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Capstone Projects

Analysis of Forage Quality in Adirondack Macrophytes: Implications for Waterfowl Nutrition

Fri, 04/29/2016 - 14:48
Abstract: To understand the relative nutritional value of macrophyte food sources for Adirondack waterfowl, the forage quality of four common Adirondack macrophytes were assessed. An analysis of two native pondweeds (Potamogeton) and two invasive watermilfoil (Myriophyllum) was conducted to deduce how invasive and native macrophytes compare in their relative concentrations of nitrogen and mineral content; important indicators of forage quality for waterfowl. Nitrogen content is used as a metric for relative concentration of protein. Macrophyte species were sampled from four Adirondack lakes of the same trophic status to account for effects of lake nutrient characteristics on plant nutrient uptake and synthesis. Total nitrogen was determined with the Kjeldahl procedure using flow injection analysis. Ash (mineral) content was acquired through high-heat burning in a muffle furnace. The invasive watermilfoil species had a higher percentage of nitrogen than the native species. There was no significant difference in the ash content between the species. It is critical to understand the ecological function of these species in relation to wildlife populations. The nutritional value of these aquatic macrophytes may have implications for the fitness and distribution of breeding herbivorous waterfowl in Adirondack lakes. These results may indicate that invasive plants will serve as a viable food source for herbivorous waterfowl as watermilfoil continues to spread across Adirondack aquatic systems.
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Major: Biology
Year: 2016
Authors: Bianca Fournier

Walden Pond: Ecological and Anthropological History Reflected in the Sedimentary Record

Tue, 05/03/2016 - 23:13
Abstract: This study examined environmental changes reflected in the microfossil record of a sediment core taken in August 2015 from Walden Pond, Massachusetts spanning the last 600 years. In particular changes in the eutrophication status, inorganic sediment deposition due to land use, lake water depth and temperature were examined using phytoplankton indicator species—diatoms and chrysophytes— to reconstruct environmental conditions. The study site was a basin shallower and closer to the source of anthropogenic N and P inputs than the site of previous studies at Walden’s deepest basin, allowing for finer detection of changes in water level and organic content of sediment. A gravity corer was used to collect the sediment core to preserve topmost sediment layers for analysis, as more than a decade has passed since the last published study of this kind at Walden Pond by Köster et. al. (2005). Results show a significant increase in indicators of eutrophic lake conditions since European settlement ca. 1630, and especially since the 20th century. However, relative Asterionella formosa and Synedra nana abundances had not changed significantly in the last decade since Köster et. al.’s 2005 study, and have in fact decreased somewhat, suggesting water treatment efforts by the Massachusetts Dept. of Environmental Protection (DEP) have had some success. Loss on ignition (LOI) of organic content shows a precipitous decline from the mid 19th century from 37% to 22%, representing intensive land clearance and development until the 1970’s when DEP management began. After that point, LOI rose, perhaps due to increased lake productivity, and has fluctuated around 25%. Relative Discostella stelligera abundance, while used in the WAl-3 piston core as a proxy for water depth, could not be used in the WAL-1 gravity core from this study as eutrophication has significantly impacted their abundance. Chrysophyte scale:diatom ratios corroborate an observed trend of increasing abundance in lakes globally since the 20th century, perhaps in response to rising global temperatures over the same period.
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Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2016
File Attachments: Capstone Paper.docx
Authors: Erik Yankowsky

Outward Bound semester: Skills to last a life time

Wed, 12/14/2016 - 10:44
Abstract: The focus of this study will examine the level at which an Outward Bound semester fosters personal growth, connection with nature, and hard skills. This particular Outward Bound semester course traveled from the Florida Keys then on to Costa Rica and Panama in Central America. The course focused on the water elements of sailing, surfing, whitewater rafting, scuba diving, and sea kayaking. Methods used include personal journal reflections, peer and instructors oral and written responses. The researcher was an active participant in the immersive experience and kept a journal of the entire experience trying to gather as much information about the course itself and reflecting on the research process throughout. This research indicated that this experience developed personal character and a connection with nature. These skills have an impact deeper than an isolated course with Outward Bound but can be transferred to daily life.
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Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism, Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management, Parks, Recreation and Facilities Management
Year: 2016
Authors: Sam Annable

White-tailed Deer Browse Preference: A Comparative Study of the Catskill and Adirondack Mountain Regions, New York State

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 14:23
Abstract: Abundant white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in New York State, United States, affect forest regeneration and stand composition through feeding (browse) pressure. White-tailed deer browse preference of six different hardwood tree species in two mountain ranges, the Catskill and Adirondack Mountains, within New York State were compared in order to determine the extent of browse selection by deer. There were no statistically different browse selection by white-tailed deer within the Catskills or Adirondack study area or between each study site. Visual analysis of the study areas after concluding the study revealed that red maple (Acer rubrum) was the preferred browse species at each study site.
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Major: Biology, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Title, abstract, TOC , Report
Authors: John MacNaught, Blaine Kenyon, Mark Staats, Travis Boucher, Noah Finlayson-Gesten

The Effects of Varying Wavelengths of Light on Diatom Movement

Wed, 05/06/2015 - 16:18
Abstract: Diatoms were studied in order to determine in which wavelength of light they would be most active. It was surmised this knowledge would allow easier testing of future diatom movement hypotheses. This knowledge could, in turn, allow control over diatom movement in order to prevent or circumvent hazardous diatom blooms. Specimens were studied using a Parco scientific microscope in a dark room. They were studied both with and without cover slips to ensure the cover slips did not hinder movement. Sheets of high quality color transparency paper were laid over the microscope light, producing a single, strong color. In the end, the diatoms didn’t move at all, no matter the circumstances. The diatoms could have had no reason for movement or have been restricted by the small amount of water on the microscope slide due to the vast difference between the slide and the diatoms’ natural environment.
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Literary Rights: On
Major: Biology
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Diatoms.docx
Authors: Eric Swiecki

Student Health Services: A Feasibility Study for Expansion

Thu, 12/03/2015 - 15:20
Abstract: The problem and solution that this study proposes involves Student Health Services. The problem SHS currently faces is that the wait time to see the nurse on campus varies in length and at times it can take longer than a half an hour for the student to be seen. After in depth analysis and discussions with the SHS Director and sole nurse, the solution proposed is to hire a second nurse.
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Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2015
Authors: Abigail Bailey

"Adirondack Escapes" - Feasibility Study

Thu, 12/03/2015 - 15:55
Abstract: “Adirondack Escapes”, located on Osgood Pond in Brighton, NY, is a yurt-accommodation that offers an affordable rate and comfort. This accommodation will serve primarily as an overnight stay destination for those who like to visit the Adirondack Park. “Adirondack Escapes” would like to one day expand its guests, and potentially, house college students from the two college in the area.
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Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2015
File Attachments: NEW CAPSTONE DEC 3.docx
Authors: Jordan Merry

Topaz Detailing

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 11:21
Abstract: Topaz Detailing plans to be the only mobile detailing presence in the northern Bergen County NJ area that people trust their cars with. Trust us how? Trust us in making their car look as good as or better than the day they drove it off the lot. The service that Topaz Detailing provides uses a very safe paint correction process that has been in used all over the world for many years. The process can be used to correct anything from holograms, swirl marks and shallow scratches in the clear coat of the car caused from daily driving and use of improper materials. Using this method by repeating certain key steps can remove up to 100% of the visible blemishes on the paint can be corrected while making the car look like new. The full paint correction process starts with a basic waterless wash with distilled water and lubricants to get rid of most of the contaminants. Second, the car will be clayed to remove the contaminants were not removed from the first step and that can’t be seen. Third, the car will be compounded with a dual action orbital polisher to remove most of the swirl marks and scratches, this step may be repeated as many times as necessary to achieve desired results. Fourth, the car will be polished with oils; this will give the car (especially darker ones) a high gloss as well as remove very minor swirl marks. Finally, the car will be given two thin protective coats of wax which helps improves appearance as well as act as a barrier that will protect the paint from the elements. This simple process is what automotive detailers around the world use. Short-term goals for Topaz Detailing would be to stay in business and expand our customer base so we can saturate the market in Northern Bergen County and surrounding towns. Long-term goals would be to expand the business and get a garage so detailing can be done in the winter months and on rainy days. Another automotive detailer will be hired to operate the van and still keep our business mobile. What makes Topaz Detailing special: as opposed to the competitors in the area, Topaz Detailing will be run out of a van. This gives the company a few specific advantages A) customers will find it more convenient that the detail shop comes to them B) they will not have to worry about getting the car they need to detail to the shop and find a ride back and C) customer will not have to waste any valuable time getting the car to a shop, we come to you!
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Topaz Detailing 2.docx
Authors: Karl Schubert

HOS 462 Hospitality Business Simulation-OceanView

Sun, 05/03/2015 - 12:20
Abstract: This capstone was a business simulation where student managed and operated an online hotel and restaurant. OceanView was managed and operated by Kadie Ouellette, Ashlee Doele and Veronika Vanisheuskaya. OceanView is located on the beautiful shores of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The reports in this file are the first year business plan, yearly analyses and final business plan.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: HOS 462 OceanView.docx
Authors: Kadie Ouellette, Ashlee Doele, Veronika Vanisheuskaya

Spring 2015 HOS 462- Final Capstone Submission

Mon, 05/04/2015 - 10:54
Abstract: Capstone Project: Our Capstone Simulation Course entailed running a Hotel Property out of Cape Cod Massachusetts. We had to make decisions as a group in order to execute and track the results of how our property was performing on a monthly basis. Our Business Model was targeted more towards business travelers. The following is our Analysis of how our property performed each Year throughout the Semester.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Capstone-Final Submission
Authors: Rebecca Forman, Victor Dickson, Wyatt Gressler