After logging in with the login link in the top right, click here to upload your Capstone

Capstone Projects

Analysis of Forage Quality in Adirondack Macrophytes: Implications for Waterfowl Nutrition

Fri, 04/29/2016 - 14:48
Abstract: To understand the relative nutritional value of macrophyte food sources for Adirondack waterfowl, the forage quality of four common Adirondack macrophytes were assessed. An analysis of two native pondweeds (Potamogeton) and two invasive watermilfoil (Myriophyllum) was conducted to deduce how invasive and native macrophytes compare in their relative concentrations of nitrogen and mineral content; important indicators of forage quality for waterfowl. Nitrogen content is used as a metric for relative concentration of protein. Macrophyte species were sampled from four Adirondack lakes of the same trophic status to account for effects of lake nutrient characteristics on plant nutrient uptake and synthesis. Total nitrogen was determined with the Kjeldahl procedure using flow injection analysis. Ash (mineral) content was acquired through high-heat burning in a muffle furnace. The invasive watermilfoil species had a higher percentage of nitrogen than the native species. There was no significant difference in the ash content between the species. It is critical to understand the ecological function of these species in relation to wildlife populations. The nutritional value of these aquatic macrophytes may have implications for the fitness and distribution of breeding herbivorous waterfowl in Adirondack lakes. These results may indicate that invasive plants will serve as a viable food source for herbivorous waterfowl as watermilfoil continues to spread across Adirondack aquatic systems.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2016
Authors: Bianca Fournier

Walden Pond: Ecological and Anthropological History Reflected in the Sedimentary Record

Tue, 05/03/2016 - 23:13
Abstract: This study examined environmental changes reflected in the microfossil record of a sediment core taken in August 2015 from Walden Pond, Massachusetts spanning the last 600 years. In particular changes in the eutrophication status, inorganic sediment deposition due to land use, lake water depth and temperature were examined using phytoplankton indicator species—diatoms and chrysophytes— to reconstruct environmental conditions. The study site was a basin shallower and closer to the source of anthropogenic N and P inputs than the site of previous studies at Walden’s deepest basin, allowing for finer detection of changes in water level and organic content of sediment. A gravity corer was used to collect the sediment core to preserve topmost sediment layers for analysis, as more than a decade has passed since the last published study of this kind at Walden Pond by Köster et. al. (2005). Results show a significant increase in indicators of eutrophic lake conditions since European settlement ca. 1630, and especially since the 20th century. However, relative Asterionella formosa and Synedra nana abundances had not changed significantly in the last decade since Köster et. al.’s 2005 study, and have in fact decreased somewhat, suggesting water treatment efforts by the Massachusetts Dept. of Environmental Protection (DEP) have had some success. Loss on ignition (LOI) of organic content shows a precipitous decline from the mid 19th century from 37% to 22%, representing intensive land clearance and development until the 1970’s when DEP management began. After that point, LOI rose, perhaps due to increased lake productivity, and has fluctuated around 25%. Relative Discostella stelligera abundance, while used in the WAl-3 piston core as a proxy for water depth, could not be used in the WAL-1 gravity core from this study as eutrophication has significantly impacted their abundance. Chrysophyte scale:diatom ratios corroborate an observed trend of increasing abundance in lakes globally since the 20th century, perhaps in response to rising global temperatures over the same period.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2016
File Attachments: Capstone Paper.docx
Authors: Erik Yankowsky

Rooted Education: learning from aquaponics

Sat, 04/30/2016 - 15:02
Abstract: Aquaponics is the integration of soil-less agriculture (hydroponics) within closed-loop aquaculture systems to reduce the toxic accumulation of nutrient waste from aquatic animals. Bacteria naturally establish to purify water by oxidizing the ammonia secreted by fish, which reduces the toxicity of effluent while creating a usable nitrogen source for plants. The conversion of ammonia and nitrite into nitrate by living bacteria communities is called a biological filter, or biofiltration (FAO 2014). Aquaponics would not be possible without biofiltration; the slightest amount of ammonia would be fatally toxic to fish, and plants wouldn't receive the nitrates they need to grow. There are unique opportunities offered by an aquaponics system to learn about ecological and human communities. 1.1. Aquaponics enables users to grow fish and agricultural plants with limited space and resource use (water, soil, and time). This enables an aquaponics user to invest less physical energy and time into expanding sustainable food resources for their household use. 1.2. A small aquaponics system could promote cultural values of self-sufficiency, energy consciousness, and connection to food systems. It could inspire individual efforts to produce food for one’s household, to build healthier and more resilient systems, and a greater appreciation for farming. Therefore, this project aims to actualize a mobile and functional aquaponics system for the educational benefit of the Paul Smith's College community. I will provide the background knowledge needed to maintain an aquaponics system, as well as describe the general concept of aquaponics design.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Environmental Sciences, Natural Resources Sustainability Studies
Year: 2016
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Brian Jason Kohan

Guest Retention due to Value-Added Services within Resorts: A study of the relationship between value added services and guest loyalty in both large and small resorts

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 00:52
Abstract: The resort market is currently an industry of service, rather than simply selling rooms as it was in the past. The concept of a value-added service during a stay in a resort rather than a tangible room is now very important to an individual guest. The purpose of this project is to find out if value-added services make or break the potential for a first time guest to become a return guest. Also, the study shows if these value-added services contribute to customer loyalty. The methods used show the link between a value-added stay and return guests of both small boutique hotels and larger resorts. This data was collected through the form of interviews of front office managers of these types of resorts. The significance of this project will aid hoteliers in both small and larger resorts in deciding the type of service provided by their employees. It will also show them what additional services not already put in place they may want to implement to further guarantee repeat guest business.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Ashley Booton

How are hotels responding to the increase in demand for pure/ hypoallergenic rooms?

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 10:05
Abstract: Americans today have become more and more aware of the germs that are around them. The television advertisements have influenced the idea that there are a lot of germs that people need to be aware of. For example, there is a hazmat advertisement for Hampton Inn that shows a woman being afraid to climb into bed. A housekeeper then comes into the room, in a hazmat suit to take apart the bed stating that Hampton Inn always washes their sheets and duvets, implying that other hotels may not. The purpose of this project is to determine how hotels are responding to the increase in demand for hypoallergenic/pure rooms. The general managers of chain hotels in the northeast will be surveyed. This information will then provide results of how the hotels plan to accommodate these travelers. This will also help determine if the demand for pure rooms will increase the supply of pure rooms. This information can be used by hotel chains to improve their customer expectations of the hotel as well as meet the needs and wants of their travelers.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Capstone Final Paper.docx
Authors: Ashlee Lansing

Wine Applications in Restaurants

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 16:19
Abstract: Research and studies have revealed that wine applications (apps) have an impact on the way wine consumers purchase wine at a restaurant and the way hospitality professionals sell wine at their property. The purpose of this study was to find out how many wine consumers are using wine apps as well as to determine how they are using them. The study then looked at how trend-setting hospitality professionals have adapted their wine selling techniques to assist the wine consumers in their wine selection. The information for this project was obtained through a survey of wine consumers as well as survey of the individual(s) who is in charge of wine sales at the restaurants being surveyed. The results of this study will determine if restaurants should allow and encourage the use of wine apps in their establishment to increase wine sales. Therefore, the results of this study can benefit restaurant properties uncertain if their establishment will be affected by wine apps and are unsure how they should react to the new technology that is offered to wine enthusiasts.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Shelby Stetson

Bringing Families Back to the Drive-In

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 17:55
Abstract: Drive-in theaters have been in existence since 1933. However, within the past 30 years the number has been declining. Now there are indications that they have been making a comeback. The number of operating drive-in theaters went from 366 in 2011 to 368 this year according to drive-ins.com. This study seeks to determine how drive-in theater can appeal to families, and how they may best cultivate their comeback. The opinions of both families and drive-in theater owners will be gathered through the use of surveys. The results will be used to determine what steps drive-in theater owners will take to attract more families back to the drive-in theater also what features families would want available at the drive-in theater. The long term goal is help the family become a unit.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Eric Kowalik

Micro-distilling; More than Moonshining: Can micro-distilling be an integral part of sustainable Adirondack agriculture?

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 20:43
Abstract: In order for residents of the Adirondacks to make a living, there needs to be a change in the agriculture, as in what happens to the products that are grown and often not used. There are many products that are not used at the end of the harvest season simply because the farmer cannot use that many products. The most obvious would be going to apple orchards where they have so much waste because of drop apples and apples not picked, and turning the apples into a Brandy. The purpose of this Capstone is to determine if there will be enough surplus products from apple orchards, potato farms, and sugar houses that make maple syrup, to be turned into a liquor rather than being thrown away and wasted. The way that the data is going to be collected may seem a bit unconventional in that a large group of people will not be surveyed but rather a small group of business owners including, Randy Galusha of Toad Hill Maple Farm, in Thurman, NY, Steve Tucker of Tucker Farms Inc. in Gabriels, NY, and a member from Hicks apple orchard in Granville, NY. Others that will be asked are Harry Gorham the head distiller at Vermont Spirits in Quechee, VT and a member of Laird & Company in Scobeyville, NJ, these are people that are educated on the subject and can provide extra input on the matter at hand. The results of asking the business owner will determine if from an agricultural point of view, there a surplus of potatoes, maple syrup, and apples to turn them into Vodkas and a Brandy (respectively). The products that are left over could be turned into a spirit, it is hard to tell how much is going to be sold, because it would depend how much was left over. The result will also show if it is going to be economically feasible to do so, or if farms will have to be set up to produce goods strictly to make a spirit. This information can be used by spirit aficionados, who may be looking to taste a product that not every spirit connoisseur can obtain. It can also be used by those who may be looking for an alternate solution to the economy. The liquor can be sold in liquor stores in the area that they were made, for example liquor that is made in Saranac Lake should be sold in Saranac Lake or Lake Placid liquor stores. This would add an extra income for the farms.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Final.docx
Authors: Lacey Galusha

From House to Home

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 20:59
Abstract: In 2011, baby boomers began reaching the age of retirement; a trend that will continue for the next twenty years. This generation is healthier, wealthier, and more educated than their predecessors, which presents an opportunity for the assisted living industry. Assisted living facilities offer more independence and fewer restrictions than nursing homes which is appealing to those who only need help completing daily tasks. The Adirondacks have potential to play a significant role as a retirement destination. The purpose of this study is to determine what brought baby boomers to assisted living facilities in the Adirondacks. Semi-structured surveys will be used to obtain the needed information. This information will ultimately help assisted living facilities in the Adirondack region market to future baby boomers.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: House to Home.doc
Authors: Mallory Kasey Fleishman

Quick Key

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 09:23
Abstract: Various forms of technologies are used to check in and out of hotels. The purpose of this research is to determine if high technology supported properties differ from traditional properties in terms of roles and responsibilities for front of the house personnel for managers of business properties. The study will explore how and to what extent new automated processes at hotels affect the roles and responsibilities for front of the house personnel and if different skills are needed between properties that use traditional and automated procedures. Due to the exploratory nature of the study qualitative methods will be used, using the high technology property chain, Club Quarters. The method that will be used is both an electronic survey and telephonic interview, having multiple front office managers at different Club Quarters sites fill out a questionnaire with both multiple choice and open ended questions; and answer questions from a telephonic interview regarding the roles and responsibilities of front house personnel. The data that will be collected from the front of the house management will be used to conclude if the data collected shows that the roles and responsibilities of front of the house personnel differs from traditional to high technology; and if additional training requirements are needed. The results of the research will be shared with participants as informational only. Data will be collected from multiple properties, using various Club Quarters sites from inn the United States. Focus areas of information will be captured by asking specific questions of management that will include background of hotel, job descriptions, and training requirements. Front end management was chosen to fill out the surveys as they have the day to day oversight and will be able to answer the questions honestly and have the knowledge to do so.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Robert Van de Wal