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Capstone Projects

A Comparison of Winter Wildlife Use of Minimally, Moderately and Highly Impacted Shorelines on Lower St. Regis Lake and Black Pond in the Adirondack Park, NY

Wed, 05/09/2018 - 10:51
Abstract: Continued development and human interference with freshwater shorelines creates a degraded environment and can negatively affect native wildlife along impacted areas. Throughout the Adirondack Park, shorelines have experienced substantial degradation with the development of lakeside summer homes. There tends to be a strong preference for the aesthetics that lakes offer, as well as the numerous recreational opportunities they provide. The increased human use of shorelines and the development of anthropogenic structures has directly resulted in the degradation of shorelines in the Adirondack Park. Likewise, the Paul Smith’s College shoreline along Lower St. Regis Lake has been subjected to degradation throughout the history of the campus. This highly impacted site was selected, alongside minimally and moderately impacted sites in the surrounding areas as representatives for different impact levels. Shoreline degradation includes a decline in the health and presence of natural vegetation, creating a decrease in available food source for native wildlife. The removal of natural vegetation creates a decline in shoreline stability with the removal of root systems, allowing for greater amounts of erosion to occur. Additionally, degradation decreases available canopy cover and increases exposure of wildlife to predation. The objective of this study was to determine the difference in wildlife activity and diversity between three levels of shoreline impacts: minimal, moderate, and high. It was expected that the minimally and moderately impacted shoreline sites would show a greater diversity and abundance of wildlife than highly impacted shorelines. Trail camera data was analyzed at three sites for each treatment on Paul Smith’s College property, along both the Lower St. Regis Lake and Black Pond. Although we detected no significant differences in either activity or diversity across the treatments, there was higher relative activity and diversity in moderately impacted shorelines than minimally or highly impacted. However, wildlife species that are more rare and/or area-sensitive, such as the fisher (Martes pennanti) and American marten (Martes americana), were only detected in the minimally impacted shorelines of Black Pond. A restoration of the highly impacted shoreline to reflect minimally and non-impacted shorelines of the surrounding region would allow for opportunities to improve habitat for native wildlife species.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Ecological Restoration, Environmental Sciences
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Shoreline Restoration
Authors: Tessa White, Caroline Matuck, Kasey Lane, Rosemary Bloodnick, Kyle Pasanen, Annalee Kraai

Paul Smith’s College Shoreline Restoration Conservation Plan

Fri, 12/14/2018 - 12:24
Abstract: A restoration plan was created for the Lower St Regis Lake shoreline of Paul Smith's College. To date, about 140 students have participated by way of studies and course work in surveys and assessments, which clearly indicate a much reduced level of biological diversity, ecosystem function, and human uses compared to other sites. The plan is designed based upon field assessments and with the intentions of using the shoreline as an on-site case study of experiential education – a tradition of at the core of Paul Smith’s College. The aim of the restoration plan is to increase biodiversity, ecosystem function, aesthetics, educational studies, and shoreline use.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Ecological Restoration
Year: 2018
Authors: Hunter Gaudette
, Joseph Hollner
, Jonathan Meadows
, Ryan Morr
, Sara Savoia, Cassandra Schrader

Wetland X: Wetland Mitigation Plan Amendment

Mon, 12/03/2018 - 17:56
Abstract: Wetland X is a wetland that is located in Western New York and has been converted to agricultural land. The goal of this study was to create a restoration plan for Wetland X that meets Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) standards. The study took place during June 2018 with the final plan being completed in August of 2018 and the data analysis report being completed in the fall of 2018. The focus of the study was on the woody vegetation of the site to document the species present and the density of vegetation on the site. Vegetation was sampled on four plots located at different areas of the site to provide the best representation of the sites overall conditions. The areas were sampled using zigzag transects and grid transect patterns; with one area being sampled using the zigzag pattern, two using the grid pattern and one using both transect methods as a comparison of the two methods. Sampling of the site found that an amendment was needed for Wetland X to ensure that the landowner remained in compliance with the Food Security Act Standards. The restoration plan focuses on planting and management techniques for the site that will allow proper growth of desired vegetation species and the eradication of the invasive species. The created restoration plan amendment has been implemented and will be completed by June of 2019 with five years of monitoring following completion.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Ecological Restoration
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Pratt_Capstone_2018.docx
Authors: Thomas Pratt

Impacts of Maple Syrup Production Programming at the Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretive Center

Tue, 04/29/2014 - 12:37
Abstract: Education and interpretation provides strategies and techniques to successfully communicate natural resource and environmental concerns. This research addresses the effectiveness of a community education project at the Paul Smith’s College (PSC) Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) in the Adirondacks of New York State. Educational programs regarding maple syrup production were designed and evaluated to determine their impact on the local community. The objectives were to offer skills education, raise awareness on a local resource, foster a connection to the land, and offer involvement in the VIC’s community maple project. The goal of maple education at the VIC is to educate the community in an attempt to encourage the growth of an underutilized sustainable local resource that community members can become involved in without degradation of Adirondack forests. Determinations were made using a survey questionnaire provided before and after the programs were performed. Based on the data collected the determination made is that the majority of participants that attended ultimately were interested in becoming involved in maple sugaring using to VIC as a gateway for maple sugaring, primarily as a hobby and outdoor activity. This research has aided in the determination that effective programming at the VIC results in encouraging the community to be involved in maple syrup production. With this determination the VIC will continue to perform the designed educational programs as a service to the community.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Integrative Studies, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2014
Authors: Thomas Manitta

Risk on the Rocks: A study of risk as related to self efficacy in rock climbing

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 15:50
Abstract: Self efficacy is being confident in ones skills or ability to perform a task and may be directly linked to risk in relation to rock climbing. Risk is exposing oneself to danger that can cause you threat loss or harm. The purpose of this project is to see if there is a direct correlation between the risks that rock climbers take and their experience level. A goal sample of 100 rock climbers will partake in a survey asking questions that will help to estimate confidence, age, gender and risk taking behaviors in climbers. This study hopes to show that climbers are more willing to take risks when they are more confident in their experiences. The significance of this study will be useful to the climbing community as a whole because very little research has been conducted on this specific area of climbing.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Risk on the Rocks Capstone
Authors: Matthew Baer

An Investigation into the Pennsylvania Sunday Hunting Debate

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 14:17
Abstract: A current debate in Pennsylvania is taking place on the floor of the state congress and throughout small towns. Pennsylvania is one of eleven states that restrict Sunday hunting in some way. Recent bills have attempted to remove the blue law that currently restricts Sunday hunting in the state. Presently this attempt faces stiff opposition from famers, clergy, and other people who recreate outside. Most surprisingly though, is the large amount of varying opinion from hunters themselves on the Sunday hunting issue. This project will take an unbiased look into the Sunday hunting debate, and attempt to gain an understanding of why hunters have formed the opinions that they currently have. The project will then allow citizens of Pennsylvania to make a more informed decision on the issue of Sunday hunting.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2012
Authors: Robert J Edkin

Paul Smith's College Bouldering Guidebook

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 12:41
Abstract: The climbing community of Paul Smith’s College is rapidly expanding. Consequently, there are needs for an established set of climbing ethics (the informal guidelines that govern the development of new routes or climbing areas) and nearby places to practice climbing outdoors. To meet this need, a bouldering guidebook for the local area surrounding Paul Smith’s College that emphasizes ethical climbing practices will be produced. We will explore the woods that are within no more than a 10-minute drive from campus for glacial erratics that are suitable for bouldering. We will compile a set of at least 30 boulders that will be included in a guidebook and spend the spring, summer, and early fall of 2012 cleaning, developing, and documenting them. This guidebook will serve as a valuable resource for many future generations of climbers at Paul Smith’s College.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2012
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Dylan Shows, William Pregnall

A Paul Smith's College Student Recreational Needs Assessment, A Look Into the Recreation and Leisure Needs and Wants of the Students at Paul Smith's College

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 10:44
Abstract: Paul Smith’s College offers its students what seems like an endless amount of recreation and leisure opportunities. In the field of recreation, a needs assessment is the standard used to gauge the level at which the needs and wants of the users, in this case the students of Paul Smith’s College, are being met by the recreation and leisure programming and facilities available to them. An electronically distributed survey was emailed to all currently enrolled students asking them for their responses regarding the current and potential recreation and leisure opportunities available to them. The results were analyzed to concentrate the emerging themes. Suggestions were than produced that will help align available opportunities with the wants and needs of the students. Most of the suggestions deal with changes to programming, such as expanded offerings and extending the hours that programming such as the climbing wall and swimming pool are open. Yet, there were also recommendations made regarding the facilities, such as adding equipment to the climbing wall to enhance safety. The recommendations, which were directly arrived at using the student's responses, aim at bettering the available recreation and leisure opportunities. That in turn would better serve the students, while clarifying needs and wants to the staff associated with campus recreation at Paul Smith's College.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2012
Authors: Daniel Dwyer

Inclusive Recreation Programming: Pilot Programming at John Dillon Park

Tue, 12/04/2012 - 13:59
Abstract: This project developed pilot inclusive recreation programming for the users of John Dillon Park. From conducting a needs assessment of the park visitors we discovered what kinds of outdoor inclusive recreation visitors would most want to participate in. With this information, three programs were developed and implemented: Camp Cookery and Crafts, Neature Walk, and Halloween-To Fright Fest. Surveys of program participants were done before and after they participated in the programs in order to evaluate changes in well being indicators such as stress, anxiety, the sense of inclusion, and visit satisfaction. Results obtained were not reliable due to a low sample size but showed improvements in all areas. The scrap book pages and comments made by participants indicated that the programs were beneficial to them and should be continued in the future.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2012
Authors: Abigail Hughes, Sean Frantz