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Capstone Projects

Reinvigoration of the Champlain-Adirondack Biosphere Reserve: Stakeholder Perceptions

Tue, 05/08/2018 - 15:02
Abstract: The Champlain-Adirondack Biosphere Reserve (CABR) was designated by the United Nations in 1989. This reserve spans the entire Adirondack Park, and includes the Lake Champlain Valley in Vermont as well. Biosphere reserves focus on conservation at a global level, and use international knowledge from lessons learned to best benefit each specific biosphere. Although CABR was designated in 1989, it became classified as inactive soon after. In 2016, Brian Houseal, Director of SUNY's College of Environmental Science and Forestry Newcomb Campus, prepared a periodic report to UNESCO on CABRs current status. The goal of this research was to determine the probability of stakeholder support to bring CABR out of inactivity, almost 20 years after it was designated originally. The research performed focused on stakeholders’ awareness and perceptions of the CABR, along with past indications of concerns and resistance among local residents. The research addresses this deficit and identifies and clarifies our representative’s samples perceptions of the designation. The research revealed that land use rights were still the major concern. The research revealed that this was still a concern because there is still a major lack of information on the CABR land classifications/land use rights. Information on CABR was concluded to be one of the largest challenges at this time. This research revealed that 68% of the residents were unaware of CABR until the periodic review was published in 2016, and over 40% of the residents had no idea what CABR was until they received an invite to come to the focus group.
Access: Yes
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Major: Arboriculture and Landscape Management, Parks and Conservation Management
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Coolidge Capstone 2018.docx
Authors: Nicholas Coolidge

Outward Bound semester: Skills to last a life time

Wed, 12/14/2016 - 10:44
Abstract: The focus of this study will examine the level at which an Outward Bound semester fosters personal growth, connection with nature, and hard skills. This particular Outward Bound semester course traveled from the Florida Keys then on to Costa Rica and Panama in Central America. The course focused on the water elements of sailing, surfing, whitewater rafting, scuba diving, and sea kayaking. Methods used include personal journal reflections, peer and instructors oral and written responses. The researcher was an active participant in the immersive experience and kept a journal of the entire experience trying to gather as much information about the course itself and reflecting on the research process throughout. This research indicated that this experience developed personal character and a connection with nature. These skills have an impact deeper than an isolated course with Outward Bound but can be transferred to daily life.
Access: Yes
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Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism, Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management, Parks, Recreation and Facilities Management
Year: 2016
Authors: Sam Annable

Initiatives to Increase Student Use of the Visitor Interpretive Center: A focus on marketing

Mon, 12/07/2015 - 09:18
Abstract: The focus of this study was on marketing the Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) to students and faculty with an overarching goal of increasing student use of the VIC. Through the study market research was conducted to identify the desired programming of the student body and methods of reaching students. Desired programs were then implemented and promoted alongside current programs. Program evaluations were conducted to assess the effectiveness of the marketing research and methods of promotion. Focus groups were held to allow a deeper insight on the preferences of different styles of promotion and the effectiveness of VIC brochures geared towards incoming students and faculty. The results of the study should be used in the future to increase communication between upper level management, and students and faculty regarding VIC resources and programming. The VIC is a resource for education, interpretation, and recreation that is underutilized and could be increasingly influential in the years to come.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2015
File Attachments:
Authors: Paige Buchholz

Removing Barriers: Student’s Use of the Paul Smith’s Visitor Interpretive Center

Tue, 12/08/2015 - 16:56
Abstract: The Paul Smith’s College’s Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) has been a staple in the lives of locals and tourists of the Adirondacks. The VIC offers nature-based recreational and educational programs year-round with the assistance of Paul Smith’s College’s students, faculty and staff. The purpose of this research is to take a deeper look into the present barriers preventing the Paul Smith’s College community (student, faculty and staff) from accessing and utilizing the VIC’s building and its trail system. A study was performed to discover barriers to accessing in the VIC area by utilizing surveys, focus groups, on-site visits, program implementation, trail register log, previous recreation capstones, and online resources. The results were analyzed to concentrate specific barriers. Most barriers involved programing, such as expanding current programs, as well as, offering new programs, followed by accessing the VIC, such as adequate signage and map interpretation, and finally access to general information, such as advertising and marketing. Using research from the past and present, this project gives suggestions that would better serve the PSC community by clarifying the needs and desires of the appropriate stakeholders associated with the VIC.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2015
Authors: Phillip Brandel

The Redevelopment of the Hiking Treks of BSA Camp Russell of the Revolutionary Trails Council

Mon, 04/22/2013 - 09:48
Abstract: High Adventure Programs are extremely important for Boy Scouts of America Councils. These programs do everything from hiking, biking, canoeing, kayaking, fishing, and rock climbing. Each council has their own unique programs specifically made for their area. For Camp Russell of White Lake, NY, redevelopment for part of their High Adventure Program is needed due to the being out of date: The Hiking Treks. New treks will be created with the help of trail mapping with a GPS unit, the ArcMap program, and online research. When all the data is collected, Camp Russell will be supplied with a map that shows many hiking trails within a reasonable driving distance. With this map, a manual will be created that zooms in to each hiking area that has the statistics of each hike. This map can be used by the Camp Russell staff for years to come.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Final_Withey.docx
Authors: Richard J. Withey

Green Roof Technologies in Adirondack Wilderness Areas

Fri, 04/26/2013 - 11:01
Abstract: Wilderness is qualified by two main characteristics: naturalness and solitude. To enhance these characteristics, many things are excluded from wilderness areas including roads, motorized vehicles and human-made structures of any kind. However some argue there needs to be greater consideration to structures that are a regional legacy and hold considerable historical significance. The Adirondack lean-to is a well-known entity associated with the Adirondack Park but much debate exists over whether or not such structures should be allowed in wilderness areas. The addition of green roofs to lean-tos can possibly mediate the humanness of these structures and produce a three-fold benefit. First, green roofs increase the naturalness of the lean-to. Second, they provide a model for naturalness and sustainability. Third, green roofs on lean-tos provide an additional benefit by lowering, however modestly, the impact of these structures on the natural environment. This qualitative study conducted a series of interviews to examine the feasibility and gauge the receptivity of stakeholders to this idea. Identified themes included the maintenance required to keep up the roofs, the cost and labor of installation and their longevity. Additional themes included the perceived lack of benefits, cultural and historical significance as well as the possibility of green-roofed lean-tos to provide an educational benefit. The data suggest that the benefits associated with green roofs on lean-tos may outweigh the cost of their installation. The naturalness of the green roof on the lean-t may thus offset the “unnaturalness” of the structures themselves to the degree that lean-tos may be perceived as more conforming to wilderness areas. This study concludes that further research is needed into the technical aspects of green roof construction including the amount of maintenance required and the use of wilderness compliant materials. The interest in green-roofed lean-tos appears to exist and with additional technical data it may be possible to take the next step.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2013
Authors: Alison Liedkie

Paul Smith's College Bouldering Guidebook

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 12:41
Abstract: The climbing community of Paul Smith’s College is rapidly expanding. Consequently, there are needs for an established set of climbing ethics (the informal guidelines that govern the development of new routes or climbing areas) and nearby places to practice climbing outdoors. To meet this need, a bouldering guidebook for the local area surrounding Paul Smith’s College that emphasizes ethical climbing practices will be produced. We will explore the woods that are within no more than a 10-minute drive from campus for glacial erratics that are suitable for bouldering. We will compile a set of at least 30 boulders that will be included in a guidebook and spend the spring, summer, and early fall of 2012 cleaning, developing, and documenting them. This guidebook will serve as a valuable resource for many future generations of climbers at Paul Smith’s College.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2012
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Dylan Shows, William Pregnall

An Investigation into the Pennsylvania Sunday Hunting Debate

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 14:17
Abstract: A current debate in Pennsylvania is taking place on the floor of the state congress and throughout small towns. Pennsylvania is one of eleven states that restrict Sunday hunting in some way. Recent bills have attempted to remove the blue law that currently restricts Sunday hunting in the state. Presently this attempt faces stiff opposition from famers, clergy, and other people who recreate outside. Most surprisingly though, is the large amount of varying opinion from hunters themselves on the Sunday hunting issue. This project will take an unbiased look into the Sunday hunting debate, and attempt to gain an understanding of why hunters have formed the opinions that they currently have. The project will then allow citizens of Pennsylvania to make a more informed decision on the issue of Sunday hunting.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2012
Authors: Robert J Edkin

Risk on the Rocks: A study of risk as related to self efficacy in rock climbing

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 15:50
Abstract: Self efficacy is being confident in ones skills or ability to perform a task and may be directly linked to risk in relation to rock climbing. Risk is exposing oneself to danger that can cause you threat loss or harm. The purpose of this project is to see if there is a direct correlation between the risks that rock climbers take and their experience level. A goal sample of 100 rock climbers will partake in a survey asking questions that will help to estimate confidence, age, gender and risk taking behaviors in climbers. This study hopes to show that climbers are more willing to take risks when they are more confident in their experiences. The significance of this study will be useful to the climbing community as a whole because very little research has been conducted on this specific area of climbing.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Risk on the Rocks Capstone
Authors: Matthew Baer

Inclusive Recreation Programming: Pilot Programming at John Dillon Park

Tue, 12/04/2012 - 13:59
Abstract: This project developed pilot inclusive recreation programming for the users of John Dillon Park. From conducting a needs assessment of the park visitors we discovered what kinds of outdoor inclusive recreation visitors would most want to participate in. With this information, three programs were developed and implemented: Camp Cookery and Crafts, Neature Walk, and Halloween-To Fright Fest. Surveys of program participants were done before and after they participated in the programs in order to evaluate changes in well being indicators such as stress, anxiety, the sense of inclusion, and visit satisfaction. Results obtained were not reliable due to a low sample size but showed improvements in all areas. The scrap book pages and comments made by participants indicated that the programs were beneficial to them and should be continued in the future.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2012
Authors: Abigail Hughes, Sean Frantz