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Capstone Projects

Feasibility Study of an Outdoor Classroom Area in Glenview Preserve

Fri, 12/14/2018 - 21:36
Abstract: The Glenview Property is 238 acres with a lot of potential. One of those potentials could be to create a sustainable education area for the public. The Glenview Preserve is known for its scenic view of the mountains, its lowland boreal forest, and its productive farmland. The Adirondacks are known for its forestry, agriculture, and open space recreation. The Adirondack Land Trust owns and manages this area. The ideal main uses of this property are agricultural, educational, sustainable outreach programs, and a balance between natural and artificial scenery (Adirondack Land Trust, 2017). Within the Adirondacks, where the beauty is breathtaking, recreation is at world-class level, and the land is environmentally protected, experiences are held in order to promote environmental awareness. With local resources and the natural growing land space, a sustainable education area can be built. Additional projects within the area includes an amphitheater, a kiln, and raised garden spaces.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2018
File Attachments: CapFinal.docx
Authors: Quinn Jordan

Engaging Visitors Of Glenview Preserve With Interpretive Signage

Fri, 12/14/2018 - 11:42
Abstract: Glenview Preserve is a Lowland forest and Field property that boarders the Bloomingdale Bog. Implementing an educational system at the preserve would lead to more public interaction that would guarantee support for the Adirondack Land Trust’s mission objectives. This approach would involve the development of an interpretive day-use site, interpretive programs and signs, and an outdoor education space. For my portion I will be investigating how the Adirondack Land Trust can construct interpretive signage that is weather resistant and provides valuable content. The quality of the content will be evaluated using the National Association of Interpretation principles of POETRY. These signs will promote ALT’s mission objectives by encouraging people to make a difference after their visit through well-constructed and entertaining information. Visitors will donate money to ensure that having an educational system at the preserve is a leading concern of the Adirondack Land Trust’s management plan for Glenview Preserve.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Integrative Studies, Natural Resources Conservation and Management, Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management, Parks and Conservation Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Tiffany Elizabeth Marie Clark

Student of Natural Resources and Conservation Management

Fall 2018 graduate of Paul Smith's College

"Pickling in Dessert Products"

Mon, 05/07/2018 - 11:38
Abstract: History of pickling and the different methods that can be used. The Pickling of fruits and vegetables in dessert products.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2018
Authors: Kayla King

Chocolate

Fri, 05/04/2018 - 15:03
Abstract: Chocolate is found everywhere but not usually thought about in savory dishes. Most people also do not think about what chocolate goes through to become a finished product. In my dinner, I showed how chocolate can be used in a four-course meal. My paper then goes through how cocoa is grown, the process, fair trade chocolate, health benefits, history, cocoa uses, and different kinds of chocolate.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2018
Authors: Amber Noecker

The Application of Silvicultural Treatments to Establish and Maintain Early Successional Habitat in the Adirondack Forests of New York State

Sat, 04/29/2017 - 15:12
Abstract: Early successional habitat (ESH) in New York state can be described as young forests comprising trees, shrubs, grasses, and other herbaceous plants that form relatively open canopies with dense understories. ESH has decreased due to nearly ninety percent of the naturally occurring shrublands of North America having been destroyed. The destruction of this habitat is of top concern due to the threatened and endangered species whom rely on these sorts of habitats to thrive. Considering the future climate projections, population models, and theoretical species distribution, responsible stewardship is needed to manage in favor of ESH types. A meta-analysis of various journals and databases was performed to synthesize information into a general management plan for establishing ESH in the Adirondacks. Through combining methods and silvicultural management practices from past plans in the northeastern United States, as well as background knowledge of the area, this management plan has been tailored specifically for an Adirondack forest. These outlined silvicultural treatments may also be extended to a variety of other forest types in the eastern U.S.A. Re-establishing young forests throughout the region is the goal of this plan. In doing so, these practices will enhance the health, resiliency, and biodiversity of the Adirondack region, and New York State by creating critical ESH which the fauna and flora of this region depend upon.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Integrative Studies, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2017
Authors: Nicole Morin, Ryan Baker, Ora Bice

Building Families Stronger

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 14:05
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to design a program that can be implemented in local camps to accommodate the needs of individuals in a family group affected by mental illness. The study will explain the importance of educating individuals about mental illness and integrating supportive behaviors. This program is designed to help families cope with the effects mental illness can have on the entire family dynamic. Families are often the strongest support system for dealing with mental illness and educating families is essential for success of the mentally ill. Team building games are used to enhance social behaviors and encourage group bonding, this program uses a recreational therapeutic approach to addressing issues in the lives of those affected by mental illness. To figure out how many people will be most likely be using the therapy program, a survey was created using a series of questions that went with the topic for respondents to answer. In fact the survey established that the majority of people agree on recreational approach to therapy as a means of coping with their illness in real life tasks. Other questions asked was what their favorite activities where, such as paddle sports and hiking. Another question was what disability was so as to get an idea what accommodations would be need and services for patients involved with the program.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Natural Resources Environmental Science, Parks, Recreation and Facilities Management
Year: 2015
Authors: Courtney Berg, Douglas Menge, Ashley Beldock

Environmental Factors Influencing the Establishment of Moss Species in the Elevator Shaft on Whiteface Mountain: A Descriptive Study

Wed, 12/02/2015 - 15:19
Abstract: The moss species growing in the elevator shaft on Whiteface Mountain have not yet been identified and little is known on the environmental conditions in which they exist. Light, moisture, substrate pH, and temperature play vital roles in the establishment and reproduction of moss. In the summer of 2015 eight moss species, present only in their gametophyte generation, were identified in the shaft. Four of these species are known to exist on the mountain outside of the elevator shaft. Temperature and relative humidity were measured to represent the conditions of the shaft, whereas available light, moisture, and substrate pH were measured with each colony. Temperature and humidity became more stable further into the shaft, similar to that of a cave environment. In addition, temperature peaked during the hours the elevator was in operation. Light, moisture, and substrate pH of each species were not strongly correlated with colony area. Most colonies were found to be growing on a type of sediment, rather than directly on the granite wall of the shaft. The pH of these substrates ranged between 6.68 and 8.99. The influx of tourists on Whiteface between May and October may play a vital role in the establishment of these species. The elevator may provide air circulation within the shaft and the electric lights omit the radiation necessary for the mosses survival. There is a 6 month period with possibly no light source or circulation of air. Further research should document these changes in environmental conditions during this period.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2015
Authors: Danica R. Maloney

White Pine Blister Rust at Paul Smith’s VIC: Concerns and Recommendations

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 18:34
Abstract: Abstract- Blister rust was reported on the Paul Smith’s VIC property. White pine blister rust is a complex disease pathosystem in which Cronartium ribicola – a rust fungus - infects both eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) and species in the Ribes genus. P. strobus is a disturbance species in the Adirondacks. Ribes spp. are early seral stage plants and readily exploit small gaps in the forest. Both are found on the VIC property. C. ribicola limits white pine regeneration, but isn’t currently considered a serious forest pathogen in the Northeast because its spread is limited by environmental, topographic, climatic, and temporal conditions. Despite these limits, blister rust has moved around the globe and has successfully spread across a wide range in the U.S. Because blister rust exists in a dynamic and interconnected world, there exists the potential for it to increase in virulence and incidence. Historically, management of blister rust has involved removing ribes from the landscape in favor of white pine- a scheme that is too costly and yields little long term benefit for landowners. A gap in the knowledge exists for smaller landowners dealing with blister rust. With this considered, based on a wide body of literature, management plans were designed to fit the VIC’s needs now and in the future.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Riquier capstone.docx
Authors: Adam Riquier

An Examination of the Paul Smith’s Visitor Interpretative Center Trail Conditions and Suggested Sustainable Maintenance Practices

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 10:59
Abstract: The Adirondack Park is a 6.4 million acre state park in Upstate New York. With over 2,000 miles of hike able trails, this region is a popular tourist attraction in the Northeast. Thousands of people visit the Adirondack region to hike each year, which means that the trails within the park are subject to high intensity use. Natural resource management professionals such as the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and the Adirondack Park Agency (APA) are concerned with the quality of trails winding through the region, and also promote awareness of the fragile alpine ecosystems resting atop the 5,000+ ft. tall mountains- which are constantly being degraded by human foot traffic. However, there are smaller and less maintained trails that run through our own backyard here at Paul Smith’s College, at the Visitors Interpretative Center (V.I.C.), with equally as fragile and important ecosystems. These range from bogs to eskers- the home of the rare and interesting Pitcher Plant (Sarracenia purpurea), to wetlands and riverine systems containing native heritage Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), populations such as the Windfall strain. Currently, there is no formal data documenting the condition of trails within the VIC property, therefore one may never know the true condition of the entire trail system. The Paul Smith’s V.I.C. can greatly benefit from applying recommended management techniques in the future using up to date information gathered in the spring of 2015. This report will provide new data, which will help management professionals examine the feasibility of applying accepted current and future sustainable trail management practices to the trails belonging to Paul Smith’s College.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2015
File Attachments: NEWCAPSTONE.docx
Authors: Loretta Buerkle

Acidic Deposition in Adirondack Lakes: Episodic Acidification and Equilibrium

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 10:06
Abstract: Acid deposition has been a historic problem in the Adirondacks. Though after original mitigation attempts were deemed successful, funding for many acid deposition-monitoring programs in the area has been cut or eliminated, and much of the data that has been collected is now old and outdated. Newer data on this issue needed to be collected to determine if there truly has been recovery of Adirondack lakes. Through this observational experiment the pH levels of 18 different lakes scattered around the Adirondacks during winter were examined. The pH levels of the snow around the lakes were examined to determine the levels of acid shock. This data was compared to the historic data available and created a preliminary finding. This comparison helped determine that Adirondack water bodies could possibly be coming to a form of equilibrium as the pH levels are possibly returning to a resemblance of pre-disturbance conditions, which suggests recent legislation may have had measurable successes in the goal of reducing the acidification of Adirondack freshwater ecosystems.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Timothy Johnston, Andrew Olcott