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Capstone Projects

Lower St. Regis Lake Survey: A Comparative Study of Fish Population Structure and Function over Time

Thu, 12/13/2018 - 14:24
Abstract: Lake surveys are performed on bodies of water to provide a health analysis of fish populations over time. Lake surveys can be conducted in a variety of ways to attain specific data. Lower St. Regis Lake was surveyed to determine the fish community composition and to understand fish population traits. Using fyke nets placed at six predetermined locations for 24 hours, as well as fishing, we collected data for age, length (mm), weight (g), and parasites present. Data was analyzed in the lab using Excel to form graphs and tables to demonstrate our findings. Catch rates were lower compared to years before and comparing our data to New York State Department of Conservation data found that our length-at-age data was lower for the six-species sampled. Pumpkinseed and yellow perch were the only two species to have over twenty fish sampled. Decreased air temperatures brought in by a cold front during the week of our sampling may have been a reason for our lower number of fish caught. Mesh size is also a bias while using these nets as smaller fish can escape, and predatory fish can prey on smaller fish while in the net. Some species of fish such as black crappie may be more susceptible to capture due to its habit of associating with structure.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Environmental Sciences, Environmental Studies, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Capstone_Final.docx
Authors: Deacon Chapin, Jared Chlus, Louis Daversa, Jon Herrman, Robert Visicaro

Effects of Silvicultural Treatments on Wildlife Communities at the Paul Smith's College Forest Research Demonstration Areas

Fri, 05/11/2018 - 16:15
Abstract: Logging has drastically altered North American forest ecosystems for centuries. While extensive studies have been done to determine the impacts of different silvicultural practices on plant communities, minimal research has evaluated the impacts on wildlife communities, particularly in the Adirondack Mountains. Silvicultural practices may significantly impact wildlife communities due to the disturbances it causes, as well as the way it alters the habitat. We monitored winter wildlife communities in the Forest Ecosystem Research Demonstration Area owned by Paul Smith’s College in the Northern Adirondack Park. By analyzing the data collected by trail cameras, tracks and measuring percent browse, we compared the abundance and diversity of wildlife in three silvicultural treatments (i.e., clearcut, group selection, control). We also collected data regarding the physical aspects of the silvicultural treatment plot (i.e. canopy cover and snow depth) to indicate the kind of available habitat. We found that despite there being the highest average relative activity in group selection, there is no significant relationship between average relative activity and harvest treatment type. Using the Shannon-Weiner Diversity Index, we found that the highest diversity was in control/reference. Due to our limited treatment sample size, we did not have conclusive findings in most areas of our study. However, the highest total tracks and relative activity were found in the clearcuts. We suggest that more research be done on this study in order to eventually make forest management plans that properly account for both plant and wildlife species.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Biology, Environmental Sciences, Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Jacob Adams, Caitlin De Bellis, Tyler Fisk, Hyla Howe, Mark McHugh, Daniel Sutch

A Comparison of Winter Wildlife Use of Minimally, Moderately and Highly Impacted Shorelines on Lower St. Regis Lake and Black Pond in the Adirondack Park, NY

Wed, 05/09/2018 - 10:51
Abstract: Continued development and human interference with freshwater shorelines creates a degraded environment and can negatively affect native wildlife along impacted areas. Throughout the Adirondack Park, shorelines have experienced substantial degradation with the development of lakeside summer homes. There tends to be a strong preference for the aesthetics that lakes offer, as well as the numerous recreational opportunities they provide. The increased human use of shorelines and the development of anthropogenic structures has directly resulted in the degradation of shorelines in the Adirondack Park. Likewise, the Paul Smith’s College shoreline along Lower St. Regis Lake has been subjected to degradation throughout the history of the campus. This highly impacted site was selected, alongside minimally and moderately impacted sites in the surrounding areas as representatives for different impact levels. Shoreline degradation includes a decline in the health and presence of natural vegetation, creating a decrease in available food source for native wildlife. The removal of natural vegetation creates a decline in shoreline stability with the removal of root systems, allowing for greater amounts of erosion to occur. Additionally, degradation decreases available canopy cover and increases exposure of wildlife to predation. The objective of this study was to determine the difference in wildlife activity and diversity between three levels of shoreline impacts: minimal, moderate, and high. It was expected that the minimally and moderately impacted shoreline sites would show a greater diversity and abundance of wildlife than highly impacted shorelines. Trail camera data was analyzed at three sites for each treatment on Paul Smith’s College property, along both the Lower St. Regis Lake and Black Pond. Although we detected no significant differences in either activity or diversity across the treatments, there was higher relative activity and diversity in moderately impacted shorelines than minimally or highly impacted. However, wildlife species that are more rare and/or area-sensitive, such as the fisher (Martes pennanti) and American marten (Martes americana), were only detected in the minimally impacted shorelines of Black Pond. A restoration of the highly impacted shoreline to reflect minimally and non-impacted shorelines of the surrounding region would allow for opportunities to improve habitat for native wildlife species.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Ecological Restoration, Environmental Sciences
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Shoreline Restoration
Authors: Tessa White, Caroline Matuck, Kasey Lane, Rosemary Bloodnick, Kyle Pasanen, Annalee Kraai

A Healthier Lunch Line

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 19:57
Abstract: Unhealthy eating is an epidemic in America that is passing from generation to generation. It is becoming more crucial to find ways that can change eating habits at a young age due to the influx of marketing influences. This study will show whether educational marketing or aesthetic marketing is more effective on children’s food choices. The educational marketing will be implemented by interactive taste testing with the students, while the aesthetic marketing will be done by encouraging healthy eating with various wall illustrations and posters in the cafeteria. Both sets of data will be gathered before and after to be compared for effectiveness. Schools are currently struggling to find a way to encourage healthy eating with food that is appealing to a grade school student. If the presentation of food is part of a solution, then this study can help prove that simple changes to the cafeteria setting can reinforce children’s perception of health and help fight obesity and other health issues.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management, Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2011
Authors: Amiee Derzanovich, Morgan Horwatt

Promoting Conservation of Biodiversity in the Adirondack Park Through Understanding and Engaging Stakeholders

Thu, 02/09/2012 - 11:31
Abstract: Anthropogenic disturbance of natural environments has led to the widespread loss of native biodiversity and degradation of ecosystems. It is increasingly recognized that addressing this “biodiversity crisis” entails understanding the societal drivers of unsustainable patterns of use. Conservation psychology is a new discipline that specifically focuses on understanding the linkages between human behavior and action and promoting a healthy and sustainable relationship between humans and nature. In this project, we employed principles of conservation psychology with the goal of improving the efficacy and efficiency of conservation of biodiversity in the Adirondack Park (AP). To meet this goal we employed three specific strategies. The first of these strategies was the use of surveys to assess the values, attitudes, and actions different stakeholders have in regards to conservation of biodiversity in the AP. These surveys were disseminated via both direct mailings and online, and included 30 questions. Our second strategy was to use discourse analysis to create a dictionary of terms and phrases employed in a positive, neutral, and negative light in regard to conservation of biodiversity. This entailed analysis of 30 emic accounts derived from opinion articles written by stakeholders in the AP, as well as analysis of a number of etic accounts drawn from online sources. Our third strategy was to use conservation psychology literature to assess ways in which the presentation of information and peer-dynamics influenced the responses of stakeholders towards conservation of biodiversity. Using the combination of these three strategies, we were able to provide a holistic understanding of how different stakeholders in the AP perceive and act towards biodiversity conservation; identify language that can be used to illicit a more positive response from these stakeholders; and identify specific tools based on principles of psychology that can encourage more active and effective engagement in conservation of biodiversity by different stakeholders. Our research findings will allow groups focusing on promoting conservation of biodiversity in the AP to be more effective and efficient in their work in the future.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2011
Authors: Christopher Critelli, John Ghanime, Derek Johnson, Samantha Lambert, Justin Luyk, Matthew Parker, Robert Vite, Heather Mason, Jesse Warner, Ethan Lennox, Sarah Robbiano, David Mathis, David A. Patrick

Paul Smith's College Bed and Breakfast

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 21:25
Abstract: Paul Smith's College hosts numerous events, conferences, and open houses throughout the years that bring people to the area for an extended period of time. Currently, there is a house on campus with a fantastic lakeside view that is no longer being occupied. Bed and Breakfasts consist of several different departments: food and beverage, housekeeping, bookkeeping, management, tours, and various other occupations. Converting this house into a Bed and Breakfast would be an immense asset to the school. Opening this Bed and Breakfast would potentially be a benefit for Paul Smith's College, the students, and future guests. This study will determine if it is possible for Paul Smith's College to open and operate a Bed and Breakfast on campus, and if there will be enough of a guest interest for it to be successful. The opinions of potential guests will be measured by surveys and interviews, and will take a look at some competing properties and how they market to their customers. The consensus will be used to determine what Paul Smith's should do to market, advertise, and appeal to its clientele.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2011
File Attachments: Final Capstone.docx
Authors: Megan Frank

Self-Ordering Systems in Casual Dining Restaurants

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 21:24
Abstract: Communicational technologies in restaurants have been a growing and changing trend in the hospitality industry since the early 90's. The impact of self-ordering technologies in restaurants has caused customer value, satisfaction and productivity to change. The baby boomers and millennials are a few age demographics affected by these systems in restaurants. It is important to determine how willing baby boomers and millennials are in accepting self- ordering systems in casual style restaurants such as, AppleBees, TGI Fridays or Olive Garden. This data will be collected through surveys, along with the use of social media. The opinions will help to determine if these customers are willing to take the step towards a more technology- based restaurant industry.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2011
File Attachments: Laura James FINAL CAPSTONE
Authors: Laura James

The VIC as a Teaching Aid

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 21:18
Abstract: Paul Smith’s College has recently acquired ownership of the Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) and its land. Paul Smith’s College offers many academic programs that closely align with events and learning opportunities at the VIC. The size of the student body and availability of learning resources are growing every year at Paul Smith’s College. The Facilities, Planning and Environmental Management class at Paul Smith College is an example of one class that is incorporating the VIC into their course. One of the group projects which students are completing in the classroom is a mock design of a kitchen and café in the existing main building of the VIC for everyday use as well as for events. This case study will determine if Paul Smith’s College’s hospitality students and professors are interested in utilizing the VIC as learning and working experience in their curriculum. The case study will also determine where in the curriculum the hospitality students and the professors see the VIC being incorporated. I will survey Paul Smith’s professors and students to see whether the VIC could be a beneficial learning tool for students, as possible hands on working experience.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2011
File Attachments: CAPSTONE FINAL COPY.doc
Authors: Kristopher P. Klinkbeil Jr.

Wording Behind the Menu

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 20:14
Abstract: When it comes to menu designing there are many reviewers that range from the average person to a professional menu designer. When you are deciding to have your own restaurant you should choose what type of restaurant you want to be. A menu for a fine dining restaurant should have different words for the descriptions of the menu items compared to a causal restaurant or family restaurant. Many customers for a fine dining restaurant want the menu to have certain words on the menu such as local, organic or “fancier” words. Many restaurant guests are willing to pay for fine dining as long as it is good, the words you use on the menu can help make the dish sound good. There are some rules and guidelines that can help a restaurant owner make a successful menu based on the restaurant type. If a certain rule or guide line is not followed correctly then the restaurant and menu will be criticized by the reviewers. This study seeks to determine if the Taste Bistro at the Mirror Lake Inn in Lake Placid, New York has a menu that is worded to fit the type of restaurant the owners and the restaurant manager believe it is.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2011
Authors: Lindsay Mitchell

Paul Smith's College Role: Should Paul Smith's College Provide a Culture Class For Students Studying Abroad?

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 18:15
Abstract: Successful college studying abroad experiences can be greatly enhanced if students take a few preparatory steps before leaving the United States. This study seeks to enhance the study abroad experience of Paul Smith's College students by exploring secondary research related to study abroad experiences and by conducting primary research of students’ study abroad experiences. The results of this study will serve as a justification for production of a guide for Paul Smith’s College students as they prepare for study abroad experiences. Results indicate that students prefer an orientation course prior their study abroad experience, as they feel this will help them get the most out of their time immersed in another culture.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2011
File Attachments: Final.docx
Authors: Keali Lerch