After logging in with the login link in the top right, click here to upload your Capstone

Capstone Projects

Monitoring the Zebra Mussel Invasion Front: Use of New Technology

Thu, 02/09/2012 - 15:39
Abstract: Zebra mussels are invasive mollusks that are affecting the well-being of the water bodies in the United States. This study uses environmental DNA (eDNA) is a sensitive early detection system that may be useful in monitoring their spread. The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of eDNA technology in identifying infested water bodies, to determine if zebra mussel DNA is in the Adirondack water bodies not known to be infested, if the water chemistry of these water bodies is favorable for zebra mussel establishment, and if the eDNA technology is transferable to an institution like Paul Smith’s College. Eighteen lakes, all in New York State were sampled, fifteen of which are located in the Adirondack Park. DNA was extracted from water and plankton samples and species specific primers were used for PCR amplification to determine if zebra mussel DNA was present. Of seven samples taken from sites known to be infested, five of these tested positive for zebra mussel eDNA. Four lakes not known to be infested within the Park also tested positive for zebra mussel eDNA. Based on zebra mussel risk parameters (water chemistry) applied to 1,469 Adirondack water bodies, less than 3% are at risk of zebra mussel establishment. However it is possible that established populations could occur at microsites that may have locally high levels of calcium and higher pH.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Environmental Sciences, Environmental Studies, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2011
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Alexandria Bevilacqua, John Bishop, Charles Cain, Tyler Clark, Seth Crevison, Robert Culyer, Ryan Deibler, Brian DeMeo, Jonathan Eckert, Kirsten Goranowski, Joelle Guisti, Alan Jancef, Korinna Marino, Michelle Melagrano, KaitlynNedo, Joseph Nelson, Aaron Palmieri, Cole Reagan, John Scahill, JohnathanStrassheim, Scott Travis, Sarah Van Nostrand and Sarah Vella

Extreme Local: Weighing the Financials of Growing Produce On-Premise

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 16:31
Abstract: Restaurant owners across the United States create revenue by limiting their food costs. As the demand for locally grown, organic produce rises, these individuals find it increasingly difficult to offer these comparatively expensive ingredients without raising prices or facing an increase in food cost percentage. This study aims to discover the financial benefits and risks of growing organic produce on-premise, an alternative to buying these ingredients. Comparing the cost of gardening to the perceived value of its product, a financial analysis will assess the return on perfectly ripened, fresh ingredients. The findings will be used to determine the viability of small scale on-premise gardening in any small to medium sized restaurant.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2011
File Attachments: Brandon Bills Capstone.docx
Authors: Brandon Bills

How Local Can You Go?

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 17:01
Abstract: With the ever-increasing interest in and utilization of locally sourced products in food-service establishments, it makes sense for the “green”-striving Paul Smith’s College to bring these efforts to the dining room. The St. Regis Café claims, “We buy local when ever possible and support our regional agriculture as a standard professional practice.” This project will determine to what extent this claim is followed through on, while taking into consideration the required standards of the learning environment in the St. Regis Café. By establishing contact through e-mail with selected farmers and producers, this research will explore what percentage of the menu items could be sourced within a certain region. The resulting information will provide the St. Regis Café with the basis of information regarding product availability, should they be interested in pursuing this option.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2011
File Attachments: Capstone project.docx
Authors: Kelcey Rusch

Self-Actualization through the use of Food

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 17:16
Abstract: Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs is a table consisting of human needs according to necessity; in order to reach a new level, needs of the previous level must be met first. Among the physiological needs located at the bottom of the pyramid, is food. Food can be controlled unlike other biological needs and therefore may play a crucial role in reaching the ultimate goal of self-actualization. The surveys will be conducted to gather statistics and opinions of outdoor recreationists and other professionals who pertain to this study. The question that is going to be answered through this capstone is: Is food preparation and consumption an enriching and exciting enough experience to achieve self-actualization?
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2011
Authors: Stephanie Curtis

Accommodation for the Deaf culture in hotels and recreational facilities

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 18:18
Abstract: Hotels and recreational facilities do not always have adequate accommodations, to help the Deaf culture communicate with the hearing world and take advantage of special services. Hotels and recreational facilities are improving their accommodation but more can be done to meet the needs for this demographic. This study will research what services are already available for the Deaf culture in hotels and recreational facilities. The outcome will determine what the Deaf culture prefers in accommodations, what hotels and recreation facilities offer, and new accommodations. This will help not only the Deaf culture, but everyone by breaking the language barrier between hearing and Deaf. The Deaf culture can benefit by utilizing new technology to have a more enjoyable experience at hotels and recreational facilities.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2011
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Virginia Schertel, Allison Moscato

Cheers To Upscaling Beer With A Cicerone

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 18:53
Abstract: The Cicerone Certification Program has been around only since 2007 but has already given out thousands of Certified Beer Server certificates. The Cicerone Certification Program seeks to ensure that consumers receive the best possible beer and enjoy its flavors to the greatest extent possible. Those who are qualified must know five areas of beer. These areas of knowledge are beer storage, sales and service, beer styles and culture, beer tasting and flavors, brewing ingredients and processes, and pairing beer with food. The program offers three levels of certification beginning with the simplest and building to the most complex and demanding. The three levels of a Cicerone are Certified Beer Server, Certified Cicerone, and Master Cicerone. This study seeks to determine if a Cicerone is needed in an upscale restaurant. The opinion of beverage managers’ will be gathered through the use of interviews. The consensus will be used to determine if it is even worth having a Cicerone in upscale restaurants.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2011
File Attachments: Capstone-Project.docx
Authors: Stephen Angrisano

Rooftop Gardens

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 19:26
Abstract: The term “local” has very little meaning, if you are surrounded by miles of asphalt and sidewalks. However, the term “rooftop garden” can have a strong and powerful meaning when the only farming space you have is the roof above you. This study seeks to determine if there is a difference between rooftop garden grown food and mass produced and transported food in visual appearance and to determine what are the consumer assumptions and perceptions about a restaurant rooftop garden. The data for this study will be gathered through the use of secondary research and surveys. This information will then be used to determine the differences between vegetables picked at peak ripeness from a rooftop garden and vegetables delivered from a large scale mass producer. In addition the consensus will be used to see if the use of a rooftop garden has any affect on a customer’s perception of an urban restaurant with a rooftop garden.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2011
File Attachments: capstone.docx
Authors: Alexander Benson

A Healthier Lunch Line

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 19:57
Abstract: Unhealthy eating is an epidemic in America that is passing from generation to generation. It is becoming more crucial to find ways that can change eating habits at a young age due to the influx of marketing influences. This study will show whether educational marketing or aesthetic marketing is more effective on children’s food choices. The educational marketing will be implemented by interactive taste testing with the students, while the aesthetic marketing will be done by encouraging healthy eating with various wall illustrations and posters in the cafeteria. Both sets of data will be gathered before and after to be compared for effectiveness. Schools are currently struggling to find a way to encourage healthy eating with food that is appealing to a grade school student. If the presentation of food is part of a solution, then this study can help prove that simple changes to the cafeteria setting can reinforce children’s perception of health and help fight obesity and other health issues.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management, Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2011
Authors: Amiee Derzanovich, Morgan Horwatt

Refining Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis) restoration efforts by comparing captive rearing and release methods used in the Albany Pine Bush

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 18:36
Abstract: With this research, the release efforts of the endangered Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis) of the Albany Pine Bush (APB) in New York State at two different stages of the butterfly’s life cycle were compared. Survival success rates were determined and environmental factors were measured to assess captive rearing methods and improve restoration efforts in the APB Preserve. Captive rearing efforts have been used in the past in this area, releasing Karner blue butterfly pupae into the wild; however, this year in 2011, pupae were allowed to eclose from their chrysalides in the lab and were released into the wild as adult butterflies. The analysis of the information gathered showed that the release of Karner blue butterflies in the adult stage offered a greater survival rate over release in the pupal stage. The average daily maximum temperatures increased each year during the summers of 2009-2011. Information from this research is important to help prevent the extirpation of this species from the Albany Pine Bush Recovery Unit and may be helpful to organizations such as the US Fish and Wildlife Services and the Nature Conservancy.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences
Year: 2011
File Attachments: CapstoneFINAL.doc
Authors: Chelsea Sendzik

Promoting Conservation of Biodiversity in the Adirondack Park Through Understanding and Engaging Stakeholders

Thu, 02/09/2012 - 11:31
Abstract: Anthropogenic disturbance of natural environments has led to the widespread loss of native biodiversity and degradation of ecosystems. It is increasingly recognized that addressing this “biodiversity crisis” entails understanding the societal drivers of unsustainable patterns of use. Conservation psychology is a new discipline that specifically focuses on understanding the linkages between human behavior and action and promoting a healthy and sustainable relationship between humans and nature. In this project, we employed principles of conservation psychology with the goal of improving the efficacy and efficiency of conservation of biodiversity in the Adirondack Park (AP). To meet this goal we employed three specific strategies. The first of these strategies was the use of surveys to assess the values, attitudes, and actions different stakeholders have in regards to conservation of biodiversity in the AP. These surveys were disseminated via both direct mailings and online, and included 30 questions. Our second strategy was to use discourse analysis to create a dictionary of terms and phrases employed in a positive, neutral, and negative light in regard to conservation of biodiversity. This entailed analysis of 30 emic accounts derived from opinion articles written by stakeholders in the AP, as well as analysis of a number of etic accounts drawn from online sources. Our third strategy was to use conservation psychology literature to assess ways in which the presentation of information and peer-dynamics influenced the responses of stakeholders towards conservation of biodiversity. Using the combination of these three strategies, we were able to provide a holistic understanding of how different stakeholders in the AP perceive and act towards biodiversity conservation; identify language that can be used to illicit a more positive response from these stakeholders; and identify specific tools based on principles of psychology that can encourage more active and effective engagement in conservation of biodiversity by different stakeholders. Our research findings will allow groups focusing on promoting conservation of biodiversity in the AP to be more effective and efficient in their work in the future.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2011
Authors: Christopher Critelli, John Ghanime, Derek Johnson, Samantha Lambert, Justin Luyk, Matthew Parker, Robert Vite, Heather Mason, Jesse Warner, Ethan Lennox, Sarah Robbiano, David Mathis, David A. Patrick