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Capstone Projects

Lower St. Regis Lake Survey: A Comparative Study of Fish Population Structure and Function over Time

Thu, 12/13/2018 - 14:24
Abstract: Lake surveys are performed on bodies of water to provide a health analysis of fish populations over time. Lake surveys can be conducted in a variety of ways to attain specific data. Lower St. Regis Lake was surveyed to determine the fish community composition and to understand fish population traits. Using fyke nets placed at six predetermined locations for 24 hours, as well as fishing, we collected data for age, length (mm), weight (g), and parasites present. Data was analyzed in the lab using Excel to form graphs and tables to demonstrate our findings. Catch rates were lower compared to years before and comparing our data to New York State Department of Conservation data found that our length-at-age data was lower for the six-species sampled. Pumpkinseed and yellow perch were the only two species to have over twenty fish sampled. Decreased air temperatures brought in by a cold front during the week of our sampling may have been a reason for our lower number of fish caught. Mesh size is also a bias while using these nets as smaller fish can escape, and predatory fish can prey on smaller fish while in the net. Some species of fish such as black crappie may be more susceptible to capture due to its habit of associating with structure.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Environmental Sciences, Environmental Studies, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Capstone_Final.docx
Authors: Deacon Chapin, Jared Chlus, Louis Daversa, Jon Herrman, Robert Visicaro

A Comparison of Winter Wildlife Use of Minimally, Moderately and Highly Impacted Shorelines on Lower St. Regis Lake and Black Pond in the Adirondack Park, NY

Wed, 05/09/2018 - 10:51
Abstract: Continued development and human interference with freshwater shorelines creates a degraded environment and can negatively affect native wildlife along impacted areas. Throughout the Adirondack Park, shorelines have experienced substantial degradation with the development of lakeside summer homes. There tends to be a strong preference for the aesthetics that lakes offer, as well as the numerous recreational opportunities they provide. The increased human use of shorelines and the development of anthropogenic structures has directly resulted in the degradation of shorelines in the Adirondack Park. Likewise, the Paul Smith’s College shoreline along Lower St. Regis Lake has been subjected to degradation throughout the history of the campus. This highly impacted site was selected, alongside minimally and moderately impacted sites in the surrounding areas as representatives for different impact levels. Shoreline degradation includes a decline in the health and presence of natural vegetation, creating a decrease in available food source for native wildlife. The removal of natural vegetation creates a decline in shoreline stability with the removal of root systems, allowing for greater amounts of erosion to occur. Additionally, degradation decreases available canopy cover and increases exposure of wildlife to predation. The objective of this study was to determine the difference in wildlife activity and diversity between three levels of shoreline impacts: minimal, moderate, and high. It was expected that the minimally and moderately impacted shoreline sites would show a greater diversity and abundance of wildlife than highly impacted shorelines. Trail camera data was analyzed at three sites for each treatment on Paul Smith’s College property, along both the Lower St. Regis Lake and Black Pond. Although we detected no significant differences in either activity or diversity across the treatments, there was higher relative activity and diversity in moderately impacted shorelines than minimally or highly impacted. However, wildlife species that are more rare and/or area-sensitive, such as the fisher (Martes pennanti) and American marten (Martes americana), were only detected in the minimally impacted shorelines of Black Pond. A restoration of the highly impacted shoreline to reflect minimally and non-impacted shorelines of the surrounding region would allow for opportunities to improve habitat for native wildlife species.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Ecological Restoration, Environmental Sciences
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Shoreline Restoration
Authors: Tessa White, Caroline Matuck, Kasey Lane, Rosemary Bloodnick, Kyle Pasanen, Annalee Kraai

A Taste of Local Goat Cheese

Sat, 12/08/2018 - 11:22
Abstract: This capstone features the variety of goat cheeses in each of the courses!
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Julia Ho(:

A Taste of Paul Smith's & The Adirondacks

Sun, 12/09/2018 - 15:50
Abstract: Using what we have learned over the last four years our task was to put on a themed Capstone Dinner. This dinner was experiential and progressive, guests were transported to different parts of the Paul Smiths College campus for each course of the dinner. The focus of this Capstone was to capture the essence of the Adirondacks to portray it through a five course meal. I first looked to the woods for help building inspiration for each dish. Along with the dinner, comes many other tasks from ordering to costing.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Sean Conroy

Modern Cooking Techniques

Tue, 05/08/2018 - 12:13
Abstract: The history of molecular gastronomy and the methods.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Averie Riel

Soy

Tue, 12/09/2014 - 16:08
Abstract: Soybeans have a long history rooted in China, where it was a staple crop and main part of the diet. Over the years it has found its way into many different countries where it had many different influences. Additionally soybeans are extremely versatile and can be found in many different forms including tofu, oil, meat and cheese substitutes, miso and tempeh. However half of the world thinks soy is strange, exotic and only suitable as cattle feed.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Sarah Rogers

Capstone

Wed, 12/10/2014 - 12:46
Abstract: Morgan Cuozzo
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Morgan Cuozzo

Potato

Wed, 12/10/2014 - 14:06
Abstract: **Summary of Portfolio** When we picked our topics out of the hat, with my result being Potato, I took a very literal approach. Potato was the star in all 3 dishes, with help from other flavors, the potato was allowed to shine. I chose the Papas Rellenas dish because it was right up my alley as a chef, something stuffed and deep fried, but also spoke to the heritage of the potato. Potato originated in Peru and this was a Peruvian Papas Rellenas. The Gnocchi was an easy choice because it was a dish I really enjoyed making and eating in Italy, when I studied Abroad. The first time I had the sage and butter sauce with sautéed Gnocchi, I knew it was my favorite. Not only because of the simplicity of the Sauce, but how clearly you tasted POTATO when you ate the dish. It was difficult to find a potato dish that also had a recipe that was acknowledged to produce decent product. I was staying away from sweet potato because it is not technically a potato. I read a lot of recipe reviews, things like potato tortes and truffles but with mixed opinions on how the outcome was taste / consistency etc. When I found the Super Spud Brownie, most reviews said it was moist and delicious and a solid recipe so I figured it would be a good desert.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Wills Ohrnberger

Corn and culture

Thu, 12/11/2014 - 10:47
Abstract: no abstract
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Christopher Griffin

Afternoon Tea

Wed, 12/17/2014 - 17:26
Abstract: After air and water, tea is the most commonly consumed substance on earth. This steeped plant matter has affected every facet of the world, from the Buddhist Moncks of China to the royal courts of Britain, and the front porch of many southern states in America. The wide spread love and consumption of tea has created great passion among its consumers. A passion so large, that this warm beverage became the first mass commodity and has been the center of many great scandals, from the opium wars to the Boston Tea party protest. This incredible influential liquid will be brought to life through the Afternoon Tea that will be held December second. This tea will share the history of tea with a small group of people through a carefully prepared dinning experience. The dinning room will be a representation of the rituals of the classic English tea ceremony and the menu will embody the impact tea has had on Japan and China.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Jessie Husmann