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Capstone Projects

Proposal for Improvements to Alumni Campground Waterfront

Sat, 12/14/2019 - 15:42
Abstract: The Alumni Campground is full of potential. A front country campground in close proximity to many great wilderness experiences. Some of those experiences can be best reached by water and yet the Alumni Campground waterfront is not much more than a single “No Swimming” sign nailed to a tree. This lack of infrastructure has caused degradation of the shoreline as the user base for water craft does use the campground as a starting point for excursions onto the St. Regis waterways but due to a lack of durable launching sites they have created several eroded and denuded spots along the lakes bank. In order to accommodate the amount of use this asset receives and prevent further degradation this proposal is designed to give the Alumni Campground Committee a sensible set of options for structural improvements designed to suit the user bases needs and protect the valuable waterfront resources.
Access: Yes
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Major: Parks and Conservation Management
Year: 2019
Authors: Tobias Calzarette

Riparian log gardens: examination of vascular plant communities and moss on logs in waterbodies

Tue, 12/05/2017 - 19:51
Abstract: Microsites can play a major part in facilitating plant diversity. Specific physical characteristics of microsites can create favorable conditions for certain species by isolating them from competition or protecting them from herbivory. Plant communities and woody debris can also facilitate the growth of other plants. I examined relationships between moss and vascular plants on log gardens in waterbodies to determine correlations between these organisms. I hypothesized that riparian log gardens, large woody debris in lakes and ponds supporting mats of terrestrial vegetation, serve as sites that may harbor rare species or have high plant species diversity. I also examined the relationship between bryophytes and plant communities based on the idea that bryophytes influence microsite characteristics. Knowing where rare species are harbored and what microsites encourage high diversity are important for preserving species. I surveyed plants on large woody debris in lakes and ponds in the northern Adirondacks and calculated the richness and diversity of the communities in relation to the presence of mosses. I found that logs that supported moss mats had more plants. The mean species richness of the riparian log gardens was 8.6 for all plants and 6.3 for herbaceous species. Some significant positive correlations were found for log area, log hardness, mat area, mat depth, and vascular plant diversity.
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Major: Biology
Year: 2017
Authors: David R. Lampman

Lyme Disease in the Adirondacks: Using Domestic Canines as Sentinels for Human Risk

Tue, 12/05/2017 - 14:46
Abstract: Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi) is the most prevalent zoonotic disease in the United States. With an increase of cases every year in new areas, it is crucial that researchers and veterinarians use sentinels, such as canines, to determine the prevalence of Lyme disease in emerging areas where tick density may be low. The main objective of this study was to determine the annual infection rate of Lyme disease in canines in Franklin and Essex County. An immunologic assay was performed to determine percent of canines exposed to Lyme bacteria as well as timing of exposure. Thirty-four random blood samples were collected from a local veterinary office during routine health screenings, and analyzed for Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies. Out of the thirty-four samples, two canines were positive for OspC antibodies (indicator of early infection) and three were positive for OspF (indicator of chronic infection). The annual infection rate for the 2017 year was 5.9%.
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Major: Biology
Year: 2017
Authors: Ashley G. Hodge

The Effect of One’s Origins on Recycling Behavior

Fri, 12/08/2017 - 10:36
Abstract: Recycling, which is valuable to combating pollution, reducing waste, conserving natural resources, and halting global climate change is a relatively easy activity that many can participate in. Research on recycling and what motivates humans to participate in it, has provided valuable knowledge on an individual’s obstacles to recycling. The research I conducted advanced the knowledge we have on how people decide to recycle or not. The research was conducted through surveys and interviews at Paul Smith’s College. The subjects were students, staff, and faculty. It was found that suburban participants were more likely to always recycle as opposed to those from rural areas. Interview participants were found to often cite their parents as reasons for current recycling habits. The results helped to further certain beliefs that parents, friends, and environmental knowledge help to promote positive recycling behaviors.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Studies
Year: 2017
Authors: Kevin Shea

"Adirondack Escapes" - Feasibility Study

Thu, 12/03/2015 - 15:55
Abstract: “Adirondack Escapes”, located on Osgood Pond in Brighton, NY, is a yurt-accommodation that offers an affordable rate and comfort. This accommodation will serve primarily as an overnight stay destination for those who like to visit the Adirondack Park. “Adirondack Escapes” would like to one day expand its guests, and potentially, house college students from the two college in the area.
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Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2015
File Attachments: NEW CAPSTONE DEC 3.docx
Authors: Jordan Merry

Student Health Services: A Feasibility Study for Expansion

Thu, 12/03/2015 - 15:20
Abstract: The problem and solution that this study proposes involves Student Health Services. The problem SHS currently faces is that the wait time to see the nurse on campus varies in length and at times it can take longer than a half an hour for the student to be seen. After in depth analysis and discussions with the SHS Director and sole nurse, the solution proposed is to hire a second nurse.
Access: Yes
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Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2015
Authors: Abigail Bailey

Removing Barriers: Student’s Use of the Paul Smith’s Visitor Interpretive Center

Tue, 12/08/2015 - 16:56
Abstract: The Paul Smith’s College’s Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) has been a staple in the lives of locals and tourists of the Adirondacks. The VIC offers nature-based recreational and educational programs year-round with the assistance of Paul Smith’s College’s students, faculty and staff. The purpose of this research is to take a deeper look into the present barriers preventing the Paul Smith’s College community (student, faculty and staff) from accessing and utilizing the VIC’s building and its trail system. A study was performed to discover barriers to accessing in the VIC area by utilizing surveys, focus groups, on-site visits, program implementation, trail register log, previous recreation capstones, and online resources. The results were analyzed to concentrate specific barriers. Most barriers involved programing, such as expanding current programs, as well as, offering new programs, followed by accessing the VIC, such as adequate signage and map interpretation, and finally access to general information, such as advertising and marketing. Using research from the past and present, this project gives suggestions that would better serve the PSC community by clarifying the needs and desires of the appropriate stakeholders associated with the VIC.
Access: Yes
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Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2015
Authors: Phillip Brandel

Initiatives to Increase Student Use of the Visitor Interpretive Center: A focus on marketing

Mon, 12/07/2015 - 09:18
Abstract: The focus of this study was on marketing the Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) to students and faculty with an overarching goal of increasing student use of the VIC. Through the study market research was conducted to identify the desired programming of the student body and methods of reaching students. Desired programs were then implemented and promoted alongside current programs. Program evaluations were conducted to assess the effectiveness of the marketing research and methods of promotion. Focus groups were held to allow a deeper insight on the preferences of different styles of promotion and the effectiveness of VIC brochures geared towards incoming students and faculty. The results of the study should be used in the future to increase communication between upper level management, and students and faculty regarding VIC resources and programming. The VIC is a resource for education, interpretation, and recreation that is underutilized and could be increasingly influential in the years to come.
Access: Yes
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Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2015
File Attachments:
Authors: Paige Buchholz

Opportunities for Collaboration: A study of the participation in student activities and young alumni giving

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 20:23
Abstract: Student activity programs developed in collaboration of student affairs and alumni offices increase young alumni involvement. The successfulness of student activities in cultivating young alumni donors is unknown. The purpose of this study is to determine if the giving behaviors of young alumni can be enhanced by the participation in student activities. Current “involved” students will be queried through focus groups to gather insights as to their intentions of financial giving upon graduation. Recent graduates between the years 2007-2010 will be queried as to their giving behavior towards the college as well as activity engagement during their years at Paul Smith’s college and specifically what that engagement was. Colleges will better understand the benefits of implementing student activity programs.
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Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2012
Authors: Christine Blakeslee

Risk on the Rocks: A study of risk as related to self efficacy in rock climbing

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 15:50
Abstract: Self efficacy is being confident in ones skills or ability to perform a task and may be directly linked to risk in relation to rock climbing. Risk is exposing oneself to danger that can cause you threat loss or harm. The purpose of this project is to see if there is a direct correlation between the risks that rock climbers take and their experience level. A goal sample of 100 rock climbers will partake in a survey asking questions that will help to estimate confidence, age, gender and risk taking behaviors in climbers. This study hopes to show that climbers are more willing to take risks when they are more confident in their experiences. The significance of this study will be useful to the climbing community as a whole because very little research has been conducted on this specific area of climbing.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Risk on the Rocks Capstone
Authors: Matthew Baer