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Capstone Projects

Lower St. Regis Lake Survey: A Comparative Study of Fish Population Structure and Function over Time

Thu, 12/13/2018 - 14:24
Abstract: Lake surveys are performed on bodies of water to provide a health analysis of fish populations over time. Lake surveys can be conducted in a variety of ways to attain specific data. Lower St. Regis Lake was surveyed to determine the fish community composition and to understand fish population traits. Using fyke nets placed at six predetermined locations for 24 hours, as well as fishing, we collected data for age, length (mm), weight (g), and parasites present. Data was analyzed in the lab using Excel to form graphs and tables to demonstrate our findings. Catch rates were lower compared to years before and comparing our data to New York State Department of Conservation data found that our length-at-age data was lower for the six-species sampled. Pumpkinseed and yellow perch were the only two species to have over twenty fish sampled. Decreased air temperatures brought in by a cold front during the week of our sampling may have been a reason for our lower number of fish caught. Mesh size is also a bias while using these nets as smaller fish can escape, and predatory fish can prey on smaller fish while in the net. Some species of fish such as black crappie may be more susceptible to capture due to its habit of associating with structure.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Environmental Sciences, Environmental Studies, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Capstone_Final.docx
Authors: Deacon Chapin, Jared Chlus, Louis Daversa, Jon Herrman, Robert Visicaro

A Taste of Duck

Mon, 05/07/2018 - 09:17
Abstract: A four course meal based around duck.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Taylor Engel

A Taste of Local Goat Cheese

Sat, 12/08/2018 - 11:22
Abstract: This capstone features the variety of goat cheeses in each of the courses!
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Julia Ho(:

Mycophagy of the Adirondacks

Sat, 12/08/2018 - 11:26
Abstract: Throughout the course of mushroom history, they have gained multiple reputations, being known as a food source or a deadly fungus. According to Tori Avey, she believes that “Over the years reckless mushroom hunters have thrown caution to the wind with fatal results, giving food safe mushrooms a bad reputation. Which resulted in two very different categories of people mycophiles, those who love mushrooms and mycophobes those who fear mushrooms.” (Avey,T) Mycophagy is the practice of consuming fungus collected in the wild, also known as eating foraged mushrooms. Mushrooms are grouped into the vegetable category within the local grocery stores, but they are not a vegetable mushrooms are a type of edible, poisonous, psychedelic, and medicinal fungus with over 400 different species. Many Mycophiles believe we are currently, in the beginning of a myco-revolution many people are now interested in the wide range of gourmet wild mushrooms “The name “mushroom” has been given to over 38,000 varieties of fungus that possess the same threadlike roots and cap.” (Avey,T)
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Selena C. Hay

A Taste of Paul Smith's & The Adirondacks

Sun, 12/09/2018 - 15:50
Abstract: Using what we have learned over the last four years our task was to put on a themed Capstone Dinner. This dinner was experiential and progressive, guests were transported to different parts of the Paul Smiths College campus for each course of the dinner. The focus of this Capstone was to capture the essence of the Adirondacks to portray it through a five course meal. I first looked to the woods for help building inspiration for each dish. Along with the dinner, comes many other tasks from ordering to costing.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Sean Conroy

Wetland X: Wetland Mitigation Plan Amendment

Mon, 12/03/2018 - 17:56
Abstract: Wetland X is a wetland that is located in Western New York and has been converted to agricultural land. The goal of this study was to create a restoration plan for Wetland X that meets Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) standards. The study took place during June 2018 with the final plan being completed in August of 2018 and the data analysis report being completed in the fall of 2018. The focus of the study was on the woody vegetation of the site to document the species present and the density of vegetation on the site. Vegetation was sampled on four plots located at different areas of the site to provide the best representation of the sites overall conditions. The areas were sampled using zigzag transects and grid transect patterns; with one area being sampled using the zigzag pattern, two using the grid pattern and one using both transect methods as a comparison of the two methods. Sampling of the site found that an amendment was needed for Wetland X to ensure that the landowner remained in compliance with the Food Security Act Standards. The restoration plan focuses on planting and management techniques for the site that will allow proper growth of desired vegetation species and the eradication of the invasive species. The created restoration plan amendment has been implemented and will be completed by June of 2019 with five years of monitoring following completion.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Ecological Restoration
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Pratt_Capstone_2018.docx
Authors: Thomas Pratt

Paul Smith’s College Shoreline Restoration Conservation Plan

Fri, 12/14/2018 - 12:24
Abstract: A restoration plan was created for the Lower St Regis Lake shoreline of Paul Smith's College. To date, about 140 students have participated by way of studies and course work in surveys and assessments, which clearly indicate a much reduced level of biological diversity, ecosystem function, and human uses compared to other sites. The plan is designed based upon field assessments and with the intentions of using the shoreline as an on-site case study of experiential education – a tradition of at the core of Paul Smith’s College. The aim of the restoration plan is to increase biodiversity, ecosystem function, aesthetics, educational studies, and shoreline use.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Ecological Restoration
Year: 2018
Authors: Hunter Gaudette
, Joseph Hollner
, Jonathan Meadows
, Ryan Morr
, Sara Savoia, Cassandra Schrader

Lyme Disease in the Adirondacks: Using Domestic Canines as Sentinels for Human Risk

Tue, 12/05/2017 - 14:46
Abstract: Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi) is the most prevalent zoonotic disease in the United States. With an increase of cases every year in new areas, it is crucial that researchers and veterinarians use sentinels, such as canines, to determine the prevalence of Lyme disease in emerging areas where tick density may be low. The main objective of this study was to determine the annual infection rate of Lyme disease in canines in Franklin and Essex County. An immunologic assay was performed to determine percent of canines exposed to Lyme bacteria as well as timing of exposure. Thirty-four random blood samples were collected from a local veterinary office during routine health screenings, and analyzed for Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies. Out of the thirty-four samples, two canines were positive for OspC antibodies (indicator of early infection) and three were positive for OspF (indicator of chronic infection). The annual infection rate for the 2017 year was 5.9%.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2017
Authors: Ashley G. Hodge

Riparian log gardens: examination of vascular plant communities and moss on logs in waterbodies

Tue, 12/05/2017 - 19:51
Abstract: Microsites can play a major part in facilitating plant diversity. Specific physical characteristics of microsites can create favorable conditions for certain species by isolating them from competition or protecting them from herbivory. Plant communities and woody debris can also facilitate the growth of other plants. I examined relationships between moss and vascular plants on log gardens in waterbodies to determine correlations between these organisms. I hypothesized that riparian log gardens, large woody debris in lakes and ponds supporting mats of terrestrial vegetation, serve as sites that may harbor rare species or have high plant species diversity. I also examined the relationship between bryophytes and plant communities based on the idea that bryophytes influence microsite characteristics. Knowing where rare species are harbored and what microsites encourage high diversity are important for preserving species. I surveyed plants on large woody debris in lakes and ponds in the northern Adirondacks and calculated the richness and diversity of the communities in relation to the presence of mosses. I found that logs that supported moss mats had more plants. The mean species richness of the riparian log gardens was 8.6 for all plants and 6.3 for herbaceous species. Some significant positive correlations were found for log area, log hardness, mat area, mat depth, and vascular plant diversity.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2017
Authors: David R. Lampman

A Taste of Tea

Thu, 11/30/2017 - 14:49
Abstract: Originating in Southeast China, tea is one of the most consumed beverages in the world, second only to water with coffee in third. Though tea has many names, they all come from the same plant, Camellia sinensis. There’s white, yellow, green, oolong, pu-erh, and black or red tea; each has its own variants and processing methods to distinguish them. Tea has spread throughout the world and each culture took these leaves and made it their own in different ways. The journey it has taken is an interesting one with a lot of controversy, conflict, and corruption once introduced to the British Empire.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts, Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2017
Authors: Darren Sheftic