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Capstone Projects

A Comparison of Winter Wildlife Use of Minimally, Moderately and Highly Impacted Shorelines on Lower St. Regis Lake and Black Pond in the Adirondack Park, NY

Wed, 05/09/2018 - 10:51
Abstract: Continued development and human interference with freshwater shorelines creates a degraded environment and can negatively affect native wildlife along impacted areas. Throughout the Adirondack Park, shorelines have experienced substantial degradation with the development of lakeside summer homes. There tends to be a strong preference for the aesthetics that lakes offer, as well as the numerous recreational opportunities they provide. The increased human use of shorelines and the development of anthropogenic structures has directly resulted in the degradation of shorelines in the Adirondack Park. Likewise, the Paul Smith’s College shoreline along Lower St. Regis Lake has been subjected to degradation throughout the history of the campus. This highly impacted site was selected, alongside minimally and moderately impacted sites in the surrounding areas as representatives for different impact levels. Shoreline degradation includes a decline in the health and presence of natural vegetation, creating a decrease in available food source for native wildlife. The removal of natural vegetation creates a decline in shoreline stability with the removal of root systems, allowing for greater amounts of erosion to occur. Additionally, degradation decreases available canopy cover and increases exposure of wildlife to predation. The objective of this study was to determine the difference in wildlife activity and diversity between three levels of shoreline impacts: minimal, moderate, and high. It was expected that the minimally and moderately impacted shoreline sites would show a greater diversity and abundance of wildlife than highly impacted shorelines. Trail camera data was analyzed at three sites for each treatment on Paul Smith’s College property, along both the Lower St. Regis Lake and Black Pond. Although we detected no significant differences in either activity or diversity across the treatments, there was higher relative activity and diversity in moderately impacted shorelines than minimally or highly impacted. However, wildlife species that are more rare and/or area-sensitive, such as the fisher (Martes pennanti) and American marten (Martes americana), were only detected in the minimally impacted shorelines of Black Pond. A restoration of the highly impacted shoreline to reflect minimally and non-impacted shorelines of the surrounding region would allow for opportunities to improve habitat for native wildlife species.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Ecological Restoration, Environmental Sciences
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Shoreline Restoration
Authors: Tessa White, Caroline Matuck, Kasey Lane, Rosemary Bloodnick, Kyle Pasanen, Annalee Kraai

"Pickling in Dessert Products"

Mon, 05/07/2018 - 11:38
Abstract: History of pickling and the different methods that can be used. The Pickling of fruits and vegetables in dessert products.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2018
Authors: Kayla King

Chocolate

Fri, 05/04/2018 - 15:03
Abstract: Chocolate is found everywhere but not usually thought about in savory dishes. Most people also do not think about what chocolate goes through to become a finished product. In my dinner, I showed how chocolate can be used in a four-course meal. My paper then goes through how cocoa is grown, the process, fair trade chocolate, health benefits, history, cocoa uses, and different kinds of chocolate.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2018
Authors: Amber Noecker

Roots of Paul Smith’s - Interpreting Our Past to Inspire Our Future : A conceptual design for an interpretive trail guide exhibit on Paul Smith’s College campus

Tue, 05/10/2016 - 13:17
Abstract: It is a pivotal time for Paul Smith’s College (PSC) where many of those directly involved with its inception are no long with us. PSC history was shaped by the Adirondack wilderness and together they influence how the college is run today. This project aimed to create the conceptual design for an interpretive trail exhibit on PSC campus. I worked with a professional exhibit designer to develop artistically inspired signage using archival photos to bring to life the heritage and natural history of the Paul Smith’s. Extensive research, input from stakeholders, and professional design guidance were utilized to create the content for six interpretive signs, a conceptual design, two formative evaluations, an estimated budget, and two campus sustainability fund proposals. These signs are meant to engage and inspire the current and future members of the Paul Smith’s College community, to build a deeper appreciation for the heritage that makes us unique.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2016
Authors: Leanne Ketner

An examination of sustainable agricultural practices of small scale dairy farms in the Adirondack North Country of Upstate New York

Mon, 05/01/2017 - 09:14
Abstract: This study examines the sustainable practices of small scale dairy farms in the Adirondack North Country of Upstate New York. The results of this study can assist farmers in developing and implementing sustainable agriculture practices specific for small scale dairy farms in the North Country. Methods for research include farm tours as well as in person interviews with the farmers which will provide an understanding of what farming practices are currently being implemented as well as identifying what potential practices may be implemented. The information that is gathered can also be helpful with legislative processes. It may provide law makers and various agencies with valuable information that can help create guidelines and regulations that support sustainable farming methods as well as assist farmers in understanding their challenges and successes in reaching both economic and environmental sustainability
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2016
Authors: Steven Vincent

Proposal for a Pet-Friendly Residence Hall

Fri, 04/27/2012 - 15:42
Abstract: A “pet friendly” college campus is one that allows students to house their pets with them; including in dorm rooms and other designated areas. This research is to investigate the appropriateness of having a pet-friendly campus at Paul Smith’s College. This investigation will show the psychological and physiological advantages of having pets as companions in a college setting, as well as determine if the current population (students, faculty and staff) is amenable to this model. The model for this project and a large portion of support herein was conducted by visiting the SUNY Canton campus and their pet-friendly residence hall. The data and observations were collected by interviewing the students who owned pets at the campus and gaining insight as to the emotional and physical support they felt the pets provided to them. Interviews were also conducted at the Office of Residence Life and the physical dorm itself was toured for this presentation. In conclusion, the proposal will show support for and suggest the renovation of a current dorm – likely Clinton or Lambert Hall – and the creation of a fenced in exercise area in which to maintain any foreseeable canine residents. This project will lay the ground work for making the Paul Smith’s College campus a more diverse and appealing environment for students and faculty alike.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2012
Authors: Ashley Keith

The Waterhole's Upstairs Music Lounge Marketing Plan

Fri, 04/27/2012 - 11:31
Abstract: With any music venue attracting more customers through efficient ways of marketing is paramount. The Waterhole’s Upstairs Music Lounge located in Saranac Lake, New York, is the basis of this study to create a marketing plan for the establishment that will increase the volume of business. Information has been collected using surveys delivered to the local community. Further, interviews with The Waterhole’s staff members about the type of advertising they perceive reaches the market most effective were conducted. Using the information this research has developed ways The Waterhole can market itself more efficiently using print, radio, and social media advertising.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2012
Authors: Dustin S. Dwyer

Creation of an Electronic Guide for Supplemental Instruction Leaders in Financial Accounting

Fri, 04/27/2012 - 11:07
Abstract: Created by University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC), supplemental instruction (SI) is an academic assistance program centered on peer-led sessions, used at centers of higher education world-wide, including Paul Smith’s College. In recent years, training for SI leaders at Paul Smith’s College has been put on hold while training of peer tutors, or those that work under SI leaders, is on-going. Although SI leaders get training during their tenure as peer tutors, further training is necessary to be an effective leader in a group setting. Investigating UMKC standards, Paul Smith’s students’ opinions, and current Paul Smith’s SI leaders’ opinions, it has been determined that more training for SI leaders at Paul Smith’s College should be offered. To facilitate additional training, a strategy is under consideration that is two-pronged: the use of Moodle (a copyright academic course management tool) and a guide for new SI leaders in the course of Financial Accounting (ACC 101). Together, this strategy will provide general knowledge about SI, techniques for a successful SI session, experiences from past SI leaders in course materials, and other insights that may be helpful to a new SI leader.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2012
Authors: Sara Glabien

The Distribution of Northern Harriers (Circus cyaneus) in Northern New York State in Relation to the Availability of Habitat Types

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 18:55
Abstract: Northern Harriers (Circus cyaneus), a bird of prey species, are widely distributed throughout the United States generally at low densities. Harriers are found in New York State, although they are less common than in the Midwest. As the harrier is a species of concern in some regions, it is important to understand how land cover types can affect the distribution of Northern Harriers over time, within a given area. Specifically, this study investigated whether the distributions of Northern Harriers are dependent upon habitat type, and if the frequency of habitat types significantly affects the abundance of Northern Harriers. The area selected for this study includes the majority of New York State to the North and East of Watertown. This region was selected because data indicates that harrier populations have declined from 1980 to 2005. In addition, this region encompasses mountainous areas as well as lower, relatively flatter land outside of the Adirondacks which represents most of New York State. Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems were utilized to determine land cover types for the region. These land cover types were then combined with New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s Breeding Bird Atlas survey blocks. Dominant cover types for each survey block were determined, and the region as a whole was compared to survey blocks within which harriers were present. This process was completed for the years 1984 and 2005, two years in which the Breeding Bird Atlas data were collected for New York State. By using Remote Sensing and GIS, a clearer understanding of the relationship between cover type frequency and harrier presence was possible. Results indicate that Northern Harriers are significantly selecting habitat from land cover types in a proportion different to that which is available. Land cover in this region has shifted throughout the time covered in this study. In addition, a trend of open habitat being chosen over closed canopy habitat is evident. Understanding harrier selection of land cover types can greatly affect management strategies, practices and funding, as the specie is listed as threatened in New York State. The results of this study support much of the available scientific literature on harriers, which state that harriers require a combination of open canopy habitats, including early successional habitat with low vegetative cover.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2012
Authors: Kelly Hoffman

An Analysis of Possible Forest Type Shifts due to Asian Longhorned Beetle Invasion in the Northern Hardwood Forest of Hebron, NY

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 18:10
Abstract: The Asian Longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) is an invasive alien insect that poses a severe threat to forests of the northeastern United States. If this insect is allowed to run rampant through our forests there will be huge economic and ecological implications. This study hopes to provide a better understanding of these potential implications and provide potential policies for managing and controlling this insect that has potentially devastating effects on the hardwood forests of the northeast. The study on hand will explore the effects on current forest types in Hebron, NY and what future regeneration may look like in the aftermath of an ALB infestation. ALB has the potential to completely change not only the landscape but also alter current markets based around the northern hardwood stand type. This study was designed to attempt to grasp the magnitude and effects of an infestation by ALB. Current policies were reviewed to attempt to create a possible set of management strategies that could be used to minimize the effects of the ALB. Possible forest type shifts were predicted for the area based upon species range and soil types present in the study area. It is important to understand not only what ALB is capable of but also what can be expected to happen if or when it does move through the area.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Complete Project.docx
Authors: Leonard Jenkins, Robert Bell, Schuyler VanAuken