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Capstone Projects

Outward Bound semester: Skills to last a life time

Wed, 12/14/2016 - 10:44
Abstract: The focus of this study will examine the level at which an Outward Bound semester fosters personal growth, connection with nature, and hard skills. This particular Outward Bound semester course traveled from the Florida Keys then on to Costa Rica and Panama in Central America. The course focused on the water elements of sailing, surfing, whitewater rafting, scuba diving, and sea kayaking. Methods used include personal journal reflections, peer and instructors oral and written responses. The researcher was an active participant in the immersive experience and kept a journal of the entire experience trying to gather as much information about the course itself and reflecting on the research process throughout. This research indicated that this experience developed personal character and a connection with nature. These skills have an impact deeper than an isolated course with Outward Bound but can be transferred to daily life.
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Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism, Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management, Parks, Recreation and Facilities Management
Year: 2016
Authors: Sam Annable

The Effects on Soil Caused by Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) in a Northern Hardwood Forest in the Northern Adirondack Mountains

Mon, 12/02/2013 - 10:54
Abstract: Plant invasions are thought to be among the worst causes of biological extinction and biodiversity loss in the modern world. With the United States spending upward of thirty four million dollars a year in attempts to control and repair the damages caused by invasive plants, not only are we feeling the biological effects, but we financially cannot afford to keep combating these invasive species (Barto and Cipollini, 2009). Garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) can invade multiple types of sites whether the soil is sandy or if a site has been disturbed. This invasive species will take over the understory and alter soil chemistry (Morris, McClain, Anderson and McConnaughay, 2012). This study aimed to look at how garlic mustard is affecting soils in the northern Adirondack Mountains in New York State. Although currently scattered and not very prevalent, there have already been changes to the soil chemistry. This study was conducted by setting up multiple plots within areas where garlic mustard was present and gathering soil to be used to test for nutrient values. It was found in this study that calcium, phosphorous, magnesium, potassium, sodium, aluminum and soil pH values changed due to the presence of garlic mustard.
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Literary Rights: On
Major: Biology, Forestry
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Capstone Final.docx
Authors: Kyle Dash

A Paleolimnological study of precipitation variability in the Adirondacks over the last thousand years

Mon, 12/02/2013 - 20:40
Abstract: At present, most regional climate models anticipate wetter conditions by the end of this century, but a few models anticipate drier conditions. This study uses foresight to test these models, as well as describe the relationship between the dominant climate system in the region and past precipitation in the Adirondacks. Precipitation was inferred from diatom assemblages observed along a lake sediment core extending into the 1000 years. This study shows that abrupt, extreme wet events were common during the last 1000 years, and a relationship between the dominant climate system (North Atlantic Oscillation) and precipitation was irregular during the cool Little Ice Age but negatively associated during the warm Medieval Climate Anomaly. With temperatures in the Northeast projected to increase by 2-5 degrees C by 2100 AD, our study suggests the region may become more arid rather than wetter, opposite of what models currently suggest.
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Literary Rights: On
Major: Biology, Environmental Sciences
Year: 2013
File Attachments: regalado.serwatka.docx
Authors: Sean A. Regalado, W. Martin Serwatka

The Price Tag of Ambiance

Tue, 12/03/2013 - 18:28
Abstract: The Price Tag of Ambiance is study surrounding customer’s price perception of a restaurant’s application of physical attributes of the establishment itself. Customers expect to pay for what they experience; if the price is too small, the customer tends to get concerned, too high causes a lack of patronage to the establishment. This study looks at price perception in relation to customer’s views of quality of the main aspects that define physical ambiance. Subjects for this study will be Italian restaurants and consumers ranging in ages from 18 through 45. This is beneficial for upcoming restaurateurs, as it allows more insight into what ambiance is worth to a customer, and therefore can raise their price point. This knowledge will assist restaurateurs in judging how to best utilize the physical attributes of the establishment. The study looks a survey given to the target demographic, containing photographs of several restaurants. After which, the participants will be questioned on their thoughts of price at each restaurant.
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Literary Rights: On
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Capstone Proposal Final.doc
Authors: Adam Fisk

Food Allergic Patrons: An exploratory study of controlling allergens

Wed, 12/04/2013 - 17:21
Abstract: In the food service industry there is a consumer market and a need for allergy free options, a.k.a. safe dining options for those consumers who suffer from food allergies. Dining rooms, kitchens and other food handling departments, specifically in hotels, are not allergen free. There is a definite potential for cross-contamination somewhere amongst the flow of food handling. It could be anywhere from the receiving department to the delivery of the finished product at the consumer’s table. The purpose of this study is to determine how and to what extent restaurant management can control harmful food allergens and successfully stop cross-contamination. This qualitative, inductive study will explore and determine in what manner restaurant management and staff can control the spread of harmful allergens within hotels and whether or not there is a foolproof way to stop cross-contamination. Through interview research methods a detailed study on the restaurants’ food handling practices will be conducted. The researcher will interview the employees of the establishment, and through a series of specific questions created by the researcher to establish a standard grading criteria, these results will be analyzed. Once several different establishments have been interviewed and data has been collected, through careful analysis, the researcher will be able to determine if the restaurant’s staff was able to control food allergens at any point. If food establishments within hotels are concerned with making themselves safer and worry-free places for the consumer to eat, they will be interested in using the results of this study to establish safer standards and all around food practices.
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Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Capstone Final
Authors: Evan Sullivan

Investing in Training so that Employees Feel Invested in You:

Wed, 12/04/2013 - 18:41
Abstract: Employee training can be expensive, that is why some employers may choose to cut corners on the training process. They wrongly assume the employee will learn as he/she goes. The employees who cannot learn quickly enough can become a burden to the restaurant and cause it to lose money. The purpose of this study will be to determine how and to what extent do restaurants choose their investments made in employee training to ensure employee satisfaction. This qualitative study will make the connection between the decisions restaurants make about employee training and if the decisions are made with employee satisfaction in mind. Surveys sent to the human resource managers will be the method used for this study. The human resource managers of restaurants will be asked specifically about their decisions in employee training and if the decision making process takes employee satisfaction into consideration. This study will be able to inform restaurants of employee training investments that will ensure employee satisfaction, which can improve business.
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Literary Rights: On
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Young-Capstone.doc
Authors: Clarice Young

Managing Growth: A Study of Succession Practices in Family Restaurants

Wed, 12/04/2013 - 21:59
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to determine how and to what extent the succession and management practice of a family-owned restaurant correlates to its success as a business. This exploratory, qualitative study will ask what do family restaurants consider to be the most successful succession planning strategies in their businesses. This study will help to better understand and identify the significance of succession practices. The methodology used will be a structured interview. The questions asked during the interview will be “yes” or “no” answers with the option to elaborate if necessary. Family restaurants are measured using interviews in Tioga County, Pennsylvania and data will be collected upon interview. Data from the interview will be analyzed and compiled together to show family restaurants optimal succession planning practices. The outcome of this study can be used by family restaurants seeking to pass down their business to younger generations.
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Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: FINAL CAPSTONE.doc
Authors: Elizabeth Compton

Monitoring the Zebra Mussel Invasion Front: Use of New Technology

Thu, 02/09/2012 - 15:39
Abstract: Zebra mussels are invasive mollusks that are affecting the well-being of the water bodies in the United States. This study uses environmental DNA (eDNA) is a sensitive early detection system that may be useful in monitoring their spread. The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of eDNA technology in identifying infested water bodies, to determine if zebra mussel DNA is in the Adirondack water bodies not known to be infested, if the water chemistry of these water bodies is favorable for zebra mussel establishment, and if the eDNA technology is transferable to an institution like Paul Smith’s College. Eighteen lakes, all in New York State were sampled, fifteen of which are located in the Adirondack Park. DNA was extracted from water and plankton samples and species specific primers were used for PCR amplification to determine if zebra mussel DNA was present. Of seven samples taken from sites known to be infested, five of these tested positive for zebra mussel eDNA. Four lakes not known to be infested within the Park also tested positive for zebra mussel eDNA. Based on zebra mussel risk parameters (water chemistry) applied to 1,469 Adirondack water bodies, less than 3% are at risk of zebra mussel establishment. However it is possible that established populations could occur at microsites that may have locally high levels of calcium and higher pH.
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Major: Biology, Environmental Sciences, Environmental Studies, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2011
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Alexandria Bevilacqua, John Bishop, Charles Cain, Tyler Clark, Seth Crevison, Robert Culyer, Ryan Deibler, Brian DeMeo, Jonathan Eckert, Kirsten Goranowski, Joelle Guisti, Alan Jancef, Korinna Marino, Michelle Melagrano, KaitlynNedo, Joseph Nelson, Aaron Palmieri, Cole Reagan, John Scahill, JohnathanStrassheim, Scott Travis, Sarah Van Nostrand and Sarah Vella