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Capstone Projects

Food Allergies, Dietary Restrictions, and the Foodservice Industry

Thu, 12/03/2015 - 22:59
Abstract: For modern culinary professionals, food allergies and restricted diets present one of the biggest challenges in daily work. Ranging from an anaphylaxis-triggering peanut allergy to a preference for avoiding meat on Fridays, dietary restrictions and food sensitivities cover a wide variety of potential hurdles, and potentially inspirational guidelines, which foodservice professionals must navigate in order to be successful. On one side, a rise in the number of those with allergies or dietary restrictions presents an added challenge, but on the other, it presents an opportunity. Diners with such restrictions are becoming more and more comfortable with going out to dinner; that there will be some accommodation is now expected by consumers, rather than hoped for. The definition of “food allergy,” according to the Mayo Clinic, is “an immune system reaction that occurs soon after eating a certain food.” However, according to many experienced foodservice workers, the definition is “an annoying request from a customer who’s probably lying, anyway.” Of the many challenges contemporary chefs, culinarians, and food service professionals face, food preparation and service for those with allergies and restricted diets is one of the most prevalent, as well as one of the most misunderstood. Foodservice professionals will tell you that some of the most [annoying, silly, overblown, difficult, frightening] requests they receive while working are for special adjustments to accommodate a food allergy. When a chef is asked if the signature pasta dish can be made without gluten, his reaction is too often a mix of ire, disgust, and even embarrassment. Should a patron make a simple request that his or her food be prepared away from peanuts, images of anaphylactic shock and ambulances in the parking lot dance demonically through the front-of-house manager’s head. Such requests, however, seem to be popping up more and more often in our world. According to the CDC, “The prevalence of food allergies among children increased 18% during 1997-2007.” About 15 million Americans suffer from food allergies, as well as about 18 million Europeans. With such a rapid increase in those numbers, one would think the opportunity to impress customers with special diets might make a chef happy, rather than feeling as though he has been offended. The patience of chefs grows thinner still, however, when such requests are not a matter of health, but a matter of preference. For those who, for various reasons, adhere to a vegetarian or plant-based diet, or who follow certain religious dietary restrictions such as Islamic Halaal, finding a restaurant where the staff is ready and willing to accommodate can sometimes be difficult. For contemporary food handlers, ethics and morality play a massive role in serving such customers. A vegetarian diner, for example, may not know that the house minestrone soup is made with chicken stock in place of vegetable stock. Even after eating the soup, that customer will likely never know. In such situations, the decision to serve certain foods comes down to how much respect for his or her customers a chef has. It is my belief that the largest contributing factor towards the negative feelings chefs harbor over dietary restrictions is a lack of education and experience in handling such requests. Things unknown have always been a source of anxiety for a majority of human kind. That anxiety is why we are explorers and innovators; we subconsciously want to make things known. In order for foodservice professionals to handle the large number of diners who now request special items, it is necessary that they be educated from the earliest stages of their careers to expect, to accept, to interpret, and to enjoy working with those types of challenges. By doing so, the food and beverage industry will be a much more friendly world for all consumers, and a much more profitable one for all industry professionals.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Nathaniel Swain

Cheese

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 17:05
Abstract: This culminating experience happens in two phases. Throughout the semester, students have been taking on the role of Executive Chef in our Palm Restaurant. They have each created a menu, ordered food supplies, developed budgetary proposal, and assigned duties pertaining to food production and front of house service. Each dinner took on a different food related theme that the students researched and developed. This poster session provides the students to describe their process, their findings, and what they learned from the experience. My theme was based on cheese.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Lisa McCartney

Potato

Thu, 05/07/2015 - 09:17
Abstract: This Casptone includes exhilarating information about the multiple species of tubers. It goes in depth about the multiple uses of the potato and all of the nutrition of each species.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Potato
Authors: Nicole Landry

A Taste Of Legumes

Sat, 05/09/2015 - 20:00
Abstract: This capstone investigates the history and use of legumes over the years. Contained within you will find information about the agricultural and culinary importance of these plants.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: KIC%20Document%200001-5.pdf
Authors: Elizabeth Savoie
Sat, 05/09/2015 - 20:00
Abstract: This capstone investigates the history and use of legumes over the years. Contained within you will find information about the agricultural and culinary importance of these plants.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: KIC%20Document%200001-5.pdf
Authors: Elizabeth Savoie

HOS 462 Hospitality Business Simulation-OceanView

Sun, 05/03/2015 - 12:20
Abstract: This capstone was a business simulation where student managed and operated an online hotel and restaurant. OceanView was managed and operated by Kadie Ouellette, Ashlee Doele and Veronika Vanisheuskaya. OceanView is located on the beautiful shores of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The reports in this file are the first year business plan, yearly analyses and final business plan.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: HOS 462 OceanView.docx
Authors: Kadie Ouellette, Ashlee Doele, Veronika Vanisheuskaya

Spring 2015 HOS 462- Final Capstone Submission

Mon, 05/04/2015 - 10:54
Abstract: Capstone Project: Our Capstone Simulation Course entailed running a Hotel Property out of Cape Cod Massachusetts. We had to make decisions as a group in order to execute and track the results of how our property was performing on a monthly basis. Our Business Model was targeted more towards business travelers. The following is our Analysis of how our property performed each Year throughout the Semester.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Capstone-Final Submission
Authors: Rebecca Forman, Victor Dickson, Wyatt Gressler

HOS 462 Hospitality Business Simulation

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:57
Abstract: We as students in this course have been systematically redeveloping and managing a large multi-departmental hotel. This computer-simulated activity has given us the opportunity to achieve success through creative analysis to solve economic, social and environmental problems. The consequences of these decisions are reported and subsequently analyzed over a 3 year cycle of business. During our Capstone Celebration we have presented our results in a poster session and then provide a summative boardroom discussion of those internal and external forces and decisions that most powerfully affected our group’s successes, failures and adoption of change. This Paul Smith's College capstone experience has also allowed us to finalize our Paul Smith's education by giving us the opportunity to demonstrate mastery of the general education core and programmatic learning objectives. We have also had the chance to apply skills, methodologies and knowledge learned during our courses of study, building on this undergraduate learning experience as we evaluate our readiness for the next stage in our professional development.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2015
Authors: Nicolas Gonzalez, Lydia Kieffer, Luis Escala

Pearl Shore Hotel Capstone

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 14:39
Abstract: HOTS business simulation includes business analyses, marketing plans, editorial calendars, and RFP's.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2015
Authors: Emily Brosseau, Greer Gibian, Matthew Sullivan

HOS 462 Hospitality Business Simulation - Blue Diamond

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 16:25
Abstract: Over the course of the semester, our capstone class took on the role of General Manager of a hotel through a business simulation. Each month, decisions were made based off on financial reports and key performance indicators. This report is the result of the decisions made from Year 1 to Year 3. They include business plans, business analyses, editorial calender, and RFP documents.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2015
Authors: Amanda Middleton, Katrina Furuta, Matthew Bailey