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Capstone Projects

Engaging Visitors Of Glenview Preserve With Interpretive Signage

Fri, 12/14/2018 - 11:42
Abstract: Glenview Preserve is a Lowland forest and Field property that boarders the Bloomingdale Bog. Implementing an educational system at the preserve would lead to more public interaction that would guarantee support for the Adirondack Land Trust’s mission objectives. This approach would involve the development of an interpretive day-use site, interpretive programs and signs, and an outdoor education space. For my portion I will be investigating how the Adirondack Land Trust can construct interpretive signage that is weather resistant and provides valuable content. The quality of the content will be evaluated using the National Association of Interpretation principles of POETRY. These signs will promote ALT’s mission objectives by encouraging people to make a difference after their visit through well-constructed and entertaining information. Visitors will donate money to ensure that having an educational system at the preserve is a leading concern of the Adirondack Land Trust’s management plan for Glenview Preserve.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Integrative Studies, Natural Resources Conservation and Management, Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management, Parks and Conservation Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Tiffany Elizabeth Marie Clark

Student of Natural Resources and Conservation Management

Fall 2018 graduate of Paul Smith's College

Promoting Conservation of Biodiversity in the Adirondack Park Through Understanding and Engaging Stakeholders

Thu, 02/09/2012 - 11:31
Abstract: Anthropogenic disturbance of natural environments has led to the widespread loss of native biodiversity and degradation of ecosystems. It is increasingly recognized that addressing this “biodiversity crisis” entails understanding the societal drivers of unsustainable patterns of use. Conservation psychology is a new discipline that specifically focuses on understanding the linkages between human behavior and action and promoting a healthy and sustainable relationship between humans and nature. In this project, we employed principles of conservation psychology with the goal of improving the efficacy and efficiency of conservation of biodiversity in the Adirondack Park (AP). To meet this goal we employed three specific strategies. The first of these strategies was the use of surveys to assess the values, attitudes, and actions different stakeholders have in regards to conservation of biodiversity in the AP. These surveys were disseminated via both direct mailings and online, and included 30 questions. Our second strategy was to use discourse analysis to create a dictionary of terms and phrases employed in a positive, neutral, and negative light in regard to conservation of biodiversity. This entailed analysis of 30 emic accounts derived from opinion articles written by stakeholders in the AP, as well as analysis of a number of etic accounts drawn from online sources. Our third strategy was to use conservation psychology literature to assess ways in which the presentation of information and peer-dynamics influenced the responses of stakeholders towards conservation of biodiversity. Using the combination of these three strategies, we were able to provide a holistic understanding of how different stakeholders in the AP perceive and act towards biodiversity conservation; identify language that can be used to illicit a more positive response from these stakeholders; and identify specific tools based on principles of psychology that can encourage more active and effective engagement in conservation of biodiversity by different stakeholders. Our research findings will allow groups focusing on promoting conservation of biodiversity in the AP to be more effective and efficient in their work in the future.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2011
Authors: Christopher Critelli, John Ghanime, Derek Johnson, Samantha Lambert, Justin Luyk, Matthew Parker, Robert Vite, Heather Mason, Jesse Warner, Ethan Lennox, Sarah Robbiano, David Mathis, David A. Patrick

How has Guiding Changed in the Adirondacks?

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 16:24
Abstract: Adirondack guides have been leading visitors through the Adirondack wilderness since the first big tourism boom in the late 1800’s. This study will discover how the guiding industry in the Adirondacks has changed over the years. Questionnaires will be sent to local Adirondack guides and compared with interviews documented from early Adirondack guides from the 1800’s. The questionnaires will measure the differences and similarities between the past and present guides and their services. This study will provide information to the Adirondack guiding industry on what they can do in anticipation of changes in this industry.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2011
Authors: Jenna Lute

Christian Growth Retreats as a Vehicle for Establishing Sustainable Spiritual Practice

Tue, 12/13/2011 - 14:46
Abstract: Abstract The goal of this project was to determine if the four basic Christian practices – prayer, fellowship, meditation, and scripture reading – are useful for providing a foundation for a sustainable spiritual enrichment and growth. This project took phenomenological approach in determining the results and findings from the data collected. A questionnaire was given to each participant to complete at the end of a one day retreat to record their impressions, experiences, and perceptions of the four practices. Also, a survey was conducted at two mainline denominational churches to compare results with the retreat participant group. The results of the research show that the majority of the participants do engage the four spiritual practices on ongoing bases. The themes that emerged from the four practices show how the practices are perceived as an enriching experience that supports spiritual growth.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2011
File Attachments: Capstone last Intro.docx
Authors: Wilbert Gamble