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Capstone Projects

The Rolling Pin

Mon, 05/11/2020 - 02:50
Abstract: For my capstone I created my business "The Rolling Pin". The Rolling Pin is a bakery solely focused on cannabis infused goods located in Denver, Colorado. The Rolling pin business plan includes everything from budgets, to employees, to menus. It is a grab and go establishment for anyone over the age of 21. Tourism in Colorado in recent years have seen major spikes, making this location perfect for a business of this type. I managed to learn much more about a lot of interesting aspects than I expected while researching for different parts of this project. I hope anyone who reads this capstone will find that same joy!
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
Authors: Amy Gonzalez

Baby Rach's Bakery

Sun, 05/10/2020 - 23:26
Abstract: For our capstone project, the assignment was to create a business plan and create our ideal bakery. Every little detail was to be planned out to create a successful business. We were to create a name, logo, and menu for our bakery. Baby Rach’s Bakery specializes in miniature treats, and catering for young children. I learned a lot about what it takes to run a business, and what it would cost for me to start my own bakery.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
Authors: Rachel Michaels

Cuyler Diner

Sun, 05/10/2020 - 22:33
Abstract: For capstone, I had taken an already existing business and made it my own. I had to research the current business plan of the diner and decide what direction I want to take the diner in, this meant I had to look at what is currently in the restaurant, the demographics, the atmosphere, and what expenses it would take to make the restaurant mine while still maintaining the current loyal customer base.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
Authors: Johnathan Wood

Rocky's Baking

Sun, 05/10/2020 - 17:23
Abstract: For our capstone we were to create a business and create a business plan for it. We also had to create three signature items for our business, mine was the Maple Bacon Bourbon Buns, Peanut Butter Whiskey Balls and Tiramisu Cupcakes. For my capstone I created a diner called Rocky's Diner and Bakery that is located in Lake George,NY and would be open year round. Due to this capstone I learned a lot about running a business and what it takes to get one started.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
Authors: Amber Rockwell

Alumni Campground Lean-to Design Analysis

Sat, 05/09/2020 - 11:32
Abstract: When thinking about the Adirondacks, lean-tos are among the first that come to mind. The Adirondack lean-to has, for most of the parks history, been a staple for back country shelters. The design of the lean-to is the most important part about them. Traditionally built with full round logs to have three walls and one open side with an overhang from the roof. Notches in the logs at each corner of the lean-to allow for the structure to be more ridged then if notches were not used. The goal behind this project is to look at the design of the Adirondack lean-to and see what about it could be simplified to make plans for an easier to build and construct lean-to.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Conservation and Management, Sustainable Communities & Working Landscapes
Year: 2020
Authors: Michael J Gaulin

Assessment of Barriers and Solutions to Obtaining Local Food on Paul Smith's College Campus

Mon, 05/11/2020 - 01:46
Abstract: Throughout the course of the last century, food systems have profoundly shifted from a primarily locally focused diet, to a virtually infinite global array of options. The many negative impacts of this momentous shift are now becoming more evident overtime. With light being recently shined upon these adverse effects, a substantial shift back to more local food options has begun. However, with all this newfound attention placed on localizing food systems, the meaning of local food has adapted an endless number of meanings. Paul Smith’s College agricultural instructor, Sara Dougherty echoed this feeling by saying, “‘Local food’ has been defined in a variety of ways, and we've seen this definition change and morph over time” (Dougherty). This evolving conversation around the benefits local food can have on communities has caused many entities to reassess their own food systems. More specifically, institutions of learning have increasingly rallied behind this movement. “Bringing healthy, locally produced food into institutions has been proposed as an effective strategy to address social, economic, and environmental issues” (“CAMPUS DINING”). Though the specifics of each sustainable food system are unique, they often share similar goals and values. Many of these values happen to also be innately engrained in the principles of which Paul Smith’s College was founded on.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Sustainable Communities & Working Landscapes
Year: 2020
File Attachments: Capstone Paper SUS 496.docx
Authors: Hannah Rion

Changes in aquatic communities resulting from interactions between climate change and invasive aquatic plants in the Adirondacks.

Thu, 02/09/2012 - 11:26
Abstract: Global climate change can act synergistically with invasive species leading to shifts in ecosystem structure and function. We assessed how a rise in water temperature influenced the potential competitive advantage of an invasive aquatic plant, Eurasian watermilfoil, (Myriophyllum spicatum) over a co-occurring native species northern watermilfoil (M. sibiricum). We also examined the interrelationship between water temperature, watermilfoil, and the aquatic ecosystem including periphyton growth and zooplankton abundance. The study was conducted using replicated mesocosms (3785-liter), with water heaters used to provide a range of temperatures. We found that increasing water temperature promoted the likely competitive advantage of the invasive species, M. spicatum: Survival of M. sibiricum plants was lower than that of M. spicatum across all temperature treatments with a mean survival rate of 24% and 96% respectively. M. sibiricum also showed significantly slower rates of plant growth (mean growth of 3.3 cm compared to 7.6 cm for M. spicatum) and reduced vigor compared to M. spicatum, with an average of less than half the number of growing meristems. Zooplankton densities averaged over 20 times higher in mesocosms with M. sibiricum compared to those with the invasive M. spicatum. Periphyton biomass was best explained by water temperature with an increase in growth in warmer water. Our study confirms that in the face of global climate change, the invasive M. spicatum will continue to exert dominance over its native counterpart. Our results also provide compelling evidence that the combined effects of climate change and invasive aquatic plants can dramatically alter aquatic ecosystems.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2010
Authors: Nicholas Boudreau, Zachary Bozic, Geoffrey S. Carpenter, David M. Langdon, Spencer R. LeMay, Shaun M. Martin, Reid M. Mourse, Sarah L. Prince, Kelli M. Quinn, David A. Patrick