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Capstone Projects

A Taste of Tea

Thu, 11/30/2017 - 14:49
Abstract: Originating in Southeast China, tea is one of the most consumed beverages in the world, second only to water with coffee in third. Though tea has many names, they all come from the same plant, Camellia sinensis. There’s white, yellow, green, oolong, pu-erh, and black or red tea; each has its own variants and processing methods to distinguish them. Tea has spread throughout the world and each culture took these leaves and made it their own in different ways. The journey it has taken is an interesting one with a lot of controversy, conflict, and corruption once introduced to the British Empire.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts, Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2017
Authors: Darren Sheftic

Creating Universal Use for the Glenview Preserve

Fri, 12/15/2017 - 20:40
Abstract: The Adirondack Land Trust recently purchased 238 acres along Route 86 in Harrietstown. This tract of land is called the Glenview Preserve. The Adirondack Park Agency has already designated a scenic vista of Whiteface Mountain and the High Peaks. Along the back of the property is the Bloomingdale Bog, which is the third largest boreal peatland in New York. Vista like the Glenview Preserve, which doesn’t involve a climb and is also accessible to all. This poses the perfect opportunity to establish universal trails for all to enjoy. Conservation of land is made possible by connections that people make to the land. If there is no connection to nature, it could be destroyed without anyone speaking up. The location of this tract of land makes it ideal for accessible trail since there is no mountain to hike to get the view. Hiking is one of the oldest pastimes of the world. People can experience beauty every season of the year. It strengthens our bodies and minds at no cost. Hiking is a wonderful chance to feel the earth below your feet and get up close and personal with nature. Installing trails would not only open up recreational opportunities such as hiking, running, and bird watching, skiing and snowshoeing but also build community.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Sustainability Studies
Year: 2017
File Attachments: Capstone_Final.docx
Authors: Valerie Hoffman

Tiny houses for families

Tue, 05/02/2017 - 20:54
Abstract: Houses have changed in size and style over the centuries. We looked at tiny houses and research the economic and social benefits and issues with raising a family in a tiny house. We limited the family to four and made our house 800 square feet. We looked at case studies of families who are currently raising a family in a tiny home to find out what they say their problems may be. We found many unexpected benefits in our research. Many families believe that aside from the economic benefits, raising a family in a tiny home forces the family to be close and to communicate with each other. We interviewed a contractor, Harry Gordon, who gave us information in the building of sustainable housing. There was also a survey we conducted from the Paul Smith’s Community. The survey gave us data on the amount of people who were willing to raise a family in a tiny home. In our results, we found that for those willing to try to raise a family in a tiny house, it is very feasible.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy, Natural Resources Sustainability Studies
Year: 2017
Authors: Kimberly Yager, Sandra Esparza

My Awesome Capstone

Mon, 04/11/2016 - 15:19
Abstract: THIS IS MY CAPSTONE! PLEASE PRESERVE IT FOR POSTERITY.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Communication
Year: 2016
File Attachments: Press Capstone 2016.docx
Authors: Meggan Press

Where in the Unite States Can Dual-Flush Toilets Flush Out Savings?

Mon, 12/02/2013 - 13:06
Abstract: Potable water is becoming increasingly scarce in water poor regions of the United States. Reducing the volume of potable water consumed residentially and commercially is vital to ensure a stable water dependent future. Converting a traditional single-flush toilet into a dual-flush toilet is arguably the most effective means for reducing wastewater production in both residential and commercial settings. The objective of this study was to determine where within the United States dual-flush retrofits are cost effective. A cost-benefit analysis illustrating the price of the dual-flush retrofits & the monetary value of the water conserved post installation will be created using Paul Smith’s College campus of northern New York State as a testing site. The study will utilize a total of 145 toilets for both commercial and residential settings. Costs of the installation and purchasing of the product will be used to determine pay-back period and thus, the economic benefit of installing dual-flush toilets. Secondary data from previously completed dual-flush studies determined where within the 50 states dual-flush retrofits are cost effective. The resulting data illustrated relatively long payback periods for the greater United States with the most dramatic differences being seen in Hawaii and the least in Nebraska.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Sustainability
Year: 2013
File Attachments: FinalC.docx
Authors: Andrew Noviasky