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Capstone Projects

Does the presence of Malus spp. increase the fertility of the soil surface in pastures?

Mon, 05/01/2017 - 18:24
Abstract: Techniques to increase soil fertility in a pasture can benefit the system by combating soil degradation and increasing the health of vegetation. The use of apple trees (Malus spp.) may be particularly beneficial in achieving this due to reliable fruit yields, ease of management, and variety of suitable habitat. We hypothesized that soil directly under the canopy of apple trees would be higher in nutrients (C, Ca, K, Mg, N, & P) than soil in areas with no tree cover. Soil samples were taken from the top 15 cm of the soil surface under apple trees and in areas without trees at 14 sites in Massachusetts and New York. Samples were analyzed using spectrometry and color imagery to determine nutrient content. Potassium and magnesium concentrations were found to be significantly higher in under-canopy samples. Further research may expand these results and determine if the application of apple trees can be used to increase the health of pasture systems.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Forestry
Year: 2017
File Attachments: capstone_gumbartpayson.pdf
Authors: Julia Payson, Ryan Gumbart

Loopy's Diner: A business Plan

Wed, 04/26/2017 - 10:34
Abstract: Loopy's diner is a proposed eatery in the Auburn, NY area. Loopy's diner looks to put a healthy spin on casual fare such as burgers, fries, etc while integrating locally sourced ingredients. 
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2017
File Attachments: Business Plan-Lupien.docx
Authors: Adam Lupien

Creating a Reliable Surveying Network: Does Adding New Survey Control Points to Paul Smith’s College Campus Enhance its Current Network?

Tue, 12/05/2017 - 18:48
Abstract: The goal of the project was to improve the current geometry of the Paul Smith’s College surveying network. Four new survey control points were added to the current network allowing for new connectivity to old control points. Previously, there was a Westside network and an Eastside network that were not connected and by connecting these two networks, it has expanded the current network further into the campus. Two different methods were used to help identify the new network. A traditional survey method, a closed traverse, was used to connect the old control points to the new control points by utilizing a Nikon DTM-352 series total station. A X90 OPUS GPS unit was used to connect the new control points into a geodetic network. After the data was collected a least squares adjustment was done to the closed traverse to correct for error within the traverse. The GPS data was processed by Topcon Tools utilizing a Continuously Operating Reference System (CORS) to obtain a better level of accuracy for the network it produced. The two different techniques used produced different results in the overall survey networks and supplied different coordinates than what has been previously used by students at the college. These results gained from the project are not of a consistent level of precision and are not recommended for use without conducting more closed traverses to increase precision within the network.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy, Surveying Technology
Year: 2017
Authors: Frederick C. Petzoldt, Michael S. Thompson

Creating Universal Use for the Glenview Preserve

Fri, 12/15/2017 - 20:40
Abstract: The Adirondack Land Trust recently purchased 238 acres along Route 86 in Harrietstown. This tract of land is called the Glenview Preserve. The Adirondack Park Agency has already designated a scenic vista of Whiteface Mountain and the High Peaks. Along the back of the property is the Bloomingdale Bog, which is the third largest boreal peatland in New York. Vista like the Glenview Preserve, which doesn’t involve a climb and is also accessible to all. This poses the perfect opportunity to establish universal trails for all to enjoy. Conservation of land is made possible by connections that people make to the land. If there is no connection to nature, it could be destroyed without anyone speaking up. The location of this tract of land makes it ideal for accessible trail since there is no mountain to hike to get the view. Hiking is one of the oldest pastimes of the world. People can experience beauty every season of the year. It strengthens our bodies and minds at no cost. Hiking is a wonderful chance to feel the earth below your feet and get up close and personal with nature. Installing trails would not only open up recreational opportunities such as hiking, running, and bird watching, skiing and snowshoeing but also build community.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Sustainability Studies
Year: 2017
File Attachments: Capstone_Final.docx
Authors: Valerie Hoffman

Planning for Accessibility in Wilmington Notch New York State Campground

Tue, 05/02/2017 - 10:47
Abstract: A paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree Bachelor of Science in Park Conservation Management
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Parks and Conservation Management
Year: 2017
File Attachments: KIC Document 1.pdf
Authors: Christina Barton, Elayna Grove, Spencer Nolan, Katherine Nussbaumer

Forest Structure and Composition in the Smitty Creek Watershed

Wed, 12/14/2016 - 09:56
Abstract: The 2016 Smitty Creek CFI (Continuous Forest Inventory) study addressed the issue of creating a reliable and repeatable inventory design to examine general forestry trends and their relationships with the watershed itself. Identifying these trends and their consequences is important when considering factors linked to climate change, such as carbon storage and allocation. The objective of this project were as follows: establish 10 new CFI plots, monitor and record for signs of disease and insects, tree mortality, and overstory wildlife habitat, accurately estimate forest carbon sequestration, record understory composition in a 1/50th acre area around each plot center, and suggest methods and reasons for application in Paul Smith’s College CFI capstone projects. The study was conducted within the Smitty Creek watershed in Paul Smiths, NY with the plots falling on a transect that runs north and south. At each plot, trees within the radius were assigned numbered aluminum tags, trees were measured at diameter at breast height, and other features, such as snags, were recorded. Upon completing the project, 10 CFI plots had been created and their locations were recorded, several diseases and forest health concerns were identified, as well as, tree mortality and wildlife habitat considerations, carbon sequestration for the watershed was modeled over the next century, and a CFI project was designed for the Paul Smith’s College land compartments. The Smitty Creek watershed CFI project is repeatable and has an accurate baseline of information for future studies, and the Paul Smith’s College land compartments CFI plot design is ready for implementation.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry
Year: 2016
Authors: Gregg Slezak, Leonard Johnson, William O'Reilly, Jake Weber, Charlie Ulrich, Collin Perkins McCraw, Jake Harm, Nick Georgelas

Flight of 5 Food Truck Company

Tue, 04/26/2016 - 10:16
Abstract: The Flight of Five Food Truck Company is run by Catherine Bergman and her colleague Malik Pryce. They are both hard working and determined business workers. Catherine Bergman has her degree in Food Service and Beverage Management and Culinary Arts and Malik Pryce has worked in many restaurants where he has been on his way into a management position and has been working with Catherine since 2015. The Flight of Five Food Truck Company is located and run in Lockport New York. Where weIt has a plan on selling items named after local colleges’ and universities’ names and mascots. The Flight of Five Food Truck Company is named after the 5 five locks on the Erie Canal, we and this company wanted to have a historical tie in to our business and the town.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2016
File Attachments: Flight of FIve final.docx
Authors: Catherine Bergman

Jenkins Café

Wed, 04/27/2016 - 07:25
Abstract: Jenkins’ Café will be a quick service café establishment located at the base of Jenkins Mountain, along the trail systems of the Visitor’s Interpretive Center (VIC). The VIC has recently become an entity of Paul Smith’s College, allowing greater flexibility of management, away from State jurisdiction. About three miles into the VIC’s trail system is the base of Jenkins’ Mountain, the location for Jenkins’ Café. Jenkins’ Café will serve local residents, Paul Smith’s College students, and VIC visitors’ quick meals consisting of sandwiches, soups, and salads while they utilize the VIC trails. Warm and cold beverages will also be available for service, including a small selection of beer and wine. Hikers, cross-country skiers, bird watchers, snowmobilers, and anyone participating in any VIC activities, can enjoy these fares when they arrive at Jenkins’ Café.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2016
File Attachments: Capstone Final.docx
Authors: Jeffrey Weis, Niklas Van Den Woldenberg

Pair and Compare Capstone

Thu, 04/28/2016 - 13:15
Abstract: Pair and Compare is a business concept that came from the culmination of a four year degree in Food Service and Beverage Management at Paul Smiths College. This capstone is broken into two parts. The first is a wine/tea tasting and food pairing prototype event that showcased possible pairings to collect data. The second part is to use the data and research to determine if a viable and profitable business similar to this event can be realized
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2016
Authors: Nicholas Komninos

Silvicultural Analysis of Northern Hardwood Regeneration at the Paul Smith’s College FERDA Plots

Mon, 05/02/2016 - 10:20
Abstract: In the northeastern forests most regeneration comes from natural regeneration that occurs after a disturbance. The Forest Ecosystem Research Demonstration Area (FERDA) plots located on the Paul Smith’s College VIC in the Adirondack Park are set up as an experiment to test different harvest methods in northern hardwood forests and see the results of each. We analyzed tree and sapling size class inventory data from clearcut, single-tree selection, and control treatments to compare regeneration present 14 years after the first harvests occurred. The clearcut treatments were the only treatments analyzed where American beech (Fagus grandifolia) was not the most abundant tree regeneration present. Both single-tree selection and control treatments were dominated by American beech with few other species present. Our results suggest that creating larger canopy openings, may allow species other than American beech, such as red maple (Acer rubrum) and yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis) to become the most abundant species present.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Forestry
Year: 2016
File Attachments: Capstone.pdf
Authors: Zachary McLellan, Justin Saville