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Capstone Projects

Paul Smith's College Athletic Complex: A Vision

Fri, 04/29/2022 - 09:56
Abstract: This capstone investigated the current status of the Paul Smith's College (PSC) athletic complex. It highlighted the deficiencies: trainer’s room, dance room, pool, and locker rooms. It further looked at a vision for upgrades and expansion. This study included an interview with a professional sports trainer, Heather Wilson, from Colgate University. She indicated areas where PSC sports training areas could be improved. Last, we conducted focus groups based on the vision we have developed for the Paul Smith's College athletic complex.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Communication
Year: 2022
Authors: James O. Weathers III, Bailey Loatman and Eddie Kwaw

Outdoor Classroom: Maintenance and Design

Mon, 05/02/2022 - 12:37
Abstract: Taking the classroom outside can have a wide variety of benefits for students' psychological and physical wellbeing. Paul Smith's College currently has one outdoor classroom on its campus as of the Spring 2022 semester to take advantage of these benefits. To expand outdoor learning for courses on Paul Smith's College Campus, we designed a second outdoor classroom. We received input from the Campus community through two survey we developed to discern the need for a second classroom, evaluate the existing classroom, evaluate the accommodations needed, and gain necessary information on other considerations for the design and location. Based on the survey results, using GIS to assess potential locations, and conducting interviews, we chose a site to focus on and developed a maintenance plan for the future management of both the existing and proposed classrooms.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Conservation and Management, Parks and Conservation Management, Sustainable Communities & Working Landscapes
Year: 2022
Authors: Shannon McPheeters
, Rebecca Durinick
, Nathanial Brangan
, Derek Thompson
, Annie DeHaven

Maintenance Plan and Prioritization of Paul Smith's College Back Country Infrastructure

Fri, 04/29/2022 - 15:13
Abstract: This paper consists of a maintenance plan and prioritization of 12 of the worst lean-tos on the Paul Smith’s College campus property. Each lean-to has its own maintenance plan starting with exact coordinates of each lean-to, a brief description of the lean-to that has where its located and how far it is from a specific area along with it's amenities and how far they are from the lean-to. Also, there is a list of issues as to what is wrong with the lean-to, a maintenance list of what needs to be repaired on the lean-to, materials that are needed that tells the reader exactly what they need and the price of those materials. Lastly, the approximate time frame to complete all the work. Each of the 12 lean-tos that are written about in this paper are already in a prioritization order starting with the worst condition lean-to Church Pond Lean-to and the rest of the lean-tos following.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Parks and Conservation Management
Year: 2022
Authors: Garrett Rowlands

Sustainably Developing A Tiny Home Community To Answer The Adirondack Housing Crisis

Mon, 05/02/2022 - 22:29
Abstract: The Adirondack Housing Crisis can be broken down into these root causes. The historical use of the Adirondack State Park as a secondary home location and vacation area and the overall lack of affordable small homes compared to average wages of residents. This paper aims to qualitatively analyze the usefulness of a tiny home village to solve the housing crisis facing the Adirondack park and it's residents.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Parks and Conservation Management
Year: 2022
Authors: Tyler J. Schlesier

Outdoor Classroom; Trail Design

Mon, 05/02/2022 - 23:03
Abstract: Paul Smith’s College needs another outdoor classroom to fulfill the needs of faculty and students for outdoor learning. By adding another outdoor classroom, more students and faculty will be able to have class outside. If mismanaged outdoor classrooms can result in the degradation of the nature the students are supposed to enjoy. Harming the natural landscape of the outdoor classroom is almost as if you’re damaging an outdoor classroom itself. My subject focus on the outdoor classroom design team was creating sustainable trails. Sustainable trails protect the environment, meet user needs and expectations, and require minimal maintenance. This required gathering data from students, faculty, possible sites, and our recommended site. Using this information I created a potential design plan for the trails that can be used by the preexisting and new outdoor classrooms.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Parks and Conservation Management
Year: 2022
Authors: Rebecca Durinick

Citizen Science: A Tool for Better Preserving Backcountry Infrastructure at Paul Smith’s College.

Mon, 05/02/2022 - 22:34
Abstract: The Adirondacks have been home to a many steward of its land. Paul Smith’s College prides itself in encouraging a culture which promotes this long-held ideology to preserve natural resources. It is a school which prides itself in its unique location as well as resources. One of these many resources is its extensive backcountry property and the plethora of structures located within it. Many of these structures are what’s known as lean-tos. Over the course of the 2022 Spring semester, the Parks and Recreation Capstone class surveyed and identified the conditions of 15/16 the school’s remaining lean-tos. A particularly outstanding issue with this however, was the resources and organization required of the school to collect this data. This research paper examines the positive values that the implementation of citizen science programs has had on a national level. Furthermore, my individual contribution to this class’s Capstone was the implementation of a volunteer fed databank exclusively used for the documenting of lean-tos in the Paul Smith’s College backcountry. The scope and intent of this project was to pass this resource on for further development and active use by Paul Smith’s College, related committees, and its backcountry maintenance initiatives.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism, Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management, Parks, Recreation and Facilities Management, Parks and Conservation Management
Year: 2022
Authors: Matthew T. Huffman

Forest Health Assessment: Kate Mountain Farm

Fri, 07/08/2022 - 11:17
Abstract: Disturbances that degrade forested ecosystems can have significant impacts on forest health. These impacts should be of great concern for forest landowners. Natural disturbances such as insect and disease agents, and human caused disturbances such as logging, soil compaction, and pollution can have substantial economic and environmental impacts. It is of great importance for landowners to be given the right knowledge and tools to deal with these disturbances in order to avoid any large-scale losses of timber productivity, degraded water yields, depleted nutrient cycling, and/or decreased biodiversity. Forestland can provide many harvestable natural resources and ecosystem services for very long periods of time if they are managed sustainably and responsibly. This of course entails a forest being composed of healthy thriving trees.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Biology, Environmental Sciences, Forestry
Year: 2021
Authors: Matthew R. Wedge, Erin Reilly

Potential Impacts of Road Salt Applications on Wetland Vegetation in Franklin County, NY

Thu, 07/07/2022 - 09:46
Abstract: With long winters in the Adirondacks, roadside environments are subjected to extended periods of potential pollution from road salt applications. Wetlands support a wide variety of endemic species that are sensitive to chemical alterations in the soil due to extensive road salt applications. This study focuses on the potential impacts that road salt applications have on wetland vegetation within Franklin County in the Adirondack Park of New York. Three sites were located on roads receiving minimal to no road salt applications. The other three sites were located on roads receiving high road salt applications. Each site had three transects evenly spaced, running perpendicular from the road, 100m into the wetland, with plots located at 0m, 50m, and 100m. Measuring percent cover of Obligate (OBL) wetland plant species, Facultative (FACW) wetland plant species, and total wetland plant species between sites, there was no significant difference between the two groups for the percent cover of wetland species. No significant difference was reported for pH values between the two groups. The high road salt sites had significantly higher electrical conductivity values. High road salt sites had a significantly higher plant species richness of OBL plants. No road salt sites had a significantly higher plant species richness of FACW plants. There was no significant difference reported in total wetland plant species richness (both OBL and FACW) between the two different site groups. Relying on only one years’ worth of data, this study serves as a baseline for future projects related to wetland vegetation and road salt applications.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Ecological Restoration
Year: 2021
Authors: Christopher Perrotta

A.P. Smith Rod and Gun Club-Workshop Curriculum

Thu, 07/07/2022 - 14:37
Abstract: A report centered around outdoor education workshops to be hosted by a proposed Fishing and Shooting Club. Pertaining to lesson plans centered around Trap Shooting, Bushcrafting, and Fishing. The use of the Kinesthetic Learning Model is heavily put to use in developing this curriculum.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Ecological Restoration, Forestry, Natural Resources Conservation and Management, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism, Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management
Year: 2021
Authors: Eoghan Walsh, Daniel Klein, Drew Gleason, Kassie Kirkum, Erin Byrant

An Analysis of Invertebrate Richness with Designated Pollinator-Plots on Paul Smith's College Campus

Thu, 07/07/2022 - 15:35
Abstract: Anthropogenic grasslands, areas which have been manipulated by humanity to be species homogenous and are composed primarily of turf-grass species, have been a key fixture in the American landscape for over a hundred years, but little is known about the ecological impacts of these lawn-scapes. Paul Smith’s College has established meadow restoration zones, also referred to as “Pollinator Plots”, in areas that were previously anthropogenic grasslands to collect data regarding various components of meadow restoration and to document successional changes within the sites over several years. This study is the first assessment of invertebrate assemblages within these pollinator plots. Invertebrate assemblages were examined in two meadow restoration groups which include dry-slope plots and moist flat plots. Reference meadows, meadows that have been established for several years and have not been anthropogenically disturbed, were used as a baseline to which the other meadow groups were compared to. Specimens were collected using sweep nets and pitfall traps. Invertebrates were counted and identified to the lowest taxonomic level. Invertebrate richness was highest in reference sites, which are well-established meadows, and moist-flat locations whereas dry-slope locations had the least overall invertebrate richness. The restoration plots had lower invertebrate richness and abundance overall, however, the differences were not large enough to be statistically significant. The data obtained from this assessment is a baseline that can be compared to in future studies in these plots throughout time. Keywords Invertebrate - Pollinators - Grasslands - Lawns - Meadow – Restoration
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Ecological Restoration
Year: 2021
Authors: Savannah Hoy