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Capstone Projects

Event Planning and What It Takes

Wed, 04/30/2014 - 21:03
Abstract: The focus of this capstone was event planning. What goes into planning an event? A professional planner needs to think about the goals, the needs of the customer, type of event, food and beverage, facilities and risk. To plan and execute an event, one must determine the type. For example, is it a corporate meeting or fundraising function? A budget is needed for each event to understand what is affordable and what can be done. What type of risk is involved? A good planner needs to plan for the “what ifs” of an event. Technology has changed the event industry. There once was a time when guests of an event would be asked to turn off their cell phones. Now everyone uses their phones at events. People can Tweet live and use social media to increase the experience of events. Planners can use social media to boost their marketing as well. Once a planner has experience in the industry they can apply to become a Certified Meeting Planner or a Certified Special Events Professional. This certification shows that the planner is an expert in their field. This capstone was planning a business plan workshop at Paul Smith’s College. This event was designed to give students a chance to develop a business plan. Potential transfer students were invited to take part in the event. During the event the students had to create a new product to market along with current senior business students who acted as their mentors. Together, they came up with a business plan and had to give an elevator speech on the product to everyone. The winning team was chosen based on the marketing, taste and idea of the product. The event was considered a success by the visitors and the college.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management, Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Stephanie Dalaba

Presence and Abundance of Microplastics within Flowing Waters of Private, Wilderness, and Other Forest Preserve Lands of the Northern Adirondack Park

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 16:26
Abstract: Microplastic sampling was conducted at thirteen locations throughout the water bodies of the Northern Adirondack Region. Plastics were found at all thirteen sites, which were categorized by the impact level of human development. Any particle less than 5mm can be defined as a microplastic particle. Microscopic plastics can be found in a variety of chemical cleaners, clothing fabrics, and concrete solutions. Storm water drainage systems and wastewater treatment plants are confirmed sources of microplastic pollution, which carry pollutants into our rivers, lakes, and streams. Ingestion of microplastic particles can lead to many distinctive threats, including biological and physical abnormalities, while possibly leading to bioaccumulation and biomagnification throughout the food web. Future practices for management and prevention of microplastic pollutants in the Adirondacks is critical for environmental protection, while also portraying a worldly view of an overlooked human induced issue.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2014
Authors: Patrick Colern, Sinjin Larson

Environmental Values Represented in Successful Green Building; LEED vs. Passive House

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 12:02
Abstract: In a society struggling to synchronize human development with environmental quality, the construction sector is often the target of sustainability initiatives. The purpose of this research is to investigate the environmental values and themes that influenced the design process of two successful green building projects. The two buildings at the focus of the study are new residential construction in the state of Maine; one with LEED Platinum certification and one with Passive House certification. Both buildings were found to exemplify themes of energy performance, practicality, and bioregionalism and included a collaborative design effort. A better understanding of these themes and values that guided these project teams to construct paradigm-shifting structures can help form a model for mainstream applications of a sustainable built environment.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Studies
Year: 2014
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Heather Coleates

Alpine Ecosystems on Ski Area Summits in the Northeast: A Best Management Practices Manual

Mon, 12/01/2014 - 15:19
Abstract: Over the past half a century, anthropogenic climate change has triggered temperatures in the northeastern United States to rise. This increase has led to decreased winter precipitation and a longer annual growing season. Species found in upland/montane habitats on the southern edge of their range limits are particularly threatened by these changes. Warmer temperatures have allowed larger woody plants to advance up mountain slopes, entering the habitat of these fragile species. In the next decade, we will witness a complete disappearance of alpine flora from several locations across the northeast including Whiteface in New York, Sugarloaf in Maine and Mount Mansfield in Vermont. Managers of ski resorts can therefore play an important role in promoting the continued persistence of high-altitude flora and fauna through carefully considered management decisions can also serve to promote the reputation of the ski industry as stewards of mountaintop ecosystems. Doing so will allow for continued study of the species that exist within these communities, the protection of biodiversity, and increased revenue for the resort itself through elevated public image and mountain-top tourism. To help begin these conservation efforts, we have created a best management practice (BMP) manual to guide ski area managers in making these developments. It includes techniques for sustainable slope, soil, vegetation and wildlife management, erosion control, artificial snow production, and ski slope construction and design. Also included are marketing techniques and an overview of the economic viability of the practices outlined in this manual.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2014
Authors: Pali Gelsomini, Dylan Randall

Driftwood Suites and Conference Services

Mon, 05/05/2014 - 19:00
Abstract: These are the reports of the original business plan for Driftwood Suites and four year analyses of the Hospitality Business Simulation Course. Driftwood Suites and Conference Services is located on the beautiful shores of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. This property is located 30 minutes away from the nearest airport. Driftwood Suites and Conference Services is the perfect location for business travelers and leisure travelers. Driftwood Suites currently has 125 air-conditioned rooms, all with private bathrooms and is well equipped to accommodate business travelers which is the main demographic of the property. Surrounding the property is an enclosed garden and a 200 car parking lot adjacent to the hotel. The products and services at Driftwood Suites that are offered are a new conference center, business services, and quick check in and check out. This property has a data point for email and internet access, level three complimentary items, and level four in room entertainment. In addition to the existing services such as 24 hour front desk servicers, lobby lounge, a full service restaurant called the Shipwreck Restaurant with a total of 100 seats, and a Pub style bar called the Pearl Pub with snack services and an additional bar called the Sea Glass Bar.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Victoria Gonzalez

HOS 462 Hospitality Business Simulation Capstone

Mon, 05/05/2014 - 08:30
Abstract: This capstone was an simulation of the hotel business. The reports in this file are a business plan and analyses reports for the four years that we were asked to make operational decisions for. This class looks at everything involved with the operation of a hotel through the simulation of an fictional hotel that a group of students get to name and make all operating decisions for. Everything that has been learned through the time at Paul Smiths College is put to use when operating the hotel simulation.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2014
Authors: James Panza

Maintaining the Population of Thornicroft Giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis thornicroftt)

Sun, 05/04/2014 - 13:12
Abstract: There is a lack of information on the Thornicroft giraffe’s population size and of the amount of poaching taking place on the giraffes with in the Southern Luangwa Valley National Park. As of right now the giraffes population appears to be stable but there are a lot of factor unknown pertaining to the threats to the population and to their habitat. The goal of this management plan is to maintain the Thornicroft Giraffes population which is exclusively found in Luangwa Valley in Zambia Africa, the management plan is focused on the Southern Luangwa Valley National Park. With this management plan the objectives is to establish the population size within the park, maintain the preferred habitat of the giraffes, determine if poaching is taking place within the park and the potential effects poaching could have on the population. Once the population is known and stable then a harvest management strategy will be implemented for the locals. There will be pamphlets handed out in villages in the area; along with a survey used to access on poaching and the importance that giraffe based products have on their culture.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2014
File Attachments: Managment rough draft.docx
Authors: Emily Williams

Impacts of Maple Syrup Production Programming at the Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretive Center

Tue, 04/29/2014 - 12:37
Abstract: Education and interpretation provides strategies and techniques to successfully communicate natural resource and environmental concerns. This research addresses the effectiveness of a community education project at the Paul Smith’s College (PSC) Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) in the Adirondacks of New York State. Educational programs regarding maple syrup production were designed and evaluated to determine their impact on the local community. The objectives were to offer skills education, raise awareness on a local resource, foster a connection to the land, and offer involvement in the VIC’s community maple project. The goal of maple education at the VIC is to educate the community in an attempt to encourage the growth of an underutilized sustainable local resource that community members can become involved in without degradation of Adirondack forests. Determinations were made using a survey questionnaire provided before and after the programs were performed. Based on the data collected the determination made is that the majority of participants that attended ultimately were interested in becoming involved in maple sugaring using to VIC as a gateway for maple sugaring, primarily as a hobby and outdoor activity. This research has aided in the determination that effective programming at the VIC results in encouraging the community to be involved in maple syrup production. With this determination the VIC will continue to perform the designed educational programs as a service to the community.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Integrative Studies, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2014
Authors: Thomas Manitta

Is Green Construction Economically Feasible

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 14:12
Abstract: Green construction is a valuable part of our developing world. Building green will help reduce the negative effects of pollution in our atmosphere. It will also help reduce electrical uses throughout the household and allow you to have a reduction in costs to paying electrical bills. Too many, this process is considered to be expensive to build this way. Products that green homes are made of are considered to be expensive. The materials for energy production are also considered expensive. Too address this, a survey was conducted to see the views of individuals and what they believe it costs to have a green home. The survey also asked if people would consider having a green home if they had the option. It is proven having a green home will reduce the costs of a home eventually leading to paying nothing for maintaining a house called a payback period. To build green will mean to pay less over time and maybe eventually lead to getting paid. There are also many government incentives for building green. The government can invest in this building so you may afford a green building. It is well advised to be educated in all aspects of building green such as the tax incentives, payback periods, environmental effects, and how to approach this.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2014
File Attachments: final Capstone Draft.docx
Authors: Daniel Hourihan, Zachary Mein

Python Scripting an ArcGIS Add-in for Wildlife Telemetry Data Processing

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 15:46
Abstract: There are currently no modern open source alternatives to commercial radio telemetry processing software. I developed a python add-in for ArcGIS which allows for interactive editing of telemetry data. The add-in was tested for functionality, accuracy and usability. Functionality was tested according to how closely it adhered to the original software requirements specification. Accuracy was tested by generating telemetry data from known animal locations and comparing the estimated locations to the actual locations. Usability was tested through speak aloud user tests. User data was collected on completion status, time of completion, and number usability issues found. The intended functionality goals were met and exceeded. Accuracy was less than expected with an average inaccuracy distance of 202 meters and approximately 10% of the bearing groups were unable to generate a centroid. During user testing, a total of 33 usability issues were discovered that hindered use of the software and on average it took a student 18 minutes to process one data set without prior exposure to the add-in. Qualitative observations from the user tests could be a launching point for GIS usability studies. In addition, the core modules could be modified and expanded into a separate application with dependency on Quantum-GIS or Geographic Analysis Support System (GRASS).
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2014
File Attachments: Kacir_2014.docx
Authors: Robert Kacir