After logging in with the login link in the top right, click here to upload your Capstone

Capstone Projects

Event Planning and What It Takes

Wed, 04/30/2014 - 21:03
Abstract: The focus of this capstone was event planning. What goes into planning an event? A professional planner needs to think about the goals, the needs of the customer, type of event, food and beverage, facilities and risk. To plan and execute an event, one must determine the type. For example, is it a corporate meeting or fundraising function? A budget is needed for each event to understand what is affordable and what can be done. What type of risk is involved? A good planner needs to plan for the “what ifs” of an event. Technology has changed the event industry. There once was a time when guests of an event would be asked to turn off their cell phones. Now everyone uses their phones at events. People can Tweet live and use social media to increase the experience of events. Planners can use social media to boost their marketing as well. Once a planner has experience in the industry they can apply to become a Certified Meeting Planner or a Certified Special Events Professional. This certification shows that the planner is an expert in their field. This capstone was planning a business plan workshop at Paul Smith’s College. This event was designed to give students a chance to develop a business plan. Potential transfer students were invited to take part in the event. During the event the students had to create a new product to market along with current senior business students who acted as their mentors. Together, they came up with a business plan and had to give an elevator speech on the product to everyone. The winning team was chosen based on the marketing, taste and idea of the product. The event was considered a success by the visitors and the college.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management, Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Stephanie Dalaba

Presence and Abundance of Microplastics within Flowing Waters of Private, Wilderness, and Other Forest Preserve Lands of the Northern Adirondack Park

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 16:26
Abstract: Microplastic sampling was conducted at thirteen locations throughout the water bodies of the Northern Adirondack Region. Plastics were found at all thirteen sites, which were categorized by the impact level of human development. Any particle less than 5mm can be defined as a microplastic particle. Microscopic plastics can be found in a variety of chemical cleaners, clothing fabrics, and concrete solutions. Storm water drainage systems and wastewater treatment plants are confirmed sources of microplastic pollution, which carry pollutants into our rivers, lakes, and streams. Ingestion of microplastic particles can lead to many distinctive threats, including biological and physical abnormalities, while possibly leading to bioaccumulation and biomagnification throughout the food web. Future practices for management and prevention of microplastic pollutants in the Adirondacks is critical for environmental protection, while also portraying a worldly view of an overlooked human induced issue.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2014
Authors: Patrick Colern, Sinjin Larson

Environmental Values Represented in Successful Green Building; LEED vs. Passive House

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 12:02
Abstract: In a society struggling to synchronize human development with environmental quality, the construction sector is often the target of sustainability initiatives. The purpose of this research is to investigate the environmental values and themes that influenced the design process of two successful green building projects. The two buildings at the focus of the study are new residential construction in the state of Maine; one with LEED Platinum certification and one with Passive House certification. Both buildings were found to exemplify themes of energy performance, practicality, and bioregionalism and included a collaborative design effort. A better understanding of these themes and values that guided these project teams to construct paradigm-shifting structures can help form a model for mainstream applications of a sustainable built environment.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Studies
Year: 2014
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Heather Coleates

Driftwood Suites and Conference Services

Mon, 05/05/2014 - 19:00
Abstract: These are the reports of the original business plan for Driftwood Suites and four year analyses of the Hospitality Business Simulation Course. Driftwood Suites and Conference Services is located on the beautiful shores of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. This property is located 30 minutes away from the nearest airport. Driftwood Suites and Conference Services is the perfect location for business travelers and leisure travelers. Driftwood Suites currently has 125 air-conditioned rooms, all with private bathrooms and is well equipped to accommodate business travelers which is the main demographic of the property. Surrounding the property is an enclosed garden and a 200 car parking lot adjacent to the hotel. The products and services at Driftwood Suites that are offered are a new conference center, business services, and quick check in and check out. This property has a data point for email and internet access, level three complimentary items, and level four in room entertainment. In addition to the existing services such as 24 hour front desk servicers, lobby lounge, a full service restaurant called the Shipwreck Restaurant with a total of 100 seats, and a Pub style bar called the Pearl Pub with snack services and an additional bar called the Sea Glass Bar.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Victoria Gonzalez

HOS 462 Hospitality Business Simulation Capstone

Mon, 05/05/2014 - 08:30
Abstract: This capstone was an simulation of the hotel business. The reports in this file are a business plan and analyses reports for the four years that we were asked to make operational decisions for. This class looks at everything involved with the operation of a hotel through the simulation of an fictional hotel that a group of students get to name and make all operating decisions for. Everything that has been learned through the time at Paul Smiths College is put to use when operating the hotel simulation.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2014
Authors: James Panza

Monitoring the Zebra Mussel Invasion Front: Use of New Technology

Thu, 02/09/2012 - 15:39
Abstract: Zebra mussels are invasive mollusks that are affecting the well-being of the water bodies in the United States. This study uses environmental DNA (eDNA) is a sensitive early detection system that may be useful in monitoring their spread. The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of eDNA technology in identifying infested water bodies, to determine if zebra mussel DNA is in the Adirondack water bodies not known to be infested, if the water chemistry of these water bodies is favorable for zebra mussel establishment, and if the eDNA technology is transferable to an institution like Paul Smith’s College. Eighteen lakes, all in New York State were sampled, fifteen of which are located in the Adirondack Park. DNA was extracted from water and plankton samples and species specific primers were used for PCR amplification to determine if zebra mussel DNA was present. Of seven samples taken from sites known to be infested, five of these tested positive for zebra mussel eDNA. Four lakes not known to be infested within the Park also tested positive for zebra mussel eDNA. Based on zebra mussel risk parameters (water chemistry) applied to 1,469 Adirondack water bodies, less than 3% are at risk of zebra mussel establishment. However it is possible that established populations could occur at microsites that may have locally high levels of calcium and higher pH.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Environmental Sciences, Environmental Studies, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2011
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Alexandria Bevilacqua, John Bishop, Charles Cain, Tyler Clark, Seth Crevison, Robert Culyer, Ryan Deibler, Brian DeMeo, Jonathan Eckert, Kirsten Goranowski, Joelle Guisti, Alan Jancef, Korinna Marino, Michelle Melagrano, KaitlynNedo, Joseph Nelson, Aaron Palmieri, Cole Reagan, John Scahill, JohnathanStrassheim, Scott Travis, Sarah Van Nostrand and Sarah Vella

A Healthier Lunch Line

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 19:57
Abstract: Unhealthy eating is an epidemic in America that is passing from generation to generation. It is becoming more crucial to find ways that can change eating habits at a young age due to the influx of marketing influences. This study will show whether educational marketing or aesthetic marketing is more effective on children’s food choices. The educational marketing will be implemented by interactive taste testing with the students, while the aesthetic marketing will be done by encouraging healthy eating with various wall illustrations and posters in the cafeteria. Both sets of data will be gathered before and after to be compared for effectiveness. Schools are currently struggling to find a way to encourage healthy eating with food that is appealing to a grade school student. If the presentation of food is part of a solution, then this study can help prove that simple changes to the cafeteria setting can reinforce children’s perception of health and help fight obesity and other health issues.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management, Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2011
Authors: Amiee Derzanovich, Morgan Horwatt

Promoting Conservation of Biodiversity in the Adirondack Park Through Understanding and Engaging Stakeholders

Thu, 02/09/2012 - 11:31
Abstract: Anthropogenic disturbance of natural environments has led to the widespread loss of native biodiversity and degradation of ecosystems. It is increasingly recognized that addressing this “biodiversity crisis” entails understanding the societal drivers of unsustainable patterns of use. Conservation psychology is a new discipline that specifically focuses on understanding the linkages between human behavior and action and promoting a healthy and sustainable relationship between humans and nature. In this project, we employed principles of conservation psychology with the goal of improving the efficacy and efficiency of conservation of biodiversity in the Adirondack Park (AP). To meet this goal we employed three specific strategies. The first of these strategies was the use of surveys to assess the values, attitudes, and actions different stakeholders have in regards to conservation of biodiversity in the AP. These surveys were disseminated via both direct mailings and online, and included 30 questions. Our second strategy was to use discourse analysis to create a dictionary of terms and phrases employed in a positive, neutral, and negative light in regard to conservation of biodiversity. This entailed analysis of 30 emic accounts derived from opinion articles written by stakeholders in the AP, as well as analysis of a number of etic accounts drawn from online sources. Our third strategy was to use conservation psychology literature to assess ways in which the presentation of information and peer-dynamics influenced the responses of stakeholders towards conservation of biodiversity. Using the combination of these three strategies, we were able to provide a holistic understanding of how different stakeholders in the AP perceive and act towards biodiversity conservation; identify language that can be used to illicit a more positive response from these stakeholders; and identify specific tools based on principles of psychology that can encourage more active and effective engagement in conservation of biodiversity by different stakeholders. Our research findings will allow groups focusing on promoting conservation of biodiversity in the AP to be more effective and efficient in their work in the future.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2011
Authors: Christopher Critelli, John Ghanime, Derek Johnson, Samantha Lambert, Justin Luyk, Matthew Parker, Robert Vite, Heather Mason, Jesse Warner, Ethan Lennox, Sarah Robbiano, David Mathis, David A. Patrick

Refining Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis) restoration efforts by comparing captive rearing and release methods used in the Albany Pine Bush

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 18:36
Abstract: With this research, the release efforts of the endangered Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis) of the Albany Pine Bush (APB) in New York State at two different stages of the butterfly’s life cycle were compared. Survival success rates were determined and environmental factors were measured to assess captive rearing methods and improve restoration efforts in the APB Preserve. Captive rearing efforts have been used in the past in this area, releasing Karner blue butterfly pupae into the wild; however, this year in 2011, pupae were allowed to eclose from their chrysalides in the lab and were released into the wild as adult butterflies. The analysis of the information gathered showed that the release of Karner blue butterflies in the adult stage offered a greater survival rate over release in the pupal stage. The average daily maximum temperatures increased each year during the summers of 2009-2011. Information from this research is important to help prevent the extirpation of this species from the Albany Pine Bush Recovery Unit and may be helpful to organizations such as the US Fish and Wildlife Services and the Nature Conservancy.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences
Year: 2011
File Attachments: CapstoneFINAL.doc
Authors: Chelsea Sendzik

Paul Smith's College Bed and Breakfast

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 21:25
Abstract: Paul Smith's College hosts numerous events, conferences, and open houses throughout the years that bring people to the area for an extended period of time. Currently, there is a house on campus with a fantastic lakeside view that is no longer being occupied. Bed and Breakfasts consist of several different departments: food and beverage, housekeeping, bookkeeping, management, tours, and various other occupations. Converting this house into a Bed and Breakfast would be an immense asset to the school. Opening this Bed and Breakfast would potentially be a benefit for Paul Smith's College, the students, and future guests. This study will determine if it is possible for Paul Smith's College to open and operate a Bed and Breakfast on campus, and if there will be enough of a guest interest for it to be successful. The opinions of potential guests will be measured by surveys and interviews, and will take a look at some competing properties and how they market to their customers. The consensus will be used to determine what Paul Smith's should do to market, advertise, and appeal to its clientele.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2011
File Attachments: Final Capstone.docx
Authors: Megan Frank