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Capstone Projects

An Assessment of Heavy Metal Concentrations in Adirondack Waterfowl

Thu, 04/28/2016 - 22:53
Abstract: We analyzed heavy metal concentrations in waterfowl liver and breast tissue from ducks harvested within the Adirondack Park from October 3 to November 13, 2015. Interspecific, intersex, and feeding behavior variation in heavy metal concentrations were assessed. Waterfowl from two feeding behavior groups (diving and dabbling) were harvested from the watershed within a 50 mile radius of Paul Smith’s, New York. Harvested waterfowl species included mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), American black duck (Anas rubripes), common merganser (Mergus merganser), ring-necked duck (Aythya collaris), bufflehead (Bucephala albeola), and hooded merganser (Lophodytes cucullatus). Legal harvest of these species during regulated New York State duck hunting season allows for permissible use of internal organs for heavy metal determination. Dry weight (mg/kg) of digested liver and breast tissue samples were analyzed using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Due to unknown laboratory error, absolute concentration values were inaccurate, thus, rendering accurate analyses unfeasible. However, relative observable trends were able to be assessed given our data’s high precision. Analyte concentrations were significantly greater in liver tissues and there were significant differences between species. Variation in mercury, lead, bismuth, cadmium, chromium, and zinc concentrations in waterfowl serve as an indicator of the presence, cycling, bioaccumulation, and temporal trends of these metals in northeastern aquatic habitats.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2016
File Attachments: Final2.docx
Authors: Brandon Snavely, Lewis Lolya

Roots of Paul Smith’s - Interpreting Our Past to Inspire Our Future : A conceptual design for an interpretive trail guide exhibit on Paul Smith’s College campus

Tue, 05/10/2016 - 13:17
Abstract: It is a pivotal time for Paul Smith’s College (PSC) where many of those directly involved with its inception are no long with us. PSC history was shaped by the Adirondack wilderness and together they influence how the college is run today. This project aimed to create the conceptual design for an interpretive trail exhibit on PSC campus. I worked with a professional exhibit designer to develop artistically inspired signage using archival photos to bring to life the heritage and natural history of the Paul Smith’s. Extensive research, input from stakeholders, and professional design guidance were utilized to create the content for six interpretive signs, a conceptual design, two formative evaluations, an estimated budget, and two campus sustainability fund proposals. These signs are meant to engage and inspire the current and future members of the Paul Smith’s College community, to build a deeper appreciation for the heritage that makes us unique.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2016
Authors: Leanne Ketner

Paul Smith's Car Sharing Program: A feasibility study of implementing a car-sharing program at Paul Smiths

Mon, 04/22/2013 - 16:21
Abstract: Car-sharing is a program in which companies own a fleet of vehicles, insure them, maintain them, and offer memberships to people who wish to use them. Car-sharing is an eco-friendly way to use a vehicle when needed without the need to own one. These programs are environmentally friendly as well as cost effective. Paul Smith’s college is an environmentally friendly campus currently lacking an effective program to reduce emissions on campus. In addition to the absence of an efficient program to reduce emissions, Paul Smith’s College is experiencing a shortage of parking spots due to the excessive number of vehicles parked here. In effort to take further steps towards being an environmentally friendly campus and reduce the number of vehicles parked on campus, a feasibility study to implement a car-sharing program on Paul Smith’s College campus will be conducted.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies, Integrative Studies
Year: 2013
File Attachments: draft4.4.doc
Authors: Ray Honsinger, Lance Ryan

Alternative Management Methods for Acid Deposition in Lakes

Fri, 04/26/2013 - 18:09
Abstract: Acid deposition has been causing the acidification of lakes in the Northeast United States for decades. The result is lake ecosystems with abnormally low pH that stresses the organisms that live there. Management plans in place in the Adirondack Park have been working to remediate acidified lakes for the past few decades. Limestone (CaCO3) has been the generally accepted method for managing these lakes, in an attempt restore the lakes pre-impacted conditions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of liming in reversing the effects of acidification, and to identify effective alternatives. Five alternatives were tested against limestone: Sodium carbonate (Na2CO3), Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), Sodium acetate (CH3COONa), Magnesium carbonate (MgCO3), and Potassium carbonate (K2CO3). Double End-Point Titration tests were performed on all of the compounds, using both distilled water and lake water, to determine the relative alkalinity of each compound. Alkalinity is the measure of the ability of a solution to neutralize acid, also known as its "buffering capacity." Lake water was used in the titration tests in an attempt to mimic in-situ testing. The results of the titrations showed limestone proving to be the most effective in the lake water tests, with Magnesium carbonate and Potassium carbonate ranked closely behind. While limestone has proven to be an effective management method, its reliability is dependent upon the characteristics of the lake catchment, making it important to continue to look for alternative solutions.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences
Year: 2013
Authors: Derek Scott

Conveyor Belt Sushi Restaurants: A study of customer knowledge and perceived benefit of technological management systems within conveyor belt sushi restaurants

Mon, 04/22/2013 - 15:42
Abstract: Radio frequency identification management systems are used by conveyor belt sushi restaurants to ensure the freshness of sushi they provide to customers. The workers within these restaurants feel the systems improve business but whether the customers, who are imperative in a restaurant’s success, are aware of them and what benefits they perceive is still undefined. The purpose of this study is to determine how and to what extent the knowledge and perceived benefits of RFID systems in conveyor belt restaurants affect customer satisfaction. This qualitative study focuses on the relationship between technological management systems and customer satisfaction as it pertains to freshness. A method of voluntary surveys will be used in this study to measure the knowledge and perceived benefits from frequent sushi consumers dining within a conveyor belt sushi restaurant, as well as online using social media sites. The survey results will be compiled and used to determine the percentage of consumers who are aware of these systems, whether they believe they are beneficial and how satisfied they feel knowing the restaurant uses it. This study will assist sushi restaurant owners in understanding how their customers perceive these systems and potentially furthering their business.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Miller_finalcapstone.pdf
Authors: Heather Miller