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Capstone Projects

The Egg

Wed, 12/14/2016 - 11:10
Abstract: In this capstone we researched the egg. We explored the different components that make up the egg, the different vitamins, minerals and proteins that are found in an egg and the grading process that they go through. We talk about the history and where eggs in fact came from and how they came to be so commonly used, as well as their baking and cooking applications.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management, Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2016
Authors: Lora Semple , Justin Tinelli

Salt

Wed, 12/14/2016 - 12:54
Abstract: For our capstone project we got the ingredient salt. There is a lot about salt that most people do not realize and so within this paper we want to let you know what we learned about salt. That includes the history of it, the many different types of salt and where they come from and also how they are used in culinary and baking. We also included in the paper how we used the ingredient throughout our five course meal. Some salts even have other uses that do not relate to cooking or baking and are still explained throughout the paper.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management, Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2016
Authors: Ryan Quinn, Jenny Mcginn

Home Grown Kitchen - A study of how easy or difficult it is to use Farm-to-Table for a large catering event in the Adirondack's in the spring season with baking and pastry applications

Fri, 05/06/2016 - 17:00
Abstract: Cassie Brown and I catered the Boomerang alumni networking event on campus on April 7th. Our capstone questions was “how easy or difficult is it to cater an event in the Adirondacks in the springtime using Farm-to-Table with baking and pastry applications.” We learned that it is difficult, but not by any means impossible. Catering is something that Cassie and I are both interested in so this topic was perfect for us. Cassis and I were able to help connect local farmers with local customers, raise Farm-to-Table awareness, meet and interact with alumni, and show the Paul Smith’s College community our skills and what we have learned throughout our four years here at Paul Smith’s College.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2016
Authors: Victoria Gregory

Home Grown Kitchen: Catering Boomerang

Fri, 05/06/2016 - 17:11
Abstract: Home Grown Kitchen is a baking capstone project that is focused around farm-to-table and the Adirondack cuisine. The Adirondack cuisine has a prominent focus on farm-to-table, and we wanted to incorporate that into catering the Boomerang event. Boomerang is an event that is held on campus to network future graduates of Paul Smith’s College with alumni. Farm-to-table seemed to be appropriate for alumni coming back into the Adirondack park. By using local farms and vendors we were able to create a solid menu that would be appealing to everyone, and easily eaten while mingling with students and alumni. The main question is whether farm-to-table in the Adirondacks is easy or difficult, while using baking applications. By contacting local vendors, researching what grows during the seasons, and having conversations with chefs on campus to help us along the way, Boomerang had becoming a successful event to cater.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2016
File Attachments: Catering Boomerang
Authors: Cassie Brown

A Study of Pure and Artificial Maple Syrup Production

Sun, 05/08/2016 - 22:40
Abstract: Many people claim that they can tell the difference between pure and artificial maple syrup. However, pure and artificial maple syrup are made through two completely different processes. Through the method of a blind taste test, I want to answer the question whether or not consumers can in fact tell the difference between pure and artificial maple syrup when both served as is or baked into products through a catered breakfast. At the catered breakfast the following dishes were served: maple glazed doughnuts, breakfast casserole, sausage gravy and biscuits, pancakes with maple butter and maple syrup, vanilla and maple yogurt, and sliced fruit. There were two options to choose from for the maple glazed doughnuts, maple butter, maple syrup, and maple yogurts. One choice was made with pure maple syrup, the second choice was made with artificial maple syrup; the consumers did not know which option was made with which maple syrup. At the end of the breakfast, I asked each guest to complete a survey that would let me know which option they believed to be made with the pure maple syrup and which option they believed to be made with the artificial maple syrup.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2016
File Attachments: Final Written Paper.pdf
Authors: Amanda Gail Wetter

Do consumers prefer American ice cream opposed to international ice cream?

Thu, 05/12/2016 - 18:10
Abstract: Do people tend to pick American flavors of ice cream or international flavors of ice cream? I did a study trying to answer this question. I used a survey to develop results and learn information about ice cream and other frozen desserts. By making ice cream from different countries, I was able to answer my questions. Through research and holding an event, I retained information to tell me if consumers prefer American or international flavors of ice cream.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2016
File Attachments: Capstone paper.doc
Authors: Abigail Pinault

Global Cuisine; Italy

Outward Bound semester: Skills to last a life time

Wed, 12/14/2016 - 10:44
Abstract: The focus of this study will examine the level at which an Outward Bound semester fosters personal growth, connection with nature, and hard skills. This particular Outward Bound semester course traveled from the Florida Keys then on to Costa Rica and Panama in Central America. The course focused on the water elements of sailing, surfing, whitewater rafting, scuba diving, and sea kayaking. Methods used include personal journal reflections, peer and instructors oral and written responses. The researcher was an active participant in the immersive experience and kept a journal of the entire experience trying to gather as much information about the course itself and reflecting on the research process throughout. This research indicated that this experience developed personal character and a connection with nature. These skills have an impact deeper than an isolated course with Outward Bound but can be transferred to daily life.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism, Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management, Parks, Recreation and Facilities Management
Year: 2016
Authors: Sam Annable

Food Allergies, Dietary Restrictions, and the Foodservice Industry

Thu, 12/03/2015 - 22:59
Abstract: For modern culinary professionals, food allergies and restricted diets present one of the biggest challenges in daily work. Ranging from an anaphylaxis-triggering peanut allergy to a preference for avoiding meat on Fridays, dietary restrictions and food sensitivities cover a wide variety of potential hurdles, and potentially inspirational guidelines, which foodservice professionals must navigate in order to be successful. On one side, a rise in the number of those with allergies or dietary restrictions presents an added challenge, but on the other, it presents an opportunity. Diners with such restrictions are becoming more and more comfortable with going out to dinner; that there will be some accommodation is now expected by consumers, rather than hoped for. The definition of “food allergy,” according to the Mayo Clinic, is “an immune system reaction that occurs soon after eating a certain food.” However, according to many experienced foodservice workers, the definition is “an annoying request from a customer who’s probably lying, anyway.” Of the many challenges contemporary chefs, culinarians, and food service professionals face, food preparation and service for those with allergies and restricted diets is one of the most prevalent, as well as one of the most misunderstood. Foodservice professionals will tell you that some of the most [annoying, silly, overblown, difficult, frightening] requests they receive while working are for special adjustments to accommodate a food allergy. When a chef is asked if the signature pasta dish can be made without gluten, his reaction is too often a mix of ire, disgust, and even embarrassment. Should a patron make a simple request that his or her food be prepared away from peanuts, images of anaphylactic shock and ambulances in the parking lot dance demonically through the front-of-house manager’s head. Such requests, however, seem to be popping up more and more often in our world. According to the CDC, “The prevalence of food allergies among children increased 18% during 1997-2007.” About 15 million Americans suffer from food allergies, as well as about 18 million Europeans. With such a rapid increase in those numbers, one would think the opportunity to impress customers with special diets might make a chef happy, rather than feeling as though he has been offended. The patience of chefs grows thinner still, however, when such requests are not a matter of health, but a matter of preference. For those who, for various reasons, adhere to a vegetarian or plant-based diet, or who follow certain religious dietary restrictions such as Islamic Halaal, finding a restaurant where the staff is ready and willing to accommodate can sometimes be difficult. For contemporary food handlers, ethics and morality play a massive role in serving such customers. A vegetarian diner, for example, may not know that the house minestrone soup is made with chicken stock in place of vegetable stock. Even after eating the soup, that customer will likely never know. In such situations, the decision to serve certain foods comes down to how much respect for his or her customers a chef has. It is my belief that the largest contributing factor towards the negative feelings chefs harbor over dietary restrictions is a lack of education and experience in handling such requests. Things unknown have always been a source of anxiety for a majority of human kind. That anxiety is why we are explorers and innovators; we subconsciously want to make things known. In order for foodservice professionals to handle the large number of diners who now request special items, it is necessary that they be educated from the earliest stages of their careers to expect, to accept, to interpret, and to enjoy working with those types of challenges. By doing so, the food and beverage industry will be a much more friendly world for all consumers, and a much more profitable one for all industry professionals.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Nathaniel Swain

Cheese

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 17:05
Abstract: This culminating experience happens in two phases. Throughout the semester, students have been taking on the role of Executive Chef in our Palm Restaurant. They have each created a menu, ordered food supplies, developed budgetary proposal, and assigned duties pertaining to food production and front of house service. Each dinner took on a different food related theme that the students researched and developed. This poster session provides the students to describe their process, their findings, and what they learned from the experience. My theme was based on cheese.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Lisa McCartney