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Capstone Projects

A Comparison of Winter Wildlife Use of Minimally, Moderately and Highly Impacted Shorelines on Lower St. Regis Lake and Black Pond in the Adirondack Park, NY

Wed, 05/09/2018 - 10:51
Abstract: Continued development and human interference with freshwater shorelines creates a degraded environment and can negatively affect native wildlife along impacted areas. Throughout the Adirondack Park, shorelines have experienced substantial degradation with the development of lakeside summer homes. There tends to be a strong preference for the aesthetics that lakes offer, as well as the numerous recreational opportunities they provide. The increased human use of shorelines and the development of anthropogenic structures has directly resulted in the degradation of shorelines in the Adirondack Park. Likewise, the Paul Smith’s College shoreline along Lower St. Regis Lake has been subjected to degradation throughout the history of the campus. This highly impacted site was selected, alongside minimally and moderately impacted sites in the surrounding areas as representatives for different impact levels. Shoreline degradation includes a decline in the health and presence of natural vegetation, creating a decrease in available food source for native wildlife. The removal of natural vegetation creates a decline in shoreline stability with the removal of root systems, allowing for greater amounts of erosion to occur. Additionally, degradation decreases available canopy cover and increases exposure of wildlife to predation. The objective of this study was to determine the difference in wildlife activity and diversity between three levels of shoreline impacts: minimal, moderate, and high. It was expected that the minimally and moderately impacted shoreline sites would show a greater diversity and abundance of wildlife than highly impacted shorelines. Trail camera data was analyzed at three sites for each treatment on Paul Smith’s College property, along both the Lower St. Regis Lake and Black Pond. Although we detected no significant differences in either activity or diversity across the treatments, there was higher relative activity and diversity in moderately impacted shorelines than minimally or highly impacted. However, wildlife species that are more rare and/or area-sensitive, such as the fisher (Martes pennanti) and American marten (Martes americana), were only detected in the minimally impacted shorelines of Black Pond. A restoration of the highly impacted shoreline to reflect minimally and non-impacted shorelines of the surrounding region would allow for opportunities to improve habitat for native wildlife species.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Ecological Restoration, Environmental Sciences
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Shoreline Restoration
Authors: Tessa White, Caroline Matuck, Kasey Lane, Rosemary Bloodnick, Kyle Pasanen, Annalee Kraai

Chocolate

Fri, 05/04/2018 - 15:03
Abstract: Chocolate is found everywhere but not usually thought about in savory dishes. Most people also do not think about what chocolate goes through to become a finished product. In my dinner, I showed how chocolate can be used in a four-course meal. My paper then goes through how cocoa is grown, the process, fair trade chocolate, health benefits, history, cocoa uses, and different kinds of chocolate.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2018
Authors: Amber Noecker

"Pickling in Dessert Products"

Mon, 05/07/2018 - 11:38
Abstract: History of pickling and the different methods that can be used. The Pickling of fruits and vegetables in dessert products.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2018
Authors: Kayla King

The Application of Silvicultural Treatments to Establish and Maintain Early Successional Habitat in the Adirondack Forests of New York State

Sat, 04/29/2017 - 15:12
Abstract: Early successional habitat (ESH) in New York state can be described as young forests comprising trees, shrubs, grasses, and other herbaceous plants that form relatively open canopies with dense understories. ESH has decreased due to nearly ninety percent of the naturally occurring shrublands of North America having been destroyed. The destruction of this habitat is of top concern due to the threatened and endangered species whom rely on these sorts of habitats to thrive. Considering the future climate projections, population models, and theoretical species distribution, responsible stewardship is needed to manage in favor of ESH types. A meta-analysis of various journals and databases was performed to synthesize information into a general management plan for establishing ESH in the Adirondacks. Through combining methods and silvicultural management practices from past plans in the northeastern United States, as well as background knowledge of the area, this management plan has been tailored specifically for an Adirondack forest. These outlined silvicultural treatments may also be extended to a variety of other forest types in the eastern U.S.A. Re-establishing young forests throughout the region is the goal of this plan. In doing so, these practices will enhance the health, resiliency, and biodiversity of the Adirondack region, and New York State by creating critical ESH which the fauna and flora of this region depend upon.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Integrative Studies, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2017
Authors: Nicole Morin, Ryan Baker, Ora Bice

Tiny houses for families

Tue, 05/02/2017 - 20:54
Abstract: Houses have changed in size and style over the centuries. We looked at tiny houses and research the economic and social benefits and issues with raising a family in a tiny house. We limited the family to four and made our house 800 square feet. We looked at case studies of families who are currently raising a family in a tiny home to find out what they say their problems may be. We found many unexpected benefits in our research. Many families believe that aside from the economic benefits, raising a family in a tiny home forces the family to be close and to communicate with each other. We interviewed a contractor, Harry Gordon, who gave us information in the building of sustainable housing. There was also a survey we conducted from the Paul Smith’s Community. The survey gave us data on the amount of people who were willing to raise a family in a tiny home. In our results, we found that for those willing to try to raise a family in a tiny house, it is very feasible.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy, Natural Resources Sustainability Studies
Year: 2017
Authors: Kimberly Yager, Sandra Esparza

Roots of Paul Smith’s - Interpreting Our Past to Inspire Our Future : A conceptual design for an interpretive trail guide exhibit on Paul Smith’s College campus

Tue, 05/10/2016 - 13:17
Abstract: It is a pivotal time for Paul Smith’s College (PSC) where many of those directly involved with its inception are no long with us. PSC history was shaped by the Adirondack wilderness and together they influence how the college is run today. This project aimed to create the conceptual design for an interpretive trail exhibit on PSC campus. I worked with a professional exhibit designer to develop artistically inspired signage using archival photos to bring to life the heritage and natural history of the Paul Smith’s. Extensive research, input from stakeholders, and professional design guidance were utilized to create the content for six interpretive signs, a conceptual design, two formative evaluations, an estimated budget, and two campus sustainability fund proposals. These signs are meant to engage and inspire the current and future members of the Paul Smith’s College community, to build a deeper appreciation for the heritage that makes us unique.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2016
Authors: Leanne Ketner

An examination of sustainable agricultural practices of small scale dairy farms in the Adirondack North Country of Upstate New York

Mon, 05/01/2017 - 09:14
Abstract: This study examines the sustainable practices of small scale dairy farms in the Adirondack North Country of Upstate New York. The results of this study can assist farmers in developing and implementing sustainable agriculture practices specific for small scale dairy farms in the North Country. Methods for research include farm tours as well as in person interviews with the farmers which will provide an understanding of what farming practices are currently being implemented as well as identifying what potential practices may be implemented. The information that is gathered can also be helpful with legislative processes. It may provide law makers and various agencies with valuable information that can help create guidelines and regulations that support sustainable farming methods as well as assist farmers in understanding their challenges and successes in reaching both economic and environmental sustainability
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2016
Authors: Steven Vincent

White-tailed Deer Browse Preference: A Comparative Study of the Catskill and Adirondack Mountain Regions, New York State

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 14:23
Abstract: Abundant white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in New York State, United States, affect forest regeneration and stand composition through feeding (browse) pressure. White-tailed deer browse preference of six different hardwood tree species in two mountain ranges, the Catskill and Adirondack Mountains, within New York State were compared in order to determine the extent of browse selection by deer. There were no statistically different browse selection by white-tailed deer within the Catskills or Adirondack study area or between each study site. Visual analysis of the study areas after concluding the study revealed that red maple (Acer rubrum) was the preferred browse species at each study site.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Title, abstract, TOC , Report
Authors: John MacNaught, Blaine Kenyon, Mark Staats, Travis Boucher, Noah Finlayson-Gesten

Topaz Detailing

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 11:21
Abstract: Topaz Detailing plans to be the only mobile detailing presence in the northern Bergen County NJ area that people trust their cars with. Trust us how? Trust us in making their car look as good as or better than the day they drove it off the lot. The service that Topaz Detailing provides uses a very safe paint correction process that has been in used all over the world for many years. The process can be used to correct anything from holograms, swirl marks and shallow scratches in the clear coat of the car caused from daily driving and use of improper materials. Using this method by repeating certain key steps can remove up to 100% of the visible blemishes on the paint can be corrected while making the car look like new. The full paint correction process starts with a basic waterless wash with distilled water and lubricants to get rid of most of the contaminants. Second, the car will be clayed to remove the contaminants were not removed from the first step and that can’t be seen. Third, the car will be compounded with a dual action orbital polisher to remove most of the swirl marks and scratches, this step may be repeated as many times as necessary to achieve desired results. Fourth, the car will be polished with oils; this will give the car (especially darker ones) a high gloss as well as remove very minor swirl marks. Finally, the car will be given two thin protective coats of wax which helps improves appearance as well as act as a barrier that will protect the paint from the elements. This simple process is what automotive detailers around the world use. Short-term goals for Topaz Detailing would be to stay in business and expand our customer base so we can saturate the market in Northern Bergen County and surrounding towns. Long-term goals would be to expand the business and get a garage so detailing can be done in the winter months and on rainy days. Another automotive detailer will be hired to operate the van and still keep our business mobile. What makes Topaz Detailing special: as opposed to the competitors in the area, Topaz Detailing will be run out of a van. This gives the company a few specific advantages A) customers will find it more convenient that the detail shop comes to them B) they will not have to worry about getting the car they need to detail to the shop and find a ride back and C) customer will not have to waste any valuable time getting the car to a shop, we come to you!
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Topaz Detailing 2.docx
Authors: Karl Schubert

Effective Computer Services

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 12:51
Abstract: Effective Computer Services (ECS) is a full service computer company with focus on personal computers and repair. Catering to the needs of the individual, ECS offers a personal touch of on-site service, repair, and software training. ECS offers a range of services from virus removal, data backup or file recovery, to complex small business networking. Effective Computer Services has the resources to complete a project on time and within with minimal turn-around time and at industry competitive prices. ECS offers a variety of new, used, and loaner computers. Its commitment to customer complete satisfaction and convenience is paramount. ECS works directly with customers to determine computer products that match users’ needs. ECS offers free consultation with any purchase from small personal computers to large network infrastructures
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2015
File Attachments: ECS bplan final (1).docx
Authors: James Finizio