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Capstone Projects

Zack Nation: Lake Placid's Newest Oddity

Wed, 05/06/2020 - 12:12
Abstract: My project was done to help show and confirm what Zack Nation: A Pop Culture Odyssey would have to do to break free of all loans and go from a dependent company to an independent one. The work at Zack Nation has been done over the course of three years. Two and a half years went by before I came on board to help advertise and manage the company. The current loan is upwards of $400,000 from one man who shall remain nameless for legal reasons. He also owns a business in Lake Placid and was the man who brought Zack Delia, owner of Zack Nation into Lake Placid and into business. In respect for us at Zack Nation all names other than mine and Zack Delia will not be used in the project.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2020
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Me

Hermit Hill Vintage Business Strategy

Wed, 05/13/2020 - 13:55
Abstract: Our capstone project was to help a local business in Hermit Hill Vintage Antiques with a business strategy and marketing plan. Through this we created ways for them to increase the number of customers as well as create a social media presence. We looked at their current business strategy, then created a new revamped one for Hermit Hill Vintage with a higher focus on marketing with many suggestions.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2020
Authors: Nicholas McCabe
Melanie Montealegre

Food Sustainability

Sun, 05/03/2020 - 22:50
Abstract: The purpose of my research was to find and use the various methods of food sustainability. That meant participating in the local farmers market and getting to know the community and sustainable practices. This research also gave me the chance to look at different cultures and practice of whole animal cooking, how they give back to their environment. This became more than just putting food on the plate, it's about how we get it there and what was done to accomplish that. What can we do in a modern era to keep sustainability alive and keep our stomachs full? Hopefully I was able to line out the few suggestions in my paper.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
File Attachments: Joe's Research Paper.docx
Authors: Joseph Martin

Vegetarian and Plant-Based Food

Tue, 05/05/2020 - 10:01
Abstract: Serving Vegetarian and Plant-Based food in a Restaurant
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
File Attachments: Finished Capstone .docx
Authors: Abigayle Brietzke

Fusion Confusion

Wed, 05/06/2020 - 10:27
Abstract: Fusion cuisine is confusing is a statement and a question. The question half of it is a double-edged answer. Fusion is in itself simple but, when applying it to food, the idea can get muddled. To fully understand the meaning of this we will have to take a deeper look at the history behind food itself. Afterall knowledge is to be built on a strong foundation, much like food.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
File Attachments: Capstone Profolio.docx
Authors: Shawna Gomez

Umami

Fri, 05/08/2020 - 13:48
Abstract: Information about Umami
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
Authors: By: Vera Fatta

Sun Bear (Helarctos malayanus) 20-year Management Plan for Lao People’s Democratic Republic

Tue, 04/28/2020 - 15:54
Abstract: Sun bears (Helarctos malayanus) are the smallest member of the Ursidae family and are native to large, undisturbed dipterocarp tropical forests in southeast Asia. They are omnivorous with a diet consisting primarily of fruit and insects. Sun bears are solitary and historically avoid areas with a strong human presence. These preferred areas are decreasing in abundance in Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR) as the nation’s economy grows with its timber industry, causing widespread deforestation. The lack of available forests for sun bears inhibits the ability of juveniles to disperse from their mother’s dens, decreasing their survivorship. Deforestation has also forced sun bears to live in closer proximity to humans, especially in agricultural areas. This causes interactions in the form of crop raiding and property damage, bringing economic harm to farmers in Lao PDR. These negative interactions have also caused farmers in Lao PDR to have a negative opinion of sun bears on their farms, increasing adult sun bear mortality from these interactions. Sun bear populations in Lao PDR are projected to decline by 17% over the next 20 years if no management action is taken. This management plan seeks to stabilize the sun bear population in Lao PDR. As habitat availability is declining, increasing the population is not feasible. The objectives to attain a stable population are to increase the survivorship of sun bears during their mother-dependency period and of the adult stage class. This includes increasing cub survivorship by 5%, yearlings by 4%, and juveniles by 1.5% in 20 years and adults by 1% in 10 years. To increase survivorship of mother-dependent sun bears, planning in forestry operations will be implemented to decrease disturbance levels of these operations and increase their efficiency. Reforestation through plantations will also be initiated in previously deforested areas. Finally, all bear bile extraction farms will be located and shut down to prevent poaching. This plan also looks to improve the opinions of farmers towards sun bears. Objectives to achieve this goal includes reducing the number of farmers who view sun bears as a hindrance to agricultural production by 10% over 15 years and decreasing the number of farmers experiencing property damage by 50% over 20 years. Actions to decrease the proportion of farmers who view sun bears as a hindrance include the establishment of a crop insurance program with the Lao PDR Ministry of Forestry to offset losses of farmers due to damage from wildlife and other natural events. Surveys will also be distributed to gather up to date information regarding the current state of the relationship between farmers and sun bears, and what farmers feel should be done to help them. To decrease property and livestock damage, trained livestock guard dogs (LGD) will be distributed to farmers as a deterrent to keep sun bear off their property. Another preventative measure is to establish electric fences around crops to exclude sun bears from these areas as well as provide a deterring effect from the electric shock. These management actions will likely cause an initial increase in the population above a stable level; however, after 5 years the population will reach a level that can be maintained beyond the 20-year management timeline for up to 100 years.  
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2020
File Attachments: Monroe 2020.04.28.pdf
Authors: Richard Monroe

Twenty-year Long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) Management Plan for Eastern North America

Thu, 04/30/2020 - 11:44
Abstract: Long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) are a migratory sea duck with a circumpolar distribution. Since they are an arctic species and breed outside of current breeding bird surveys there is little data for their demographics and no data specific to eastern North America (Atlantic Flyway and Mississippi Flyway). Over the last 30 years their population has declined by 50%; this causes concern that the species could be at risk of becoming endangered if the trend in population numbers continues. This management plans goal is to increase and stabilize long-tailed ducks population numbers over the next 20 years. This will be accomplished by decreasing the bycatch of long-tailed ducks in commercial gillnet fisheries by 10% and reducing the total number harvested through hunting per year by 10%. To better monitor this progress a breeding bird survey will be established in their eastern North American breeding area. Surveys and alternative fishing methods will be introduced to commercial gillnet fisheries to raise awareness about bycatch of long-tailed ducks and seabirds in general. By the end of this 20 year management plan, it is expected that long-tailed ducks, along with seabirds and other arctic bird species breeding outside of current breeding bird surveys, will benefit from these actions.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2020
Authors: Megan Lazarus

Fifty-Year Mary River Turtle (Elusor macrurus) Management Plan for Eastern Australia

Thu, 04/30/2020 - 12:15
Abstract: Mary River turtles (Elusor macrurus) are environmental specialists and are endemic to the Mary River system in Queensland, Australia. They are highly dependent on cloacal respiration, and are capable of spending up to 72 hours underwater in a single dive. Mary River turtles are a long-lived species, typically not reaching sexual maturity until 30 years of age. Conservation issues for this species include the following: exploitation of nests for the pet trade, loss of habitat connectivity due to the creation of dams, predation of nests by mesopredators, and nest mortality due to inundation of nests by floodwaters. Climate change poses additional risks towards this species due to rising temperatures and increased duration of droughts. There are two goals for this management plan, they include: (1) to restore the Mary River turtle population in Queensland, Australia to sustainable levels, and (2) to restore connectivity of the Mary River system in Queensland, Australia to promote the interaction of the local people with Mary River turtles. In order to reach these goals, multiple objectives have been established, they include: (1a) increase Mary River turtle nest survival by 50% in the Tiaro region of Queensland, Australia over the next 10 years, (2a) increase the number of nesting female Mary River turtles to 50% of the female population over the next 25 years, (1b) increase connectivity of Mary River turtle habitat by 50% over the next 50 years, (2b) increase public support for Mary River turtle conservation by 50% over the next 10 years. Objective 1a will be reached by protecting existing Mary River turtle nesting sites from mesopredator predation. Objective 2a will promote the creation of suitable nesting habitat to attract additional female turtles to nest in a protected area. To satisfy goal 2, objective 1b will be reached by establishing a suitable flow regime for 50% of the dams along the Mary River, which will reduce hypoxic environments to support Mary River turtles. Objective 2b will be reached by educating the public about Mary River turtles, as well as involving the public with the implementation of the management plan through volunteer positions. By fulfilling the goals set forth in this management plan, it will allow for the formation of a long-term/successful Mary River turtle management plan.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2020
File Attachments: Sojka 2020.04.30.docx
Authors: John Sojka

Twenty-Year Management Plan for Northern Long-eared Bat (Myotis septentrionalis) populations in the United States

Thu, 04/30/2020 - 12:32
Abstract: Since the onset of white-nose syndrome in 2006, bat populations have been declining rapidly. For the northern long-eared bat, Myotis septentrionalis, this rate was as high as 75% in some years. With such high mortality it will not take long for the species to be extinct, modeling suggests it could be as soon as within the next 10 years (Appendix B). Unfortunately, white-nose syndrome is not the only issue M. septentrionalis face. They are a tree-roosting migratory bat which means they are highly impacted by windmills and their increasing construction. Bats are struck by the windmill blades, along with the impacts of habitat fragmentation that the windmill construction creates. It is important to implement a management for M. septentrionalis immediately because they provide important ecosystem services to the agriculture community. Northern long-eared bats eat crop pests which increases the yield on those crops, this ultimately leads to a reduction of pesticides farmers need to use and lower food prices. Northern long-eared bats combat more than just crop pests, they eat mosquitos too! Ultimately, if this management plan is executed successfully, northern long-eared bat populations will be restored and farmers will be able to reduce the amount of pesticide use and food prices will remain low.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2020
Authors: Hunter LaBombard