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Capstone Projects

Growth of Black Spruce and Tamarack in Response to Abiotic Variables

Tue, 05/03/2016 - 12:46
Abstract: The growth of black spruce (Picea mariana) and tamarack (Larix laricina) was examined in relation to the potential influences of pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, water temperature, proportion of canopy closure and depth to ground water in a northern Adirondack peatland ecosystem. 42 plots were constructed in a sphagnum dominated wetland and sampled for the above abiotic variables throughout the summer and fall of 2015. Heights, ages and periodic annual increment of 26 tamarack and 23 black spruce samples were determined in February and March of 2016. An age to height ratio and periodic annual increment for each species was then regressed against the above abiotic variable data in order to determine any influence of these data on growth rates of the conspecifics. Results show that depth to water table and increased exposure to light had a significantly positive relationship with the age to height ratio of tamarack. Periodic annual increment of tamarack had a significant positive relationship with decreasing light exposure. Black spruce’s age to height ratio had a significant positive relationship with dissolved oxygen (mg/L).
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Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2016
Authors: Robert DeSotle

A Comparison Study of Adirondack Region Clearcutting Implementation to that of Paul Smith’s College VIC FERDA Plots

Mon, 05/02/2016 - 10:44
Abstract: The students of Paul Smith’s College have a unique opportunity to explore the parameters of silviculture and forestry practices. Gaining the base knowledge of silvicultural systems while also, properly implementing timber harvesting methods in order to achieve the specific goals and objectives of these systems is tremendously useful for implementation in future years. This study investigated the silvicultural prescriptions of the Forest Ecosystem Research and Demonstration Area (FERDA) plots on Paul Smith’s College lands, in Paul Smiths, New York. Comparing the inventory of the two clearcut sites upon these lands to that of other harvests within the Adirondack Park can supply further knowledge on what can be expected after a specific silvicultural system. Clearcutting has the greatest effect on forest succession by removing the forest cover and allowing light to reach what was once a shaded forest floor. Comparing experimental five acre clearcuts to that of larger commercial clearcuts in the same region can further our understanding of regeneration composition after such timber harvesting operations occur. The variance between the age of the FERDA plot harvests and the age of the harvests completed on Landvest timberlands resulted in varying data. However, if four to eight more years was given for pseudo FERDA plots to mature, it is believed that these harvests would be similar in composition and structure.
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Literary Rights: On
Major: Forestry
Year: 2016
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Ryan Krzys, Louis Ferrone III

Mycoremediation Potential of Pleurotus ostreatus in Logging Operations

Mon, 05/02/2016 - 10:43
Abstract: The unintentional spillage of diesel and hydraulic fluid is an unfortunate part of forestry operations and the traditional cleanup methods can be costly. Many studies have shown that white rot fungi (WRF) are capable of breaking down a wide variety of environmental pollutants, including diesel fuel. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of a WRF, Pluerotus ostreatus, to breakdown hydraulic fluid. Soil and sawdust were mixed at a 1:1 ratio and jars had, 0%, 3%, 5% and 10% of their volume added in hydraulic fluid. All jars were fully colonized within two weeks and after 30 days the concentration of residual hydrocarbon was analyzed with an extraction. The results showed that the maximum degradation of hydraulic fluid occurred at 5%. In addition sawdust spawn was dehydrated at different temperatures, in order to assess possible field application. The only dehydration test that grew was the air dried sample.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2016
Authors: Peter Murphy, Kirklyn Denis

Silvicultural Analysis of Northern Hardwood Regeneration at the Paul Smith’s College FERDA Plots

Mon, 05/02/2016 - 10:20
Abstract: In the northeastern forests most regeneration comes from natural regeneration that occurs after a disturbance. The Forest Ecosystem Research Demonstration Area (FERDA) plots located on the Paul Smith’s College VIC in the Adirondack Park are set up as an experiment to test different harvest methods in northern hardwood forests and see the results of each. We analyzed tree and sapling size class inventory data from clearcut, single-tree selection, and control treatments to compare regeneration present 14 years after the first harvests occurred. The clearcut treatments were the only treatments analyzed where American beech (Fagus grandifolia) was not the most abundant tree regeneration present. Both single-tree selection and control treatments were dominated by American beech with few other species present. Our results suggest that creating larger canopy openings, may allow species other than American beech, such as red maple (Acer rubrum) and yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis) to become the most abundant species present.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Forestry
Year: 2016
File Attachments: Capstone.pdf
Authors: Zachary McLellan, Justin Saville

An examination of sustainable agricultural practices of small scale dairy farms in the Adirondack North Country of Upstate New York

Mon, 05/01/2017 - 09:14
Abstract: This study examines the sustainable practices of small scale dairy farms in the Adirondack North Country of Upstate New York. The results of this study can assist farmers in developing and implementing sustainable agriculture practices specific for small scale dairy farms in the North Country. Methods for research include farm tours as well as in person interviews with the farmers which will provide an understanding of what farming practices are currently being implemented as well as identifying what potential practices may be implemented. The information that is gathered can also be helpful with legislative processes. It may provide law makers and various agencies with valuable information that can help create guidelines and regulations that support sustainable farming methods as well as assist farmers in understanding their challenges and successes in reaching both economic and environmental sustainability
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2016
Authors: Steven Vincent

Effects of Snow on GPS Accuracy in Forest Environments

Wed, 04/18/2012 - 15:54
Abstract: Abstract Global Positioning Systems, or GPS, have become an indispensable aspect of modern life, used in everyday situations and is a vital component of many occupations, including forestry and natural resources. With increased GPS accuracy, a forester is able to better locate boundaries and geographic or cultural features beneath forest canopy, leading to increased productivity. In the terms of forestry practices, decreased accuracy can cause errors which could lead to financial or physical loss of resources. The goal of this study is to determine the effects of canopy snow on the accuracy of commercially available, recreation grade GPS units which are suitable for forestry use. The effect of snow on canopy closure was tested through the photographic examination of pre and post snow canopy conditions. GPS accuracy was determined by taking averaged GPS measurements alongside the photo measurements. These were points were compared to previously established coordinates derived from a survey traverse. The results showed that snow did affect the canopy closure of the test forest, yet any correlation between GPS accuracy and increased canopy closure was found to be inconclusive.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Forestry
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Snyder2012.pdf
Authors: Rand J. Snyder

Gauging Public Perception towards Visitor Impact as well as a Hypothetical Recreation Permit for the Adirondack State Park, New York

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 20:19
Abstract: Human impact upon natural resources can have negative environmental and social impacts. A questionnaire was given out at Marcy Dam to determine whether or not the public perceived negative impacts from visitor use, in particular mountain recreation areas. Participants were also questioned about a hypothetical permit which could introduce a new form of management within impacted areas. Surveys were then analyzed to see how the public had responded to heavily impacted areas and the idea of a recreation permit. Results were displayed in pie chart form to represent public perceptions and views. From the surveyed participants, it was discovered that the majority of people (85%), saw negative impacts in popular recreation areas. The majority of participants (64%), also expressed they would not be willing to accept a recreation permit for use in certain areas.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Capstone_Final Draft.docx
Authors: Kyle Leech

Comparison of Skid Trail Soil and Adjacent Undisturbed Forest Soil Physical Properties Over a Chronosequence in Vermont

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 19:04
Abstract: The effects of harvesting on forest soil physical properties are visually noticeable on soils where equipment has operated. The effects of equipment passes on forest soils of the Northeastern United States are not well documented. Results from such investigations are less telling when the resilience of forest soils over time is not measured. In an attempt to provide insight, single equipment pass skid trails at two harvest sites (1991 and 2010) meeting similar criteria were sampled. Bulk density (BD), macroporosity, microporosity, total porosity, and strength of skid trial soils and adjacent undisturbed forest soils were measured at each site. The results showed a P-value of 0.019 between soil bulk density, time since harvest, and disturbance type. The 1991 site has resilient soil, as skid trial soil properties were not significantly different than the undisturbed soil properties 20 years later. At the 2010 site, skid trail soil properties were significantly different than undisturbed soil. The goal is that this study be used in conjunction with previous research to aid Northeastern forest managers in determining how to remove wood over successive treatments. The data suggests that soil physical properties are not permanently altered after single equipment passes at the two study sites.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Project 2nd Draft.docx
Authors: Steve Handfield, Daniel Kelting

The Distribution of Northern Harriers (Circus cyaneus) in Northern New York State in Relation to the Availability of Habitat Types

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 18:55
Abstract: Northern Harriers (Circus cyaneus), a bird of prey species, are widely distributed throughout the United States generally at low densities. Harriers are found in New York State, although they are less common than in the Midwest. As the harrier is a species of concern in some regions, it is important to understand how land cover types can affect the distribution of Northern Harriers over time, within a given area. Specifically, this study investigated whether the distributions of Northern Harriers are dependent upon habitat type, and if the frequency of habitat types significantly affects the abundance of Northern Harriers. The area selected for this study includes the majority of New York State to the North and East of Watertown. This region was selected because data indicates that harrier populations have declined from 1980 to 2005. In addition, this region encompasses mountainous areas as well as lower, relatively flatter land outside of the Adirondacks which represents most of New York State. Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems were utilized to determine land cover types for the region. These land cover types were then combined with New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s Breeding Bird Atlas survey blocks. Dominant cover types for each survey block were determined, and the region as a whole was compared to survey blocks within which harriers were present. This process was completed for the years 1984 and 2005, two years in which the Breeding Bird Atlas data were collected for New York State. By using Remote Sensing and GIS, a clearer understanding of the relationship between cover type frequency and harrier presence was possible. Results indicate that Northern Harriers are significantly selecting habitat from land cover types in a proportion different to that which is available. Land cover in this region has shifted throughout the time covered in this study. In addition, a trend of open habitat being chosen over closed canopy habitat is evident. Understanding harrier selection of land cover types can greatly affect management strategies, practices and funding, as the specie is listed as threatened in New York State. The results of this study support much of the available scientific literature on harriers, which state that harriers require a combination of open canopy habitats, including early successional habitat with low vegetative cover.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2012
Authors: Kelly Hoffman

Analyzing 58 years of New York State stumpage reports for Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum), Red Oak (Quercus rubra) and White Pine (Pinus strobus): A real value price trend analysis

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 18:51
Abstract: The trends in stumpage prices reported for New York State fluctuate over time. Three popular species for saw timber in the state of New York are sugar maple, red oak, and white pine. This report produced trends that demonstrate the comparative value of each species over the reported time (58 years), as well as a net present value in 2011 dollars, providing a price trend after inflation was removed. Surrounding states, Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont, have similar reports which are utilized by forest economists to assess investments. As of this point, New York does not have a stumpage trend analysis to compare forest value and productivity. This project examined the stumpage trends for each species and offers possible correlation between points in the trends and specific events. The trends are projected as dollar values over time. Market trend correlation examines the demand for saw timber between hardwood and softwood, with the addition of red oak as another popular saw timber species, and as a color preference factor. The effect of political constraints, in the form of forest preservation, was analyzed with respect to the overall impact on wood flow. Timelines for insect/disease outbreaks were correlated to the highlights of the stumpage trends.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Final Capstone.docx
Authors: Zachary D. Lyon