such as different tubing sizes starting at 7/16” tubing to the industry standard 5/16” tubing, however recently the newest tubing on the market is 3/16” tubing. Theoretically the new 3/16” tubing would provide the highest overall yields in comparison to 5/16” tubing by increasing the amount of vacuum present under a natural gravity system. The study of examining the flow of maple sap between two tubing types consists of two sugar bushes located at the Paul Smiths College Visitor Interpretation Center in Paul Smiths, New York in the Adirondack Park. The two sugar bushes were constructed on similar landscapes providing the same of the following I.) Slope, II.) Size of trees, III.) Growing conditions, and IV.) Number of taps. Measurements of canopy cover and tree diameter were also compared to determine the overall health of both plots. The analysis showed that both canopy cover and tree diameter were less in 3/16” tubing however more sap still was produced in 3/16” tubing. The test compared 5/16” tubing versus 3/16” tubing in regards to overall seasonal yields. The overall seasonal yields for both 3/16” and 5/16” were measured in gallons from two separate locations. 3/16” tubing yielded more overall, ending with a total volume collected of 324.75 gallons of sap, while the standard 5/16” tubing yielded 296.5 gallons.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
Authors: Joshua Brewer

Changes in aquatic communities resulting from interactions between climate change and invasive aquatic plants in the Adirondacks.

Thu, 02/09/2012 - 11:26
Abstract: Global climate change can act synergistically with invasive species leading to shifts in ecosystem structure and function. We assessed how a rise in water temperature influenced the potential competitive advantage of an invasive aquatic plant, Eurasian watermilfoil, (Myriophyllum spicatum) over a co-occurring native species northern watermilfoil (M. sibiricum). We also examined the interrelationship between water temperature, watermilfoil, and the aquatic ecosystem including periphyton growth and zooplankton abundance. The study was conducted using replicated mesocosms (3785-liter), with water heaters used to provide a range of temperatures. We found that increasing water temperature promoted the likely competitive advantage of the invasive species, M. spicatum: Survival of M. sibiricum plants was lower than that of M. spicatum across all temperature treatments with a mean survival rate of 24% and 96% respectively. M. sibiricum also showed significantly slower rates of plant growth (mean growth of 3.3 cm compared to 7.6 cm for M. spicatum) and reduced vigor compared to M. spicatum, with an average of less than half the number of growing meristems. Zooplankton densities averaged over 20 times higher in mesocosms with M. sibiricum compared to those with the invasive M. spicatum. Periphyton biomass was best explained by water temperature with an increase in growth in warmer water. Our study confirms that in the face of global climate change, the invasive M. spicatum will continue to exert dominance over its native counterpart. Our results also provide compelling evidence that the combined effects of climate change and invasive aquatic plants can dramatically alter aquatic ecosystems.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2010
Authors: Nicholas Boudreau, Zachary Bozic, Geoffrey S. Carpenter, David M. Langdon, Spencer R. LeMay, Shaun M. Martin, Reid M. Mourse, Sarah L. Prince, Kelli M. Quinn, David A. Patrick