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Capstone Projects

What Are the Differences in Trichome Density and Morphology Between Arabidopsis Lyrata Subsp. Lyrata Populations When Grown in A Northern Common Garden, Outside of Their Geographic Distribution?

Tue, 04/30/2019 - 15:23
Abstract: Trichomes are diverse among plants. There is evidence suggesting that environmental factors may influence these structures and their densities. Other evidence shows that weather may influence genetics and gene expression. Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata is a wild flower that is native to North America and Europe and has been extensively studied. Literature regarding Arabidopsis states that within the family and genus, there is evidence suggesting that trichomes can be either non-branched, twice branched or thrice branched. This study’s purpose was to analyze how trichome density, and morphology in Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata differs between populations when grown outside of the natural distribution limit. Four populations of Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata were studied based on latitude. After analyzing the outcomes, unexpectedly there are no major differences between the north and south populations; however, there are differences between the four populations. Based on the data gathered, it was determined that the population, North2 (07G) must be genetically different from the other three populations. The four populations were grown together in a common garden; thus, all variables were the same. The environment did not influence trichome density or morphology within the North2 population, therefore the structures were genetically pre-determined.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2019
File Attachments: Scarabaggio_A.docx
Authors: Amber My Scarabaggio

Garlic

Fri, 05/03/2019 - 13:48
Abstract: Research and Capstone dinner about garlic.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2019
Authors: Alan Cary

Planning and Future Management of the Adirondack Land Trust Glenview Preserve

Sat, 05/11/2019 - 08:51
Abstract: The Adirondack Land Trust purchased a 238 acre parcel of land, Glenview Preserve, from the Trevor family in 2016. The Glenview Preserve is located along New York State Route 86 in Harrietstown. The Glenview Preserve already consists of a heavily visited scenic vista of Whiteface Mountain, the McKenzie Range, and other Adirondack High Peaks. The property borders the Bloomingdale Bog, the third largest boreal peatland in New York State. The Glenview Preserve can be a perfect spot to incorporate a trail system to allow visitors the opportunity for non-consumptive recreational activities. When creating a trail system for recreation it is important to examine the impacts on local flora and fauna. A clearly designated trail system is the number one way to mitigate impacts on soil, vegetation, wildlife, and water created by visitors. Within the preserve interpretive signs will be implemented to educate and inform visitors on proper usage of the trail system. The unique thing with the area is the gradual grade of only 50 feet so the breathtaking views are virtually accessible to everyone who visits. Recreational activities allow people to get outside and enjoy nature and hopefully build personal environmental stewardship. The trail system will not only allow recreational opportunities for visitors but establish a sense of an outdoor community.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2019
File Attachments: Capstone_Murray 2019.docx
Authors: Payton Murray

Creation of an Electronic Guide for Supplemental Instruction Leaders in Financial Accounting

Fri, 04/27/2012 - 11:07
Abstract: Created by University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC), supplemental instruction (SI) is an academic assistance program centered on peer-led sessions, used at centers of higher education world-wide, including Paul Smith’s College. In recent years, training for SI leaders at Paul Smith’s College has been put on hold while training of peer tutors, or those that work under SI leaders, is on-going. Although SI leaders get training during their tenure as peer tutors, further training is necessary to be an effective leader in a group setting. Investigating UMKC standards, Paul Smith’s students’ opinions, and current Paul Smith’s SI leaders’ opinions, it has been determined that more training for SI leaders at Paul Smith’s College should be offered. To facilitate additional training, a strategy is under consideration that is two-pronged: the use of Moodle (a copyright academic course management tool) and a guide for new SI leaders in the course of Financial Accounting (ACC 101). Together, this strategy will provide general knowledge about SI, techniques for a successful SI session, experiences from past SI leaders in course materials, and other insights that may be helpful to a new SI leader.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2012
Authors: Sara Glabien

The Waterhole's Upstairs Music Lounge Marketing Plan

Fri, 04/27/2012 - 11:31
Abstract: With any music venue attracting more customers through efficient ways of marketing is paramount. The Waterhole’s Upstairs Music Lounge located in Saranac Lake, New York, is the basis of this study to create a marketing plan for the establishment that will increase the volume of business. Information has been collected using surveys delivered to the local community. Further, interviews with The Waterhole’s staff members about the type of advertising they perceive reaches the market most effective were conducted. Using the information this research has developed ways The Waterhole can market itself more efficiently using print, radio, and social media advertising.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2012
Authors: Dustin S. Dwyer

Proposal for a Pet-Friendly Residence Hall

Fri, 04/27/2012 - 15:42
Abstract: A “pet friendly” college campus is one that allows students to house their pets with them; including in dorm rooms and other designated areas. This research is to investigate the appropriateness of having a pet-friendly campus at Paul Smith’s College. This investigation will show the psychological and physiological advantages of having pets as companions in a college setting, as well as determine if the current population (students, faculty and staff) is amenable to this model. The model for this project and a large portion of support herein was conducted by visiting the SUNY Canton campus and their pet-friendly residence hall. The data and observations were collected by interviewing the students who owned pets at the campus and gaining insight as to the emotional and physical support they felt the pets provided to them. Interviews were also conducted at the Office of Residence Life and the physical dorm itself was toured for this presentation. In conclusion, the proposal will show support for and suggest the renovation of a current dorm – likely Clinton or Lambert Hall – and the creation of a fenced in exercise area in which to maintain any foreseeable canine residents. This project will lay the ground work for making the Paul Smith’s College campus a more diverse and appealing environment for students and faculty alike.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2012
Authors: Ashley Keith

Pop Up Restaurants: Are They Here to Stay? A Study of Consumer and Professional Awareness and Future Demand

Fri, 04/20/2012 - 13:23
Abstract: The focus of this study is to determine in the next 10 to 15 years if pop up restaurant will become a new permanent venue. This study provides information for professionals and people entering the restaurant industry for potential job opportunities. Pop ups are a style of restaurant that takes over a venue for a short period of time (48 hours to a week). This research is based on professional willingness to enter the pop up industry and research measuring consumer knowledge of pop ups and future demand. Research is based on surveys filled out by the general population, and surveys to restaurant professionals.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Capstone.doc
Authors: De Anna Wasiewski

Perception Connection - Defining Local Food, and the Gap Between Chefs and Consumers

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 11:01
Abstract: With increasing numbers of restaurants using the word “local” on their menus, and consumers seeking out farmers markets and purveyors who label their products as local, it has become necessary to take a closer look at just what is being talked about. When a chef puts the word local next to his featured dish of the day, what does that mean to him? Conversely, what does a customer reading that menu expect to be getting on their plate? Currently, there are no government regulations for the use of the “local” description, unlike “organic” and “all-natural” foods. Since there are no legal expectations, it is at the discretion of the chefs to decide how they will market certain items, and in the minds of the consumers what they expect to be consuming based upon an image. This capstone will explore, through the use of surveys, distributed to both culinary professionals, and culinary consumers, what their expectations of a locally sourced food item are. The results of these queries will demonstrate whether there is a gap between the two facets. The project does not seek to establish a basis for regulation, but rather to explore the ideals of two symbiotic groups. The conclusions based upon what this project discovers will educate both chefs and consumers on commonly accepted standards in local food. It will also offer them the opportunity to evaluate any gaps between standards, and decide how they might approach using or buying “local” food. 
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Capstone project.docx
Authors: Kelcey Rusch

Cornopoly A Study of a Cost Effective and Corn-free Menu

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 11:50
Abstract: In the past ten years the price of corn has quadrupled as the result of the increasing demand for corn. Today, there are wide ranges of items being produced that include corn as an essential ingredient. This project looked into developing ways to help food service establishments to remain cost effective despite the increased price of corn and thus corn derived products. For this project we held a blind taste test meal to find consumer preference. During the meal we supplied questionnaires to collect data on preferences. We found that the price of corn had not reached a high enough point to force a change to non-corn derived products; however, we felt that through statistical forecasting, the price of corn would rise to a point that would not allow restaurants to remain cost effective.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Final Capstone Paper.doc
Authors: Jeffrey Dineen, Matthew Cusimano

Self-Actualization through the use of food

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 12:19
Abstract: Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs is a table consisting of human needs according to necessity; in order to reach a new level, needs of the previous level must be met first. Among the physiological needs located at the bottom of the pyramid, is food. Food can be controlled unlike other biological needs and therefore may play a crucial role in reaching the ultimate goal of self-actualization. The purpose of this capstone is to show how food can go beyond the need of hunger, and bring us to a self-actualizing moment. The surveys will be conducted to gather statistics and opinions of outdoor recreationists and other relevant professionals such as chefs and culinary students. The question that is going to be answered through this capstone is: Is food preparation and consumption an enriching and exciting enough experience to achieve self-actualization? The results should vary between the two populations, but the ultimate prediction is that food will be shown to be a major factor in the achievement of self-actualization. The significance of this study is to reach a new level of understanding about the importance of food to the human body, and show that food can bring that self-actualizing moment without meeting all the other needs of the pyramid beforehand.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Stephanie Curtis