After logging in with the login link in the top right, click here to upload your Capstone

Capstone Projects

Reinvigoration of the Champlain-Adirondack Biosphere Reserve: Stakeholder Perceptions

Tue, 05/08/2018 - 15:02
Abstract: The Champlain-Adirondack Biosphere Reserve (CABR) was designated by the United Nations in 1989. This reserve spans the entire Adirondack Park, and includes the Lake Champlain Valley in Vermont as well. Biosphere reserves focus on conservation at a global level, and use international knowledge from lessons learned to best benefit each specific biosphere. Although CABR was designated in 1989, it became classified as inactive soon after. In 2016, Brian Houseal, Director of SUNY's College of Environmental Science and Forestry Newcomb Campus, prepared a periodic report to UNESCO on CABRs current status. The goal of this research was to determine the probability of stakeholder support to bring CABR out of inactivity, almost 20 years after it was designated originally. The research performed focused on stakeholders’ awareness and perceptions of the CABR, along with past indications of concerns and resistance among local residents. The research addresses this deficit and identifies and clarifies our representative’s samples perceptions of the designation. The research revealed that land use rights were still the major concern. The research revealed that this was still a concern because there is still a major lack of information on the CABR land classifications/land use rights. Information on CABR was concluded to be one of the largest challenges at this time. This research revealed that 68% of the residents were unaware of CABR until the periodic review was published in 2016, and over 40% of the residents had no idea what CABR was until they received an invite to come to the focus group.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Arboriculture and Landscape Management, Parks and Conservation Management
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Coolidge Capstone 2018.docx
Authors: Nicholas Coolidge

Engaging Visitors Of Glenview Preserve With Interpretive Signage

Fri, 12/14/2018 - 11:42
Abstract: Glenview Preserve is a Lowland forest and Field property that boarders the Bloomingdale Bog. Implementing an educational system at the preserve would lead to more public interaction that would guarantee support for the Adirondack Land Trust’s mission objectives. This approach would involve the development of an interpretive day-use site, interpretive programs and signs, and an outdoor education space. For my portion I will be investigating how the Adirondack Land Trust can construct interpretive signage that is weather resistant and provides valuable content. The quality of the content will be evaluated using the National Association of Interpretation principles of POETRY. These signs will promote ALT’s mission objectives by encouraging people to make a difference after their visit through well-constructed and entertaining information. Visitors will donate money to ensure that having an educational system at the preserve is a leading concern of the Adirondack Land Trust’s management plan for Glenview Preserve.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Integrative Studies, Natural Resources Conservation and Management, Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management, Parks and Conservation Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Tiffany Elizabeth Marie Clark

Student of Natural Resources and Conservation Management

Fall 2018 graduate of Paul Smith's College

PROPOSED DAY-USE SITE AT THE ADIRONDACK LAND TRUST GLENVIEW PRESERVE

Fri, 12/14/2018 - 15:43
Abstract: Glenview Preserve is a lowland mix deciduous forest that boarders the Bloomingdale Bog. The property would be a quintessential location for public engagement through a day-use site, which in turn would ensure future use and elevation of the Adirondack Land Trust and their mission objectives. Through the determined design goals and the predetermined ALT goals for the property a comprehensive blueprint has been presented. The proposed day-use site is predicted to increase the three essential services that communities in the Adirondacks thrive off of. Their economic value, health and environmental benefits, and their social importance streamlines with the ALT’s management practices and goals to provide a beneficial educational and recreational space for the community.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Parks and Conservation Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Nathan Smith

Promoting ALT Awareness & Mission Objectives Through Interpretation on the Glenview Property

Fri, 12/14/2018 - 21:44
Abstract: The Adirondack Land Trust (ALT) purchased the Glenview property in October of 2016 for a discounted price of $98,000 in conjunction with the promise to preserve the scenic vista for which this property is well known. The 238-acre property located on NY State Route 86 is a popular roadside vista near Donnelly’s Ice Cream Stand that draws many visitors. The ALT not only wishes to preserve the scenic vista but several important features of the property. These include pollinator habitat, wetland ecosystems, and maple syrup production. It is believed that awareness of these important characteristics and the ALT can be increased through meaningful and relevant public engagement on the Glenview property. What follows is part of a larger plan for an interpretive nature center located on the site. This paper outlines what interpretation is, why interpretation is important, and how interpretation on the Glenview property can be used to promote the ALT mission objectives.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management
Year: 2018
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Josh Beuschlein

Jenkins Mountain Backcountry Ski Glade

Wed, 05/09/2018 - 11:34
Abstract: The Paul Smith's College VIC is able to revitalize the ski glade on the back of Jenkins Mountain. The terrain was abandoned after a lack of interest, but now has opportunity to regain popularity. This study looks at land maintenance, risk management and marketing techniques to make the project successful. Putting these studies into action can benefit the VIC as well as the college, whether it's utilized for a students education or a visitors leisure. Bringing backcountry skiing to the property is a great addition to the many attractions provided by the land.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Cody Dennis , Austin Stergas, Scott Smith

A Look at Risk Management at the VIC

Wed, 05/09/2018 - 14:22
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the current Risk Management Plan (RMP) at the Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC). The paper examines how the current RMP functions at the VIC and also discussed some of the RMP practices at Paul Smith's College. The assets that the VIC currently has are discussed. Potential templates for RMP’s at the VIC are proposed and aspects that could specifically help the VIC are discussed. The purpose for a comprehensive RMP is discussed in a literature review, giving a base for why an RMP is important and beneficial to an organization like the VIC.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Mackenzie Wollert, Joshua Meeske

Flight of 5 Food Truck Company

Tue, 04/26/2016 - 10:16
Abstract: The Flight of Five Food Truck Company is run by Catherine Bergman and her colleague Malik Pryce. They are both hard working and determined business workers. Catherine Bergman has her degree in Food Service and Beverage Management and Culinary Arts and Malik Pryce has worked in many restaurants where he has been on his way into a management position and has been working with Catherine since 2015. The Flight of Five Food Truck Company is located and run in Lockport New York. Where weIt has a plan on selling items named after local colleges’ and universities’ names and mascots. The Flight of Five Food Truck Company is named after the 5 five locks on the Erie Canal, we and this company wanted to have a historical tie in to our business and the town.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2016
File Attachments: Flight of FIve final.docx
Authors: Catherine Bergman

Jenkins Café

Wed, 04/27/2016 - 07:25
Abstract: Jenkins’ Café will be a quick service café establishment located at the base of Jenkins Mountain, along the trail systems of the Visitor’s Interpretive Center (VIC). The VIC has recently become an entity of Paul Smith’s College, allowing greater flexibility of management, away from State jurisdiction. About three miles into the VIC’s trail system is the base of Jenkins’ Mountain, the location for Jenkins’ Café. Jenkins’ Café will serve local residents, Paul Smith’s College students, and VIC visitors’ quick meals consisting of sandwiches, soups, and salads while they utilize the VIC trails. Warm and cold beverages will also be available for service, including a small selection of beer and wine. Hikers, cross-country skiers, bird watchers, snowmobilers, and anyone participating in any VIC activities, can enjoy these fares when they arrive at Jenkins’ Café.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2016
File Attachments: Capstone Final.docx
Authors: Jeffrey Weis, Niklas Van Den Woldenberg

Pair and Compare Capstone

Thu, 04/28/2016 - 13:15
Abstract: Pair and Compare is a business concept that came from the culmination of a four year degree in Food Service and Beverage Management at Paul Smiths College. This capstone is broken into two parts. The first is a wine/tea tasting and food pairing prototype event that showcased possible pairings to collect data. The second part is to use the data and research to determine if a viable and profitable business similar to this event can be realized
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2016
Authors: Nicholas Komninos

Outward Bound semester: Skills to last a life time

Wed, 12/14/2016 - 10:44
Abstract: The focus of this study will examine the level at which an Outward Bound semester fosters personal growth, connection with nature, and hard skills. This particular Outward Bound semester course traveled from the Florida Keys then on to Costa Rica and Panama in Central America. The course focused on the water elements of sailing, surfing, whitewater rafting, scuba diving, and sea kayaking. Methods used include personal journal reflections, peer and instructors oral and written responses. The researcher was an active participant in the immersive experience and kept a journal of the entire experience trying to gather as much information about the course itself and reflecting on the research process throughout. This research indicated that this experience developed personal character and a connection with nature. These skills have an impact deeper than an isolated course with Outward Bound but can be transferred to daily life.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism, Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management, Parks, Recreation and Facilities Management
Year: 2016
Authors: Sam Annable