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Capstone Projects

A Taste of Duck

Mon, 05/07/2018 - 09:17
Abstract: A four course meal based around duck.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Taylor Engel

Mycophagy of the Adirondacks

Sat, 12/08/2018 - 11:26
Abstract: Throughout the course of mushroom history, they have gained multiple reputations, being known as a food source or a deadly fungus. According to Tori Avey, she believes that “Over the years reckless mushroom hunters have thrown caution to the wind with fatal results, giving food safe mushrooms a bad reputation. Which resulted in two very different categories of people mycophiles, those who love mushrooms and mycophobes those who fear mushrooms.” (Avey,T) Mycophagy is the practice of consuming fungus collected in the wild, also known as eating foraged mushrooms. Mushrooms are grouped into the vegetable category within the local grocery stores, but they are not a vegetable mushrooms are a type of edible, poisonous, psychedelic, and medicinal fungus with over 400 different species. Many Mycophiles believe we are currently, in the beginning of a myco-revolution many people are now interested in the wide range of gourmet wild mushrooms “The name “mushroom” has been given to over 38,000 varieties of fungus that possess the same threadlike roots and cap.” (Avey,T)
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Selena C. Hay

Root Vegetables of the Adirondacks

Sat, 12/09/2017 - 14:52
Abstract: Learn about the nutrient packed superfoods that grow right here!
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Portfolio , Poster
Authors: Stephen DeSimone

A Community In a Meal

Fri, 05/04/2018 - 20:43
Abstract: Capstone focusing on the impact of sit-down meals. How the culture of sharing meals and making meals at home are changing.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Rae Bednar

A Taste of Beer

Mon, 05/07/2018 - 09:17
Abstract: This capstone showcases four different brews in each course
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Brenna Zesky

A taste of Maple syrup

Mon, 05/07/2018 - 13:28
Abstract: A four course meal based around maple syrup
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Alexis Best

Mozzarella

Tue, 05/08/2018 - 21:22
Abstract: Fresh Mozzarella- Dinner in Italy
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Paper , Costing Sheets.xlsx
Authors: Tara Stiller

Assessing the Use of Backpack Electrofishing to Index Age-0 Fish Abundance in Woody Structure Adjacent to the Lakeshore

Fri, 12/14/2018 - 10:50
Abstract: The preservation and monitoring of age-0 fishes and their habitat is imperative to the overall health of a lake and its fishery. The effectiveness of backpack electrofishing at capturing age-0 fishes along shorelines with coarse woody structure was assessed by attempting to correlate electrofishing catch rates with known population sizes. A 60x2m controlled study area along the shoreline of Lower St. Regis lake was selected and blocked off through use of a net encompassing the perimeter. Known population sizes were stocked into the net and a three-pass electrofishing depletion was conducted within the study area. Results indicated that there was no significant correlation between the known population size and the population estimate generated through electrofishing (p = 0.172). The lack of correlation may have been due to failure of the block net encompassing the study area.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Full Report
Authors: Justin Rozema

Management plan for wild ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) populations in Wyoming County, New York

Wed, 05/02/2018 - 18:51
Abstract: Ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) are an upland game species found throughout much of the United States, including western New York. Pheasant population numbers throughout the state have decreased since their peak in the 1960s and 1970s, and continue to decline. Their diet is focused on small invertebrates as well as seeds, grains, roots, and berries. Their habitat consists primarily of small overgrown farm fields with abundant edge habitat and hedgerows for escape, thermal, and nesting cover. Much is known about the biology of this species but population numbers continue to decrease throughout New York despite current management actions. The decline of this species has been due to the loss of cover from monocultures and increased predation by red fox (Vulpes vulpes), coyote (Canis latrans), skunk (Mephitidae), raccoon (Procyon lotor), and avian predators such as the red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis). Ring-necked pheasants are a primary game species in areas of New York that help contribute monetary funds to assist with the states conservation needs. Currently, the majority of hunters in the state rely on the introduction of pen-raised pheasants for a successful hunt. The goal of this management plan is to maintain a self-sustained wild ring-necked pheasant population for sporting, aesthetic, biologic, and scientific value in the town of Middlebury, Wyoming County, NY. This goal requires multiple objectives and actions to ensure success of the species in the Middlebury study area. Management plan objectives include: 1) increase available pheasant habitat on private lands by 10% in ten years, 2) increase the wild pheasant populations in the town of Middlebury by 15% in 10 years (2018-2028), and 3) control pheasant predator populations (coyote, red fox, red-tailed hawks, raccoons and skunks) in the town of Middlebury by decreasing them by 15% in the next ten years (2018-2028). Pheasant populations are important to ecosystem health by providing seed dispersal for many plant species as well as being an important prey species. Being that pheasants are a game species, they provide a source of monetary value to conservation funds that can be used for the conservation of other species. More habitat and predation studies need to be conducted in the town of Middlebury as well as the rest of the county to better inform managers on the needs of the species. If the conservation needs of the ring-necked pheasant are addressed correctly, a self-sustained wild population will be possible.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2018
Authors: Dakotta Loft

Population Management for Invasive Cane Toads (Rhinella marina) in Florida

Wed, 05/02/2018 - 20:59
Abstract: Cane toads (Rhinella marina) are a relatively large species of anuran that are historically native to South America through Central America and as far north as extreme Southwestern Texas. This range has been artificially expanded by humans to numerous areas of the globe, usually as a form of biological pest control, the most infamous of which is the release of a population of cane toads in Australia in the 1930’s that failed and has wreaked havoc on the native ecosystems and residents of the country ever since with no evidence of stopping. Cane toads were also inadvertently released into Florida in the 1950’s when a population escaped from the Miami airport, and was supplemented by subsequent releases from pet owners. The main concern with cane toads is their particularly potent toxin that they release when threatened which has led to many cases of pet death and emergency vet visits for curious dogs in Florida and the decline of some entire species of predator in Australia. However the detrimental effects can also come in other forms as cane toads can be hosts for “the parasite spill back” phenomenon, in which an invading species such as cane toads can be the perfect breeding ground for a parasite and then through expanding range and increasing population numbers disseminate it to other related species. As of now cane toads are mostly a problem for pet owners in Florida and do not seem to be much threat to the natural ecosystems as they are limited in movement by Florida’s tall grass ecosystems. This threat should not be ignored however, as cane toads are highly adaptable and in Australia the invading population has adapted to habitats in which they are not usually encountered. The goal of this management plan is to use the lessons of Australia and what little research has been done in the United States to reduce the population of, and prevent or limit the spread of cane toads further into urban areas and prevent potential degradation of natural habitat by 2028. This includes the education and training of the public to help get the highest numbers of individuals captured, along with education for pet owners on what to do should your pet become poisoned and the best ways to prevent this. Should this plan be successful it will help to prevent a potentially disastrous situation resembling the one that has occurred in Australia while the cane toad is still very limited in its movements and vulnerable to large scale elimination efforts.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2018
Authors: Christopher Rappleyea