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Capstone Projects

Optimal Clutch Size of American Kestrels (Falco sparverius) in Northern New York

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 12:08
Abstract: American kestrels readily use nest boxes, which makes them perfect candidates for studies on nesting activity and success. Nesting success is important to understand so that managers can effectively assess the productivity of a breeding population of kestrels. The goal of this study was to determine optimum clutch size for American Kestrels in Northern New York. The hypothesis was that optimum clutch size consisted of four eggs per clutch. The objective was to determine what clutch size is most effective at hatching young. The study was conducted during the months of June 2013 through August 2013 on 150 nest boxes that were established in 2002. The contents of each elevated nest box were observed using a video baby monitor attached to an extendible pole to minimize disturbance. Clutch size data and number of chicks hatched was compiled and analyzed using a Kruskal-Wallis test. This test was used because it allowed data to be separated into different clutch sizes, and determined the significance between the number of eggs in each clutch and the number of chicks hatched. Clutch sizes varied from 1-5 eggs, with occurrences of one and four eggs being most common. The majority of nesting attempts with one egg failed, resulting in a low probability of chicks hatching from one egg clutches. A clutch size of four eggs has the highest probability of successfully hatching chicks and the highest mean number of chicks hatched compared to the other clutch sizes.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2014
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Jennifer Miller

Managing Raccoon (Procyon lotor) Populations in Urban Environments of New York State

Mon, 05/06/2013 - 17:29
Abstract: With the human population growing over time, so has the amount of urban and suburban populations. Urban areas have fragmented the landscape that can attract wild populations into the urban areas. One of these species that has been attracted includes the raccoon (Procyon lotor). In urban areas where resources are abundant, raccoon densities can become very high and they can become very destructive to homes. They are destructive to homes because of their generalist foraging habits and creation of den sites in human’s homes. Raccoons can be particularly dangerous in the spread of epizootics such as rabies, canine distemper, and roundworm. With raccoons in high densities the spread of the epizootics becomes very easy between raccoons which can cause a higher transmission rate to domestic animals or humans. Since population reduction methods have proven to be ineffective in reducing raccoon populations, education to the public to reduce the densities of raccoons may be the most effective. Proper management in maintaining public facilities, feeding wild and domestic animals outdoors, along with precautionary measures to take with your home can help in reducing the amount of negative interactions with raccoons. Also using current or past DEC or animal control data can help determine areas of highest negative interactions with the public to prevent future incidences in occurring.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2013
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Scott M. Collins

Multigenerational Vacations and Family Resorts

Wed, 12/04/2013 - 19:23
Abstract: Currently there is a large number of Baby Boomers that are taking their children and grandchildren on vacations and they are the ones paying for it all. What is not known is how and to what extent this new type of travel will impact family resorts. The purpose of this study is to identify the impact of Baby Boomers taking more multigenerational vacations on family resorts. This is a descriptive, exploratory research method. The central question is how this new type of travel will impact family resorts. A survey will be used to collect information from different family resorts. The family resorts will be located all over the country. The information gathered from this survey will be compiled based on what this segment of travel wants and requires. This study will help family resorts plan for the future to ensure that this new segment of travel is happy and continues to stay there.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Rielly Kavanaugh

Preservation & Expeirece

Fri, 12/06/2013 - 19:04
Abstract: This quantitative study is designed to determine how and to what extent cultural heritage travelers who have journey to the Mexico's Ancient Ruins experienced limitations set as a result of needed preservation to prevent future deterioration caused by natural and anthropocentric factors. Preservation methods set and monitored by the National Institute of Anthropology & History (INAH), the National Commission for Protected Natural Areas (CONANP), however do they take from the experience? The ruins chosen for this study are the Pre-Hispanic City of El Tajin, the Pre-Hispanic City & National Park of Palenque, and the Pre-Hispanic City of Chichen Itza .The methodology that will be used in this study is data collection and analysis. Data from research will be collected to gain a numeral estimate of tourist who experienced limitations as a result of prevention methods used to preserve the Ruins of Mexico. The ultimate significance of this study is to provide awareness of the possible limitations preservation methods can have on the tourist’s experience, this information is not provided in studies.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Voniesha Brown

Destination Attachment: Connecting and Learning in New Orleans

Mon, 04/22/2013 - 11:47
Abstract: Educational experiences have the potential to connect the participant to a destination and its people. Food plays a large part in perception of the destination. Learning about food and actively engaging in its creation can be a unique experience. Destination attachment leads to loyalty and repeat visits. The purpose of this study was to investigate how and to what extent the leisure traveler can develop destination attachment in result of participating in educational cooking experiences at a specific destination. This qualitative, inductive relationship study explored how and to what extent offering cultural cooking classes to the leisure traveler at a destination relates to destination attachment. Data was collected through an online survey distributed to class participants. Opinions about the educational cooking experience were collected and analyzed to gauge if the cooking experience had any effect on destination attachment. Destination institutions will be interested in this data if they are looking into offering cultural educational cooking experiences.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Elise Wallner