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Capstone Projects

Presence and Abundance of Microplastics within Flowing Waters of Private, Wilderness, and Other Forest Preserve Lands of the Northern Adirondack Park

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 16:26
Abstract: Microplastic sampling was conducted at thirteen locations throughout the water bodies of the Northern Adirondack Region. Plastics were found at all thirteen sites, which were categorized by the impact level of human development. Any particle less than 5mm can be defined as a microplastic particle. Microscopic plastics can be found in a variety of chemical cleaners, clothing fabrics, and concrete solutions. Storm water drainage systems and wastewater treatment plants are confirmed sources of microplastic pollution, which carry pollutants into our rivers, lakes, and streams. Ingestion of microplastic particles can lead to many distinctive threats, including biological and physical abnormalities, while possibly leading to bioaccumulation and biomagnification throughout the food web. Future practices for management and prevention of microplastic pollutants in the Adirondacks is critical for environmental protection, while also portraying a worldly view of an overlooked human induced issue.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2014
Authors: Patrick Colern, Sinjin Larson

Environmental Values Represented in Successful Green Building; LEED vs. Passive House

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 12:02
Abstract: In a society struggling to synchronize human development with environmental quality, the construction sector is often the target of sustainability initiatives. The purpose of this research is to investigate the environmental values and themes that influenced the design process of two successful green building projects. The two buildings at the focus of the study are new residential construction in the state of Maine; one with LEED Platinum certification and one with Passive House certification. Both buildings were found to exemplify themes of energy performance, practicality, and bioregionalism and included a collaborative design effort. A better understanding of these themes and values that guided these project teams to construct paradigm-shifting structures can help form a model for mainstream applications of a sustainable built environment.
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Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Studies
Year: 2014
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Heather Coleates

Driftwood Suites and Conference Services

Mon, 05/05/2014 - 19:00
Abstract: These are the reports of the original business plan for Driftwood Suites and four year analyses of the Hospitality Business Simulation Course. Driftwood Suites and Conference Services is located on the beautiful shores of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. This property is located 30 minutes away from the nearest airport. Driftwood Suites and Conference Services is the perfect location for business travelers and leisure travelers. Driftwood Suites currently has 125 air-conditioned rooms, all with private bathrooms and is well equipped to accommodate business travelers which is the main demographic of the property. Surrounding the property is an enclosed garden and a 200 car parking lot adjacent to the hotel. The products and services at Driftwood Suites that are offered are a new conference center, business services, and quick check in and check out. This property has a data point for email and internet access, level three complimentary items, and level four in room entertainment. In addition to the existing services such as 24 hour front desk servicers, lobby lounge, a full service restaurant called the Shipwreck Restaurant with a total of 100 seats, and a Pub style bar called the Pearl Pub with snack services and an additional bar called the Sea Glass Bar.
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Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Victoria Gonzalez

HOS 462 Hospitality Business Simulation Capstone

Mon, 05/05/2014 - 08:30
Abstract: This capstone was an simulation of the hotel business. The reports in this file are a business plan and analyses reports for the four years that we were asked to make operational decisions for. This class looks at everything involved with the operation of a hotel through the simulation of an fictional hotel that a group of students get to name and make all operating decisions for. Everything that has been learned through the time at Paul Smiths College is put to use when operating the hotel simulation.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2014
Authors: James Panza

A MULTI-SCALE EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF FOREST HARVESTING FOR WOODY BIOFUELS ON MAMMALIAN COMMUNITIES IN A NORTHERN HARDWOOD FOREST

Fri, 02/01/2013 - 16:19
Abstract: Forest harvesting and subsequent effects on forest structure have been shown to influence mammalian community assemblages and the abundance of individual species, however less attention has been paid to the implications of how harvested timber is used. This is particularly relevant in the Northern Forest, where a considerable portion of the forest harvesting is used to produce biofuels. Biofuels harvesting typically involves the process of whole-tree chipping which may lead to a dramatic reduction in the amount of woody material in the form of slash and coarse woody debris (CWD) left in harvested stands. The goal of our study was to assess the effects of biofuels harvesting on forest structure and subsequent effects on mammalian community structure and abundance. To address this goal, we focused on a ~35 Ha area of partially-harvested northern hardwood forest in the northern Adirondacks, New York. To sample mammals we used a combination of Sherman traps and track plates established at two scales across stands within this area. Our results showed that the response of small mammals to changes in forest structure is both species and scale specific. At the individual trap scale, CWD, slash, and understory cover were important drivers of the occurrence of individual species of small mammals. At the larger “grid” scale, small mammal relative abundance was driven by canopy cover and the density of woody stems. Our results indicate that the current harvesting practices used for biofuel production in the Adirondacks are unlikely to result in declines in abundance of common small mammal species. However, the retention of some slash post-harvest may be beneficial to some species, thus foresters may want to include slash retention when developing silvicultural prescriptions.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2012
Authors: Cody Laxton, Alisha Benack, Danielle Ball, Scott Collins, Sam Forlenza, Richard Franke, Stephanie Korzec, Alec Judge, Connor Langevin, Jonathan Vimislik, Elena Zito

Soil and Vegetation Characteristics of High Elevation Wetlands in the Adirondack Park

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 17:14
Abstract: Wetland ecosystems are finally being understood for their true importance. Wetlands in the past were misunderstood and thought to be disease carrying burdens on our way of life; however this mentality changed during the mid-19thcentury. These ecosystems are important for biodiversity and act as natural water purification systems. This study was undertaken to help understand, the high elevation wetland characteristics. Our goals were to analyze the soils and describe the vegetation in high elevation wetlands. The soil and vegetative surveys helped define the characteristics of these ecosystems and create a better understanding of them. The combination of vegetation species that are wetland indicators were found in each site, the soil pH, and nutrients show that each site had signs of being a wetland community.
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Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Forestry
Year: 2012
File Attachments: FINAL Capstone Report.doc
Authors: Brandon Ploss, Sean Ayotte

Managing for increased productivity and size of an American kestrel (Falco sparverius) population in northern New York

Mon, 05/07/2012 - 12:58
Abstract: American kestrel (Falco sparverius) populations have recently declined across most of the eastern states. As a result, managers and concerned citizens alike have installed nest boxes across large areas to increase productivity. Mr. Mark Manske has run one of these nest box programs in northern New York, across parts of St. Lawrence and Franklin counties, over the past ten years. Through the combination of his research and other long term management plans, the ideal future plan was developed. The focus of the new plan is to boost efficiency of resources, ease of expansion and sustain a steady or increasing population of kestrels. GIS software was used to analyze each nest boxes’ characteristics in order to develop a model that may predict areas of possible high productivity. Surveys and public outreach are emphasized to create a broader supporting base and possibly acquire future partners for land use, volunteers and advertising. The continued monitoring of the northern New York kestrel population will ensure the presence of this vital species for generations to come.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Sauca_Final_Submision.docx
Authors: Tonnie Sauca Jr.

From House to Home

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 20:59
Abstract: In 2011, baby boomers began reaching the age of retirement; a trend that will continue for the next twenty years. This generation is healthier, wealthier, and more educated than their predecessors, which presents an opportunity for the assisted living industry. Assisted living facilities offer more independence and fewer restrictions than nursing homes which is appealing to those who only need help completing daily tasks. The Adirondacks have potential to play a significant role as a retirement destination. The purpose of this study is to determine what brought baby boomers to assisted living facilities in the Adirondacks. Semi-structured surveys will be used to obtain the needed information. This information will ultimately help assisted living facilities in the Adirondack region market to future baby boomers.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: House to Home.doc
Authors: Mallory Kasey Fleishman

Bringing Families Back to the Drive-In

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 17:55
Abstract: Drive-in theaters have been in existence since 1933. However, within the past 30 years the number has been declining. Now there are indications that they have been making a comeback. The number of operating drive-in theaters went from 366 in 2011 to 368 this year according to drive-ins.com. This study seeks to determine how drive-in theater can appeal to families, and how they may best cultivate their comeback. The opinions of both families and drive-in theater owners will be gathered through the use of surveys. The results will be used to determine what steps drive-in theater owners will take to attract more families back to the drive-in theater also what features families would want available at the drive-in theater. The long term goal is help the family become a unit.
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Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Eric Kowalik

Rising to the Top: A study of upscale properties and the attributes they value in potential employees

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 22:07
Abstract: In upscale, luxury based, hotel properties customer service is essential. Properties require new hires to participate in management training programs. Specific knowledge, skills and abilities are essential to gain entry into these programs. This descriptive study seeks to discover how upscale management training programs rank these attributes in potential employees. This study will use a web-based survey instrument. Data will be analyzed in aggregate to identify common requirements. This study may be valuable to baccalaureate hospitality programs and students interested in identifying the value upscale properties place on knowledge, skills and abilities of potential employees.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: DEMEYER FINAL CAPSTONE.docx
Authors: Mitchell DeMeyer