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Capstone Projects

The influence of a common parent on sap sweetness among open pollinated sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) offspring

Wed, 05/08/2019 - 15:08
Abstract: Beginning in the 1950s, the United States Forest Service began to look into the ability to predict and control the heritability of sap sweetness in sugar maples (Acer saccharum Marsh.). A search for genetically superior (sweeter) trees was conducted across 6 states, testing 21,000 trees. Only 53 trees were chosen to be parental stock for the “Super Sweet” sugar maple improvement program. These trees, cloned through rooted cuttings and scion wood grafting, were planted in the Grand Isle, VT clonal bank. One of the five progeny tests of open pollinated offspring from the clonal bank was established in Lake Placid, New York. These trees had their first evaluation at age ten. Each tree had its diameter and height measured, as well as its sap sweetness tested. Now, 35 years after planting, the trees were evaluated again. An inventory was conducted with diameter at breast height, tree height, and live crown ratio measurements. Of the 725 trees planted, only 396 trees remain. Only 258 trees were of size and quality to handle a 5/16” tap. Their sap sweetness was measured at multiple times though out the season. Knowing one of the two parents of each tree allowed for the comparison of the sap sweetness of the different common-parent groups. The data collected did not support that the knowledge of only one parent could be used to predicts a tree’s sweetness relative to any other parent’s offspring. The bigger picture progeny evaluations will continue the “Super Sweet” sugar maple improvement program.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2019
Authors: Eric Mance

Alumni Campground and the relationship with seasonal guests and wildlife

Tue, 12/17/2019 - 00:45
Abstract: For our capstone, we plan to focus on the wildlife and human interaction dynamics within Paul Smith’s College Alumni Campground. The objective of Owen’s section for capstone is too develop a ‘bear-awareness’ program for the Alumni Campground. Katie is looking into establishing a wildlife management plan of the campground correlating with the evidence of determining where there are patterns of travel within the campground of the local wildlife.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2019
File Attachments: Capstone Paper_3.docx
Authors: Owen Murray , Katie Reily

Planning and Future Management of the Adirondack Land Trust Glenview Preserve

Sat, 05/11/2019 - 08:51
Abstract: The Adirondack Land Trust purchased a 238 acre parcel of land, Glenview Preserve, from the Trevor family in 2016. The Glenview Preserve is located along New York State Route 86 in Harrietstown. The Glenview Preserve already consists of a heavily visited scenic vista of Whiteface Mountain, the McKenzie Range, and other Adirondack High Peaks. The property borders the Bloomingdale Bog, the third largest boreal peatland in New York State. The Glenview Preserve can be a perfect spot to incorporate a trail system to allow visitors the opportunity for non-consumptive recreational activities. When creating a trail system for recreation it is important to examine the impacts on local flora and fauna. A clearly designated trail system is the number one way to mitigate impacts on soil, vegetation, wildlife, and water created by visitors. Within the preserve interpretive signs will be implemented to educate and inform visitors on proper usage of the trail system. The unique thing with the area is the gradual grade of only 50 feet so the breathtaking views are virtually accessible to everyone who visits. Recreational activities allow people to get outside and enjoy nature and hopefully build personal environmental stewardship. The trail system will not only allow recreational opportunities for visitors but establish a sense of an outdoor community.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2019
File Attachments: Capstone_Murray 2019.docx
Authors: Payton Murray

Proposal for Improvements to Alumni Campground Waterfront

Sat, 12/14/2019 - 15:42
Abstract: The Alumni Campground is full of potential. A front country campground in close proximity to many great wilderness experiences. Some of those experiences can be best reached by water and yet the Alumni Campground waterfront is not much more than a single “No Swimming” sign nailed to a tree. This lack of infrastructure has caused degradation of the shoreline as the user base for water craft does use the campground as a starting point for excursions onto the St. Regis waterways but due to a lack of durable launching sites they have created several eroded and denuded spots along the lakes bank. In order to accommodate the amount of use this asset receives and prevent further degradation this proposal is designed to give the Alumni Campground Committee a sensible set of options for structural improvements designed to suit the user bases needs and protect the valuable waterfront resources.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Parks and Conservation Management
Year: 2019
Authors: Tobias Calzarette

Forest Structure and Composition in the Smitty Creek Watershed

Wed, 12/14/2016 - 09:56
Abstract: The 2016 Smitty Creek CFI (Continuous Forest Inventory) study addressed the issue of creating a reliable and repeatable inventory design to examine general forestry trends and their relationships with the watershed itself. Identifying these trends and their consequences is important when considering factors linked to climate change, such as carbon storage and allocation. The objective of this project were as follows: establish 10 new CFI plots, monitor and record for signs of disease and insects, tree mortality, and overstory wildlife habitat, accurately estimate forest carbon sequestration, record understory composition in a 1/50th acre area around each plot center, and suggest methods and reasons for application in Paul Smith’s College CFI capstone projects. The study was conducted within the Smitty Creek watershed in Paul Smiths, NY with the plots falling on a transect that runs north and south. At each plot, trees within the radius were assigned numbered aluminum tags, trees were measured at diameter at breast height, and other features, such as snags, were recorded. Upon completing the project, 10 CFI plots had been created and their locations were recorded, several diseases and forest health concerns were identified, as well as, tree mortality and wildlife habitat considerations, carbon sequestration for the watershed was modeled over the next century, and a CFI project was designed for the Paul Smith’s College land compartments. The Smitty Creek watershed CFI project is repeatable and has an accurate baseline of information for future studies, and the Paul Smith’s College land compartments CFI plot design is ready for implementation.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry
Year: 2016
Authors: Gregg Slezak, Leonard Johnson, William O'Reilly, Jake Weber, Charlie Ulrich, Collin Perkins McCraw, Jake Harm, Nick Georgelas

Pair and Compare Capstone

Thu, 04/28/2016 - 13:15
Abstract: Pair and Compare is a business concept that came from the culmination of a four year degree in Food Service and Beverage Management at Paul Smiths College. This capstone is broken into two parts. The first is a wine/tea tasting and food pairing prototype event that showcased possible pairings to collect data. The second part is to use the data and research to determine if a viable and profitable business similar to this event can be realized
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2016
Authors: Nicholas Komninos

Jenkins Café

Wed, 04/27/2016 - 07:25
Abstract: Jenkins’ Café will be a quick service café establishment located at the base of Jenkins Mountain, along the trail systems of the Visitor’s Interpretive Center (VIC). The VIC has recently become an entity of Paul Smith’s College, allowing greater flexibility of management, away from State jurisdiction. About three miles into the VIC’s trail system is the base of Jenkins’ Mountain, the location for Jenkins’ Café. Jenkins’ Café will serve local residents, Paul Smith’s College students, and VIC visitors’ quick meals consisting of sandwiches, soups, and salads while they utilize the VIC trails. Warm and cold beverages will also be available for service, including a small selection of beer and wine. Hikers, cross-country skiers, bird watchers, snowmobilers, and anyone participating in any VIC activities, can enjoy these fares when they arrive at Jenkins’ Café.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2016
File Attachments: Capstone Final.docx
Authors: Jeffrey Weis, Niklas Van Den Woldenberg

Flight of 5 Food Truck Company

Tue, 04/26/2016 - 10:16
Abstract: The Flight of Five Food Truck Company is run by Catherine Bergman and her colleague Malik Pryce. They are both hard working and determined business workers. Catherine Bergman has her degree in Food Service and Beverage Management and Culinary Arts and Malik Pryce has worked in many restaurants where he has been on his way into a management position and has been working with Catherine since 2015. The Flight of Five Food Truck Company is located and run in Lockport New York. Where weIt has a plan on selling items named after local colleges’ and universities’ names and mascots. The Flight of Five Food Truck Company is named after the 5 five locks on the Erie Canal, we and this company wanted to have a historical tie in to our business and the town.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2016
File Attachments: Flight of FIve final.docx
Authors: Catherine Bergman

Growth of Black Spruce and Tamarack in Response to Abiotic Variables

Tue, 05/03/2016 - 12:46
Abstract: The growth of black spruce (Picea mariana) and tamarack (Larix laricina) was examined in relation to the potential influences of pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, water temperature, proportion of canopy closure and depth to ground water in a northern Adirondack peatland ecosystem. 42 plots were constructed in a sphagnum dominated wetland and sampled for the above abiotic variables throughout the summer and fall of 2015. Heights, ages and periodic annual increment of 26 tamarack and 23 black spruce samples were determined in February and March of 2016. An age to height ratio and periodic annual increment for each species was then regressed against the above abiotic variable data in order to determine any influence of these data on growth rates of the conspecifics. Results show that depth to water table and increased exposure to light had a significantly positive relationship with the age to height ratio of tamarack. Periodic annual increment of tamarack had a significant positive relationship with decreasing light exposure. Black spruce’s age to height ratio had a significant positive relationship with dissolved oxygen (mg/L).
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2016
Authors: Robert DeSotle

A Comparison Study of Adirondack Region Clearcutting Implementation to that of Paul Smith’s College VIC FERDA Plots

Mon, 05/02/2016 - 10:44
Abstract: The students of Paul Smith’s College have a unique opportunity to explore the parameters of silviculture and forestry practices. Gaining the base knowledge of silvicultural systems while also, properly implementing timber harvesting methods in order to achieve the specific goals and objectives of these systems is tremendously useful for implementation in future years. This study investigated the silvicultural prescriptions of the Forest Ecosystem Research and Demonstration Area (FERDA) plots on Paul Smith’s College lands, in Paul Smiths, New York. Comparing the inventory of the two clearcut sites upon these lands to that of other harvests within the Adirondack Park can supply further knowledge on what can be expected after a specific silvicultural system. Clearcutting has the greatest effect on forest succession by removing the forest cover and allowing light to reach what was once a shaded forest floor. Comparing experimental five acre clearcuts to that of larger commercial clearcuts in the same region can further our understanding of regeneration composition after such timber harvesting operations occur. The variance between the age of the FERDA plot harvests and the age of the harvests completed on Landvest timberlands resulted in varying data. However, if four to eight more years was given for pseudo FERDA plots to mature, it is believed that these harvests would be similar in composition and structure.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Forestry
Year: 2016
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Ryan Krzys, Louis Ferrone III