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Capstone Projects

Food Allergies, Dietary Restrictions, and the Foodservice Industry

Thu, 12/03/2015 - 22:59
Abstract: For modern culinary professionals, food allergies and restricted diets present one of the biggest challenges in daily work. Ranging from an anaphylaxis-triggering peanut allergy to a preference for avoiding meat on Fridays, dietary restrictions and food sensitivities cover a wide variety of potential hurdles, and potentially inspirational guidelines, which foodservice professionals must navigate in order to be successful. On one side, a rise in the number of those with allergies or dietary restrictions presents an added challenge, but on the other, it presents an opportunity. Diners with such restrictions are becoming more and more comfortable with going out to dinner; that there will be some accommodation is now expected by consumers, rather than hoped for. The definition of “food allergy,” according to the Mayo Clinic, is “an immune system reaction that occurs soon after eating a certain food.” However, according to many experienced foodservice workers, the definition is “an annoying request from a customer who’s probably lying, anyway.” Of the many challenges contemporary chefs, culinarians, and food service professionals face, food preparation and service for those with allergies and restricted diets is one of the most prevalent, as well as one of the most misunderstood. Foodservice professionals will tell you that some of the most [annoying, silly, overblown, difficult, frightening] requests they receive while working are for special adjustments to accommodate a food allergy. When a chef is asked if the signature pasta dish can be made without gluten, his reaction is too often a mix of ire, disgust, and even embarrassment. Should a patron make a simple request that his or her food be prepared away from peanuts, images of anaphylactic shock and ambulances in the parking lot dance demonically through the front-of-house manager’s head. Such requests, however, seem to be popping up more and more often in our world. According to the CDC, “The prevalence of food allergies among children increased 18% during 1997-2007.” About 15 million Americans suffer from food allergies, as well as about 18 million Europeans. With such a rapid increase in those numbers, one would think the opportunity to impress customers with special diets might make a chef happy, rather than feeling as though he has been offended. The patience of chefs grows thinner still, however, when such requests are not a matter of health, but a matter of preference. For those who, for various reasons, adhere to a vegetarian or plant-based diet, or who follow certain religious dietary restrictions such as Islamic Halaal, finding a restaurant where the staff is ready and willing to accommodate can sometimes be difficult. For contemporary food handlers, ethics and morality play a massive role in serving such customers. A vegetarian diner, for example, may not know that the house minestrone soup is made with chicken stock in place of vegetable stock. Even after eating the soup, that customer will likely never know. In such situations, the decision to serve certain foods comes down to how much respect for his or her customers a chef has. It is my belief that the largest contributing factor towards the negative feelings chefs harbor over dietary restrictions is a lack of education and experience in handling such requests. Things unknown have always been a source of anxiety for a majority of human kind. That anxiety is why we are explorers and innovators; we subconsciously want to make things known. In order for foodservice professionals to handle the large number of diners who now request special items, it is necessary that they be educated from the earliest stages of their careers to expect, to accept, to interpret, and to enjoy working with those types of challenges. By doing so, the food and beverage industry will be a much more friendly world for all consumers, and a much more profitable one for all industry professionals.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Nathaniel Swain

Cheese

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 17:05
Abstract: This culminating experience happens in two phases. Throughout the semester, students have been taking on the role of Executive Chef in our Palm Restaurant. They have each created a menu, ordered food supplies, developed budgetary proposal, and assigned duties pertaining to food production and front of house service. Each dinner took on a different food related theme that the students researched and developed. This poster session provides the students to describe their process, their findings, and what they learned from the experience. My theme was based on cheese.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Lisa McCartney

Potato

Thu, 05/07/2015 - 09:17
Abstract: This Casptone includes exhilarating information about the multiple species of tubers. It goes in depth about the multiple uses of the potato and all of the nutrition of each species.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Potato
Authors: Nicole Landry

A Taste Of Legumes

Sat, 05/09/2015 - 20:00
Abstract: This capstone investigates the history and use of legumes over the years. Contained within you will find information about the agricultural and culinary importance of these plants.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: KIC%20Document%200001-5.pdf
Authors: Elizabeth Savoie
Sat, 05/09/2015 - 20:00
Abstract: This capstone investigates the history and use of legumes over the years. Contained within you will find information about the agricultural and culinary importance of these plants.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: KIC%20Document%200001-5.pdf
Authors: Elizabeth Savoie

Building Families Stronger

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 14:05
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to design a program that can be implemented in local camps to accommodate the needs of individuals in a family group affected by mental illness. The study will explain the importance of educating individuals about mental illness and integrating supportive behaviors. This program is designed to help families cope with the effects mental illness can have on the entire family dynamic. Families are often the strongest support system for dealing with mental illness and educating families is essential for success of the mentally ill. Team building games are used to enhance social behaviors and encourage group bonding, this program uses a recreational therapeutic approach to addressing issues in the lives of those affected by mental illness. To figure out how many people will be most likely be using the therapy program, a survey was created using a series of questions that went with the topic for respondents to answer. In fact the survey established that the majority of people agree on recreational approach to therapy as a means of coping with their illness in real life tasks. Other questions asked was what their favorite activities where, such as paddle sports and hiking. Another question was what disability was so as to get an idea what accommodations would be need and services for patients involved with the program.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Natural Resources Environmental Science, Parks, Recreation and Facilities Management
Year: 2015
Authors: Courtney Berg, Douglas Menge, Ashley Beldock

Can Restauranteurs Successfully Influence Guest Behavior By Using Facebook?

Sun, 12/02/2012 - 20:55
Abstract: Facebook is a form of social media used by millions on a daily basis. Restauranteurs’ ability to use Facebook to influence guest behavior, build a connection, and receive comments could potentially benefit their restaurants. This study was conducted on Facebook, sending surveys to my “friends,” discovering how restaurants’ Facebook pages are affecting them. Seeing how my study was based on Facebook it was appropriate to only conduct the surveys on this form of social media. The goal was to find if restauranteurs could attract more customers to their restaurant by influencing guest behavior on Facebook. This will prove if using Facebook is a worthwhile marketing tool. People interested in this topic will become more knowledgeable about this form of social media from a business perspective and the Facebook company could benefit from this study as well. This study will give recommendations to restauranteurs on how to make their restaurant “stand out” on Facebook.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Joshua Werksman

Do Adirondack Farmers Perceive Aquaponics as a Solution to the Lack of Year Round Out of Season Local Food?

Sun, 12/02/2012 - 23:59
Abstract: Several different factors contribute to the farmers of the Adirondacks inability to produce sustainable, fresh, local food out of season. This study will provide a comprehensive literature-review-based overview of modern day farming, aquaponics, local food sheds, and the farmers associated with Adirondack Harvest and Green Circle. This capstone seeks to determine via surveys if aquaponics is a solution to the challenges Adirondack farmers face today in their lack of year round productivity. The consensus of this capstone will determine if aquaponics is a solution to the challenges Adirondack farmer’s face regarding the lack of local out of season food for the residents of the Adirondack region.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Aquaponics Capstone
Authors: Ashley Rokjer

Tasty Tunes

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 14:16
Abstract: The senses of hearing and tasting are being paired together more and more as the subject becomes more popular, bringing musicians and chefs closer together. This study will determine the optimal music to play in a particular restaurant and show how well that music stimulates a customer’s palate. A farm-to-table restaurant will be the place of research where music that complements the food will be played on four different nights and customer surveys will measure the differences in taste and customer enjoyment between four different music genres. The data will be used to prove that the optimal music really does make food and the time spent more enjoyable. The results may lead to be very beneficial to dining room managers, restaurant owners, chefs, and musicians who perform in the hospitality industry in their efforts in matching food and dining with music.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Kelsey Jones

From Garden to School: Future Trend Prediction study of school lunches and the edible schoolyard, Kitchen Garden Project, and Let’s Move! Programs.

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 16:59
Abstract: The ‘Edible Schoolyard’ movement is driving schools towards offering freshly grown produce into their school lunch programs. The Edible Schoolyard aims to provide fresh produce with learning experiences in order to encourage school children to eat healthy and make good decisions about what they eat. An edible schoolyard can be utilized as a major development for school systems, especially in the United States where the growing rates of obesity in our children is still increasing. The purpose of this study was to explore the plausibility of a school system adapting the edible schoolyard or even similar program such as: Kitchen Garden Project and Let’s Move!. A survey was used to measure and compare the responses on if the edible schoolyard is possible for a school system to incorporate. The outcome of this survey can be used to persuade schools into deciding whether they think it’s a good idea to adapt the program into their school system, or even deciding if it’s worth implementing some aspects of the edible schoolyard for their schools.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Final23.docx
Authors: Barbara Sanchez