After logging in with the login link in the top right, click here to upload your Capstone

Capstone Projects

Glenview Preserve: Sustainable Farming Methods

Thu, 12/13/2018 - 12:05
Abstract: In 2016, the Glenview Preserve was purchased by the Adirondack Land Trust, with a goal to maintain and preserve the two agricultural fields on the property. The farmer that leases the two fields from the Adirondack Land Trust will have to use sustainable farming methods to farm the fields, so that the biodiversity of the fields and also the Bloomingdale Bog are protected. There are three different farming intensities, which are low intensity, medium intensity and high intensity. The farmer should use low intensity farming because if the farmer used high intensity the ecosystems that are present on the Glenview Preserve property would be severely impacted. The farmer will most likely maintain the current fields by mowing the fields with a mowing machine, which has negative impacts on the land such as soil compaction. With the types of soil that the agriculture fields have, it is advised that the current fields remain hay fields and that different grasses and legumes that benefit the farmer’s livestock are grown. The farmer that leases the property from Adirondack Land Trust will have to decide if they will use draft horses, modern haying equipment or a mix of both to harvest the hay fields. No matter which way they choose to harvest the hay fields they will have to be sustainable, be able to develop ways to preserve the grassland bird species and maintain the Adirondack hayscape.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2018
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Dustin Clark

Would an underpass/tunnel on Keese Mills Road decrease the percentage of amphibian mortality due to road mortality?

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 18:09
Abstract: Road Mortality has had a huge impact on Amphibian populations worldwide. Several options are available to help maintain and preserve migrating populations across roadways. One method that is looked at during this study is underpass and fencing. In this study, I assessed the need for an underpass and if it could help reduce the amount of amphibian’s mortality by traffic and, if an underpass is necessary, properly predict a location. I also looked at if underpasses alone could reduce the mortality of amphibians. I constructed arrays and pitfall traps to simulate an underpass on Keese Mills Road at Paul Smiths and Santa Clara, Franklin County New York. I predicted that underpass would decrease the amount of amphibian being slayed. I also predicted that certain locations would have more usage then others. The results showed that there was no significant difference between the location of the sites and whether they would be used by the amphibians. The results also showed that there was no correlation between the species that were captured and the species that were killed.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Biology
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Jorge Velazquez

Examination of Potentially Ectoparasite-driven Behavior in Burrowing Owls: Tests of Alternative Hypotheses

Thu, 05/07/2015 - 19:06
Abstract: Burrowing Owls (Athene cunicularia) and their nests harbor at least 39 species of arthropods from 21 different families. Among the ectoparasites on Burrowing Owls are fleas, which are primarily Pulex irritans (Family Pulicidae), the human flea. Fleas can number in the hundreds on individual Burrowing Owls. Thus, we hypothesized that flea infestation has shaped Burrowing Owl behavior to avoid the costs of ectoparasitism. As part of experiments using infrared trail cameras deployed at Burrowing Owl nests in southern Idaho ¬¬during 2012-2013, we noticed apparent sunning behavior in both adult and nestling Burrowing Owls. Camera images captured owls lying on the ground with wings outstretched and flat. We only observed this behavior during daylight hours, although cameras were active for 24 h/day. Sunbathing in birds is often associated with ectoparasite reduction, although sunning has not previously been examined in relation to flea infestation. During 2014 we conducted an experiment that included fumigating some nests with a flea removing insecticide and examined the prediction that sunbathing would occur more frequently in control nests where ectoparasites remained. As sunning was not during the coolest parts of the day, it did not appear to function for warming. Also, we ultimately found no difference in the frequency of sunning in fumigated and control nests, and there was no relationship between sunning and abundance of fleas on owls. Thus, the evidence is not consistent with the ectoparasite hypothesis, as owls sunned irrespective of flea load. We also evaluated the alternative hypotheses that sunning was related to thermoregulation, anting, drying or feather degrading bacteria. The first three we were able to reject, and the last will need future research.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Skyler Wysocki

Compaction of Hiking Trails Located in the Northeastern Area of the Adirondack State Park, New York

Mon, 04/29/2013 - 12:19
Abstract: With continued increases in outdoor recreation in the United States, the physical impact of that use needs to be monitored for its effects. The purpose of this study was to explore whether a relationship exists between traffic numbers and soil strength of trails in the High Peaks Region of New York’s Adirondack state park. Soil strength was used as a measure of compaction because of its ability to indicate certain aspects of soil physical properties like bulk density, and hydrological condition (Mirreh & Ketcheson,1972), which are also soil physical properties that are effected by compaction (Hanna & Al-Kaisi,2009). These physical properties are important factors which influence a soils ability to carry out its biotic and abiotic processes (Kozlowski,1999). Initially the relationship between average soil strength of trails and traffic was insignificant. Upon further analyzing the data we found a significant relationship between on-trail and off-trail soil strength and used this relationship to create on-trail residual soil strengths. This was done to remove the influence that off-trail soil strength was having on the traffic vs. soil strength relationship. With the on/off-trail relationship influence removed, the relationship between on-trail residual soil strength and traffic was significantly improved. Literature discussed showed how the soil strengths collected could be used to infer possible effects on the sites tested. Relations between soil strength and bulk density, root elongation, root penetration, and trail recovery were all reviewed to provide insight on the quality of the soil at sample sites.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2013
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Karl Van Osch

Multigenerational Vacations and Family Resorts

Wed, 12/04/2013 - 19:23
Abstract: Currently there is a large number of Baby Boomers that are taking their children and grandchildren on vacations and they are the ones paying for it all. What is not known is how and to what extent this new type of travel will impact family resorts. The purpose of this study is to identify the impact of Baby Boomers taking more multigenerational vacations on family resorts. This is a descriptive, exploratory research method. The central question is how this new type of travel will impact family resorts. A survey will be used to collect information from different family resorts. The family resorts will be located all over the country. The information gathered from this survey will be compiled based on what this segment of travel wants and requires. This study will help family resorts plan for the future to ensure that this new segment of travel is happy and continues to stay there.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Rielly Kavanaugh

Preservation & Expeirece

Fri, 12/06/2013 - 19:04
Abstract: This quantitative study is designed to determine how and to what extent cultural heritage travelers who have journey to the Mexico's Ancient Ruins experienced limitations set as a result of needed preservation to prevent future deterioration caused by natural and anthropocentric factors. Preservation methods set and monitored by the National Institute of Anthropology & History (INAH), the National Commission for Protected Natural Areas (CONANP), however do they take from the experience? The ruins chosen for this study are the Pre-Hispanic City of El Tajin, the Pre-Hispanic City & National Park of Palenque, and the Pre-Hispanic City of Chichen Itza .The methodology that will be used in this study is data collection and analysis. Data from research will be collected to gain a numeral estimate of tourist who experienced limitations as a result of prevention methods used to preserve the Ruins of Mexico. The ultimate significance of this study is to provide awareness of the possible limitations preservation methods can have on the tourist’s experience, this information is not provided in studies.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Voniesha Brown

Destination Attachment: Connecting and Learning in New Orleans

Mon, 04/22/2013 - 11:47
Abstract: Educational experiences have the potential to connect the participant to a destination and its people. Food plays a large part in perception of the destination. Learning about food and actively engaging in its creation can be a unique experience. Destination attachment leads to loyalty and repeat visits. The purpose of this study was to investigate how and to what extent the leisure traveler can develop destination attachment in result of participating in educational cooking experiences at a specific destination. This qualitative, inductive relationship study explored how and to what extent offering cultural cooking classes to the leisure traveler at a destination relates to destination attachment. Data was collected through an online survey distributed to class participants. Opinions about the educational cooking experience were collected and analyzed to gauge if the cooking experience had any effect on destination attachment. Destination institutions will be interested in this data if they are looking into offering cultural educational cooking experiences.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Elise Wallner

Guest Retention due to Value-Added Services within Resorts: A study of the relationship between value added services and guest loyalty in both large and small resorts

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 00:52
Abstract: The resort market is currently an industry of service, rather than simply selling rooms as it was in the past. The concept of a value-added service during a stay in a resort rather than a tangible room is now very important to an individual guest. The purpose of this project is to find out if value-added services make or break the potential for a first time guest to become a return guest. Also, the study shows if these value-added services contribute to customer loyalty. The methods used show the link between a value-added stay and return guests of both small boutique hotels and larger resorts. This data was collected through the form of interviews of front office managers of these types of resorts. The significance of this project will aid hoteliers in both small and larger resorts in deciding the type of service provided by their employees. It will also show them what additional services not already put in place they may want to implement to further guarantee repeat guest business.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Ashley Booton

Bringing Families Back to the Drive-In

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 17:55
Abstract: Drive-in theaters have been in existence since 1933. However, within the past 30 years the number has been declining. Now there are indications that they have been making a comeback. The number of operating drive-in theaters went from 366 in 2011 to 368 this year according to drive-ins.com. This study seeks to determine how drive-in theater can appeal to families, and how they may best cultivate their comeback. The opinions of both families and drive-in theater owners will be gathered through the use of surveys. The results will be used to determine what steps drive-in theater owners will take to attract more families back to the drive-in theater also what features families would want available at the drive-in theater. The long term goal is help the family become a unit.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Eric Kowalik

Monitoring the Zebra Mussel Invasion Front: Use of New Technology

Thu, 02/09/2012 - 15:39
Abstract: Zebra mussels are invasive mollusks that are affecting the well-being of the water bodies in the United States. This study uses environmental DNA (eDNA) is a sensitive early detection system that may be useful in monitoring their spread. The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of eDNA technology in identifying infested water bodies, to determine if zebra mussel DNA is in the Adirondack water bodies not known to be infested, if the water chemistry of these water bodies is favorable for zebra mussel establishment, and if the eDNA technology is transferable to an institution like Paul Smith’s College. Eighteen lakes, all in New York State were sampled, fifteen of which are located in the Adirondack Park. DNA was extracted from water and plankton samples and species specific primers were used for PCR amplification to determine if zebra mussel DNA was present. Of seven samples taken from sites known to be infested, five of these tested positive for zebra mussel eDNA. Four lakes not known to be infested within the Park also tested positive for zebra mussel eDNA. Based on zebra mussel risk parameters (water chemistry) applied to 1,469 Adirondack water bodies, less than 3% are at risk of zebra mussel establishment. However it is possible that established populations could occur at microsites that may have locally high levels of calcium and higher pH.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Environmental Sciences, Environmental Studies, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2011
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Alexandria Bevilacqua, John Bishop, Charles Cain, Tyler Clark, Seth Crevison, Robert Culyer, Ryan Deibler, Brian DeMeo, Jonathan Eckert, Kirsten Goranowski, Joelle Guisti, Alan Jancef, Korinna Marino, Michelle Melagrano, KaitlynNedo, Joseph Nelson, Aaron Palmieri, Cole Reagan, John Scahill, JohnathanStrassheim, Scott Travis, Sarah Van Nostrand and Sarah Vella