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Capstone Projects

Student Health Services: A Feasibility Study for Expansion

Thu, 12/03/2015 - 15:20
Abstract: The problem and solution that this study proposes involves Student Health Services. The problem SHS currently faces is that the wait time to see the nurse on campus varies in length and at times it can take longer than a half an hour for the student to be seen. After in depth analysis and discussions with the SHS Director and sole nurse, the solution proposed is to hire a second nurse.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2015
Authors: Abigail Bailey

"Adirondack Escapes" - Feasibility Study

Thu, 12/03/2015 - 15:55
Abstract: “Adirondack Escapes”, located on Osgood Pond in Brighton, NY, is a yurt-accommodation that offers an affordable rate and comfort. This accommodation will serve primarily as an overnight stay destination for those who like to visit the Adirondack Park. “Adirondack Escapes” would like to one day expand its guests, and potentially, house college students from the two college in the area.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2015
File Attachments: NEW CAPSTONE DEC 3.docx
Authors: Jordan Merry

Topaz Detailing

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 11:21
Abstract: Topaz Detailing plans to be the only mobile detailing presence in the northern Bergen County NJ area that people trust their cars with. Trust us how? Trust us in making their car look as good as or better than the day they drove it off the lot. The service that Topaz Detailing provides uses a very safe paint correction process that has been in used all over the world for many years. The process can be used to correct anything from holograms, swirl marks and shallow scratches in the clear coat of the car caused from daily driving and use of improper materials. Using this method by repeating certain key steps can remove up to 100% of the visible blemishes on the paint can be corrected while making the car look like new. The full paint correction process starts with a basic waterless wash with distilled water and lubricants to get rid of most of the contaminants. Second, the car will be clayed to remove the contaminants were not removed from the first step and that can’t be seen. Third, the car will be compounded with a dual action orbital polisher to remove most of the swirl marks and scratches, this step may be repeated as many times as necessary to achieve desired results. Fourth, the car will be polished with oils; this will give the car (especially darker ones) a high gloss as well as remove very minor swirl marks. Finally, the car will be given two thin protective coats of wax which helps improves appearance as well as act as a barrier that will protect the paint from the elements. This simple process is what automotive detailers around the world use. Short-term goals for Topaz Detailing would be to stay in business and expand our customer base so we can saturate the market in Northern Bergen County and surrounding towns. Long-term goals would be to expand the business and get a garage so detailing can be done in the winter months and on rainy days. Another automotive detailer will be hired to operate the van and still keep our business mobile. What makes Topaz Detailing special: as opposed to the competitors in the area, Topaz Detailing will be run out of a van. This gives the company a few specific advantages A) customers will find it more convenient that the detail shop comes to them B) they will not have to worry about getting the car they need to detail to the shop and find a ride back and C) customer will not have to waste any valuable time getting the car to a shop, we come to you!
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Topaz Detailing 2.docx
Authors: Karl Schubert

A Global Recovery Plan for the Endangered Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus)

Tue, 04/28/2015 - 16:11
Abstract: Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) are the largest baleen whale species on the planet, and currently the biggest animal in existence. In the early 20th century, blue whales were nearly exterminated by whaling fleets until they received worldwide protection in 1967. Since then, the global populations of blue whales have had difficulty recovering due to their slow population growth rate and existing threats. Most of these populations are below 2,000 individuals with exception of a population off the coast of California, which has shown slight recovery in the past decade. The management of the blue whale depends on solutions that are addressed with long-term considerations, thus management will need to be continued for multiple decades in order to increase these global populations.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2015
Authors: Matthew Fuirst

American Lobster (Homarus americanus) Management in the inshore and offshore waters of Maine

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 14:39
Abstract: The goal of this management plan is to maintain a healthy and sustainable lobster population that can support the pressures of a profitable commercial fishery. The Maine lobster fishery is the second leading industry in Maine with recent annual profits of over 456 million dollars earned by less than the 6,000 commercial lobster fisherman within the state (DMR, 2015). The fishery has had record landings in the last decade and the fishery stock seems to be thriving. With the collapse of the Maine ground fish, shrimp, and scallop fishery many commercial fisherman have fallen back on one of the few fisheries that seems to have a promising future in the state. Some potential threats to the fishery are the increase number of fisherman in the offshore lobster fishery, the falling price per pound of lobster, and the growing risk of the spread of shell disease. To make drastic regulatory changes to the fishery at this time would be met with strong opposition by the stakeholders but increases in funding to expand on research and marketing initiatives to protect the future of the fishery has much more of a likelihood of being supported by the stakeholders of the Maine lobster fishery.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2015
Authors: Brandon Bezio

Introduction of Wood Bison (Bison bison athabascae) into Glacier National Park

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 16:00
Abstract: Wood bison populations have been reduced to only a few herds since the 1900s. These large grazers were once found throughout their range in Canada and Alaska and now there are isolated herds in Canada and only one herd in Alaska. The causes of population decline are over exploitation and habitat loss. Due to successful management practices the wood bison populations have been slowly recovering. The goals of this management plan are to introduce a wood bison herd into the Glacier National Park and to minimize the conflicts between humans and the bison. To achieve the goals of this management plan actions must be taken. The actions that will be used are to translocate individuals to the park, maintain the local ecosystem in the area of introduction, disease prevention, keeping the human and bison conflicts low, educate the local communities and stakeholders about bison, and to manage problem bison that leave the park. Introducing wood bison in Glacier national Park is beneficial because it will establish another wood bison meta-population and aid in the recovery of the wood bison in their native range. With this introduction, the hopes are to create a sustainable herd and to increase the wood bison population in their natural range.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2015
Authors: Dylan Hurst

Recovery Plan for the Reintroduction and Establishment of a Viable Wolverine (Gulo gulo) Population in Colorado

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 18:39
Abstract: After their near or complete elimination from the western United States in the early 1900’s, wolverine (Gulo gulo) began to recolonize small areas of their historic distribution in the northern portion of the Rocky Mountains during the latter part of the century. Though wolverine have not been recorded in the state since 1919 with the exception of a single dispersing male, Colorado still contains a large area of suitable wolverine habitat. Analysis of critical habitat characteristics revealed that Colorado’s wolverine habitat could support 21% of wolverine population capacity in the contiguous United States. This large area has the potential to serve as a core source population of wolverine to supplement periphery sink populations and provide population resiliency in the face of climate change or extreme mortality events. Despite the abundance of suitable habitat, the establishment of a viable wolverine population will require reintroduction, rather than relying upon extreme dispersal events of individuals from established populations. Keeping human-wolverine conflicts to a minimum, protecting potential denning sites from development, increasing and maintaining connectivity between wolverine habitats, and supplementing individuals from other populations to maintain genetic diversity within the relatively isolated habitat in Colorado will be critical for the persistence of this species. The utilization of this management plan can ensure that all ecological, socio-economic, and regulatory factors associated with wolverine reintroduction in Colorado can be effectively addressed to promote the success of wolverine recovery in the contiguous United States.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2015
Authors: Ashley Evans

Reintroduction of the Gray Wolf to Isle Royale National Park

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 18:52
Abstract: The gray wolf (Canis lupus) has a large historical range across the lower 48 states and has recently recolonized the Great Lakes Region in the 1970s due to migration. Wolves crossed an ice bridge to Isle Royale National Park in the 1940s and established a population. For over 50 years scientists have been studying this population, along with the resident moose population, to understand the ecology of a nearly unexploited ecosystem. The wolf population has been dropping in numbers over time, more severely in the last decade. The limited genetic diversity has been shown to lead to back deformities and a reluctance to breed amongst individuals. In May of 2014, the annual report stated only 9 wolves were left with only 2 females remaining. A meeting by the National Park Service concluded to only interfere if the chance of a breeding pair did not exist, in other words, the two females died. The most recent publication of the 2015 Annual Report stated only 3 individuals have been seen on the island. A management plan is critically needed to decide a course of action as to interfere or to let nature take its course. The purpose of this management plan is to propose a goal and set of objectives to achieve reintroduction of a wolf population after the extinction of the current poulation. To maintain a genetically viable population is to maintain sufficient gene flow with multiple breeding pairs within several packs. This can be achieved with a simulation of a “natural migration” by relocating individuals from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to Isle Royale. We can achieve the goal with sufficient funding, communication amongst partners, and current monitoring procedures.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2015
Authors: Kelsey Schumacher

Feral Pig Management for New York 2015-2025

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 20:40
Abstract: A population of feral pigs (Sus scrofa) has established a breeding population in New York State. These pigs have been escaping from hunting preserves throughout the state and have adapted to the habitat well. Feral pigs can cause a lot of property damage and also take out farmers’ fields by erosion or trampling the crops. There is a big problem with feral pigs in the southern United States and have grown in great numbers with great impact on the ecosystems. Feral pigs are an invasive species that have no population controlling predators and can reproduce rapidly. The pigs also compete with native species for food and habitat and can force native species to relocate to find more food. Pigs eat anything from bulbs and roots to eating rodents, frogs and deer. The pigs can also cause erosion of landscapes which can lead to nutrients washing away from the soil. Removal of feral pigs in the south has been ongoing for years without any success and their population is growing rapidly. Therefore, action must be taken now to stop the spread of feral pigs in New York before their population gets out of control. In order to reach this goal of complete eradication, different actions of removal need to be taken. Some of the actions that will be used to remove pigs will be trapping and setting out feeders with toxins in it designed for feral pigs. The other action that will be needed is creating regulations for hunting preserves that prevent pigs from escaping. If nothing is done now then the feral pig populations in New York will keep growing and lead to the same issues as southern states.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Management_Paper3.doc
Authors: Cody Fuller

Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) Management Plan for the Western United States

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 11:14
Abstract: Executive Summary Golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) can be found throughout the western United States in large meta-populations. Their population is currently stable but is being threatened by energy companies. The golden eagle population is currently growing about two percent a year. Within the past ten years, 70% of golden eagle deaths have been caused by human-related activities. Electrocution and interactions with wind turbines are the two primary causes of golden eagle deaths. Currently, there are not many actions being utilized to decrease the number of human-related deaths. Therefore, actions must be taken in order to reduce the number of human-related deaths in the western United States. The goal of this management plan is to maintain a self-sustaining golden eagle population. Actions such as decreasing the number of deaths by electrocution and wind turbines, and increasing the number of captive released subadults into the wild will help to decrease human-related deaths. Failure to act will likely result in the decline of golden eagles.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2015
Authors: Travis Stoll