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Capstone Projects

Barley Believable Bakery and Cafe

Fri, 04/29/2022 - 18:14
Abstract: For my capstone project I created a complete business plan for a specialty diet bakery and cafe. Barley Believable is located in Tucson Arizona right off of highway 10. It's menu is traditional baked goods, desserts, cafe food and drinks. The twist is that everything is gluten and peanut free. During my week in the PSC bakery I showcased three signature items, chocolate chunk cookies, chocolate coconut cake, and apple streusel bread.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2022
Authors: Elsa Barber

Wiliam Kluge Hungry Boy Cafe & Catering

Fri, 04/29/2022 - 11:10
Abstract: This capstone was creating a business plan for a cafe/catering company that will hope to open in the future. I created a business plan with an organizational structure, menu, a marketing plan, and more all culminating in this business creation. I also had the opportunity to serve some of my items in the campus bakery to get the feedback of my peers to improve them for the future.
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Literary Rights: Off
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2022
Authors: William Kluge

H & W Delights

Wed, 04/27/2022 - 12:35
Abstract: This capstone was creating a business plan for a future bakery/cafe owned by my friend Hadeel and I. I created a business plan, an organizational structure, a menu, a marketing plan, and more. I even had the chance to allow the Paul Smith's community to try my signature items out of the A.P. Smith's Bakery.
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Literary Rights: Off
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2022
File Attachments: Widnie S22 Capstone.pdf
Authors: Widnie Dorilas

Twenty-Year Northern Hawk Owl (Surnia ulula) Management Plan for the State of Montana

Mon, 04/25/2022 - 16:41
Abstract: Northern Hawk Owls (Surnia ulula) are a Holarctic species found primarily in the northern latitudes. This diurnal species is dependent upon boreal forests that experience either occasional clear cuts or natural forest fires. Northern Hawk Owls are also found in remote areas and difficult habitat which makes it difficult to study and observe. This is the main reason why Northern Hawk Owls are one of the least studied species of owls across the world. Recently, as of 1994, a breeding population has been detected in the state of Montana, particularly the western region closest to Glacier National Park. This breeding population, estimated to be about 36 breeding pairs, has resulted in Northern Hawk Owls being listed as a “species of concern” however there is no management plan for the owls. This management plan seeks to target the main factors that are affecting these owls including forestry operations, human influence, and even climatic changes in the near future. This management plan aims to increase adult Northern Hawk Owl populations in the next 20 years. Objectives to reach this goal include better research on the population in Montana currently, as well as decrease forestry operations in Northern Hawk Owl habitat. Because there is a limited amount of data on Northern Hawk Owls, especially in Montana, it is key to implement research on the species to gather more data. Observing issues such as breeding and nesting grounds, response to small mammal populations, and overall biology is important to understand for this plan to be successful. One objective to combat declining breeding habitat is working with logging and forestry companies to educate workers on the importance of keeping clear cuts under 100ha in areas where there are known breeding hawk owls. Prescribed burns could also be another way to increase Northern Hawk Owl presence. By burning selected areas, it can increase vegetation and have positive impacts on the small mammal population. Another important objective to this plan is working with Native American tribal landowners on this management plan. Since the Montana state government has little to no jurisdiction over private tribal land, it is important to work with the Native American tribal community and create a relationship with private landowners. This is a key step to determining where exactly Northern Hawk Owls are nesting in the state. In order to reach the general public about these issues, educational posters will be displayed around National Park areas in Montana state. Surveys will also be given out in a variety of ways including Q-R codes at rest areas and hiking trailheads. This survey will determine how involved and educated the general public is about Northern Hawk Owls and the conservation of the species. This species is uncommon, but with the implementation of these objectives and actions in this management plan, greater awareness can be brought about to help the conservation of Northern Hawk Owls in Montana.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2022
File Attachments: Brogan_26April2022_0.docx
Authors: Lindsay A. Brogan

Ten-Year Peaks of Otter Salamander (Plethodon hubrichti) Management Plan for Virginia

Mon, 04/25/2022 - 20:16
Abstract: The Peaks of Otter salamander (Plethodon hubrichti) is a native Virginian salamander with a small range of only 〖19km〗^2 in Virginia. There is little known about P.hubrichti but it is a species of concern in Virginia and is also an IUCN vulnerable species. Conservation concerns include timbering, and the threat of amphibian diseases. This management plan aims to maintain and increase the P.hubrichti population. The main goals are to maintain and increase the current population, and to understand the ecology of the species. For this to be accomplished, a long term study will be put into place to get accurate population estimates and survival rates. Also, the timbering may continue but will be closely monitored and only shelterwood cuts will be allowed within the P.hubrichti range. Additionally, education on amphibian diseases will be activated within the park. With the use of these actions, we can learn more about P.hubrichti and ensure this species' future.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2022
Authors: Yelena Jaquith

25 Year Bengal Fox (Vulpes bengalensis) Management Plan for Karnataka, India

Tue, 04/26/2022 - 11:18
Abstract: Bengal foxes (Vulpes bengalensis) are a small canid endemic to India and adjacent regions. They are opportunistic omnivores, consuming a wide variety of food-items which may vary in abundance seasonally and/or spatially. Conservation issues of primary concern include habitat loss, habitat degradation, poaching, and outbreaks of enzootic diseases. Space needed to accommodate the growing human population as well as increases in agricultural and industrial output has led to encroachment of humans onto Bengal fox habitat. This management plan aims to increase Bengal fox populations within Karnataka, India to ~10,000 individuals to allow grazing and development practices to continue. Objectives to reach this goal include estimating and mapping habitat suitability in Karnataka, performing a mark-recapture study to gain information on population dynamics, providing public education on Bengal fox conservation to residents and ecotourists, and increasing the survivorship of pup and juvenile age classes. To estimate habitat suitability, vegetation will need to be surveyed throughout Karnataka using a series of randomly generated plots. Measurements of habitat suitability will be compiled in a map utilizing ArcGIS which will help locate areas with potentially high Bengal fox densities. A mark-recapture study will be executed to gain knowledge on survivorship of the Bengal fox population in Karnataka. A Cormack-Jolly-Seber Model will be utilized to interpret survivorship of the Bengal fox population following the mark-recapture study. Data on current Bengal fox population dynamics is lacking from the literature and is necessary for the needs of this management plan as well as future studies on Bengal foxes. Public education of Bengal fox conservation will take place in public schools and various ecotourist destinations to help identify uncertainties and biases in knowledge. The distribution of surveys will evaluate public awareness and perceptions of Bengal fox conservation needs in Karnataka after public education initiatives have been implemented for multiple years. Community support and involvement will be crucial in minimizing poaching events and overgrazing of Karnataka’s grasslands. Survivorship of pup and juvenile age classes will be increased through the restoration of habitat, discontinuation of overgrazing, and declaration of Karnataka as a “Closed Area”. Local communities will qualify for incentives gained from revenues of localized protected areas to discontinue harmful grazing practices and allow habitat restoration to occur on their lands. By declaring Karnataka, a “Closed Area”, hunting of local wildlife species would be banned but development projects and overgrazing practices could continue. Therefore, public support of this management plan must be gained for conservation to be successful. Implementation of this management plan will potentially raise the Bengal fox population of Karnataka, India to ~10,000 individuals for the benefit of their ecosystem and the local ecotourism industry.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2022
Authors: Damon M. Emerson

20 Year Management Plan of Snake River Finespotted Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii behnkei) in Southeastern Idaho

Tue, 04/26/2022 - 21:05
Abstract: Snake River Finespotted Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii behnkei) is a freshwater trout species native to the upper Snake River and its tributaries between the states of Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana. This species is recognizable by its fine hair-like spots delicately speckling its entire body, and often have distinctively rosy colored gill plates which characterize its name, “cutthroat”. Similar to many salmonid species, cutthroat face many challenges with reproducing due to predatory competition within spawning season. Larger, more dominant fish such as Brown Trout (Salmo trutta), and Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are known to often prey on active Cutthroat redds for an easy opportunity for a meal. With 0.03% of Cutthroat Trout eggs having the chance to survive to become parr, the risk of predatory species eliminating a large portion of these eggs is becoming increasingly more and more important to manage. These predators continue to be introduced and stocked into more native Cutthroat Trout waters, which is not allowing this species of concern to thrive or reproduce in greater numbers on their own. Aside from predators in the water, all trout species are currently facing the detrimental effects of climate change, which are impacting waterways worldwide and most especially cold-water fisheries. With rising risks of drought, forest fires, low water levels and high water temperatures, Cutthroat Trout are in urgent need of proper management. To increase the opportunity for Snake River Finespotted Cutthroat Trout to abundantly reproduce, a 20-year management plan studying best fit practices for conserving Cutthroat Trout eggs within redds will be introduced. This study will assess how to protect the redds safely and effectively without harming the amount of oxygen the eggs will be receiving and keeping predators away from the redds without causing damage to other microhabitats within the streams. Education will also be a large component of this management plan, aiming to increase public knowledge and awareness of ethical catch and release practices of anglers, and maintaining ethical decisions while fishing highly trafficked fishing locations during summer months. For a species already suffering from lack of reproduction and struggling with the outcome on streams from climate change, pressure from fishing tourism is a large variable that is crucial to properly manage. With the implementation of extended research on protecting redds, increased public education events on trout conservation, and improved knowledge to fishermen on ethical fishing practices in order to keep this trophy species healthy, the future for Snake River Finespotted Cutthroat Trout has potential to improve significantly.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2022
File Attachments: DiMeolo_Capstone22.pdf
Authors: Dinah K. DiMeolo

Fifteen Year Mangrove Hummingbird (Amazilia boucardi) Management Plan for Western Costa Rica

Mon, 04/25/2022 - 22:45
Abstract: The mangrove hummingbird (Amazilia boucardi) is a species of hummingbird that is endemic to Costa Rica. With an estimated current population of 2,500 – 10,000 individuals total, and rapidly declining being considered there is a strong need for conservation of this species. Mangrove hummingbirds only utilize a section of Pacific Mangrove habitat on the western coast of Costa Rica which is in danger of being affected by illegal logging practices. Currently, this species will likely be extinct within the next 15 years as illegal forestry practices and habitat destruction cause a lack of viable habitat for this species to persist in. While Costa Rica has already created some rigorous laws to help prevent and discourage habitat destruction, there has still been a decrease in mangrove habitat which is causing the decrease in the hummingbird’s population leading to an Endangered classification according to the IUCN, and a general lack of information on this species. The mangrove hummingbird utilizes mangrove habitats exclusively on the west coast of Costa Rica, and rarely leaves them except for feeding occasionally, but have never been found more than 200m from the edge of the habitat. Mangrove hummingbirds feed primarily on Heliconia sp., Hamelia sp., Inga sp., Roble de Sabana (Tabebuia rosea), and Maripa nicaraquensis which are native to mangrove habitats. When looking at what comes next for the management of this species, this plans two major goals are to understand the population ecology and population dynamics of the mangrove hummingbird, as well as to protect and maintain the existing suitable habitat in Costa Rica to ensure the further growth to reach a sustainable population. To achieve this, I have four major objectives which will help reach these goals. First, this plan aims to estimate the population size, fecundity, and mortality rates of mature individuals, along with survival rates as well. Second, we will confirm the locations of existing populations on the Pacific Coast of Costa Rica to ensure correct locations for further management. Third, we will work to conserve the existing suitable habitat to maintain and hopefully increase the overall survival rates throughout the population. Lastly, we will increase the public awareness of this species, as well as the illegal logging practices throughout the mangrove hummingbird range by 50% and set up the groundwork to increase wages for logging workers to reduce bribery. Ultimately, the creation and implementation of this management plan will be beneficial for gaining information on the species which can be further used to protect this species directly in the future. Through implementation of the actions in this plan, I am looking to see an increase in education by 50% as well as an increase in survivorship percentages from about 5% in after hatch year individuals to at least 55% survival, which would ensure the increase in population size. This would be possible from maintaining the current estimated 41,000 hectares of mangroves in Costa Rica, with no more than a 5% decrease in number of hectares overall.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2022
Authors: Alexander S. Caporale

Forty-year Rüppell’s Griffon Vulture (Gyps rueppelli) Management Plan for the W-Arli-Pendjari Park Complex, Africa

Tue, 04/26/2022 - 03:47
Abstract: Ruppell’s Vulture (Gyps rueppelli) is a large African vulture species native to the Sahel and savannah regions of Africa. They are obligate carrion feeders, soaring above the savannah using their keen eyesight to locate carcasses. African vultures have long been overlooked for conversation and research which has led to a critical lack of knowledge on their ecology and conservation concerns. They, along with most other African vulture species have experienced extreme population declines with Ruppell’s Vulture having lost approximately 92.5% of their population between 1970 and 2004. The cause of population declines varies depending on the region in question. In Central and West Africa, their populations are heavily pressured by climate change, accidental poisonings from predator control and veterinary drugs in livestock and intentional poisoning to harvest the birds for the bushmeat/traditional medicine trade. The primary goals of this management plan are to address knowledge gaps surrounding Ruppell’s Vulture’s natural history, ecology, and causes for decline, as well as increasing the Ruppell’s vulture population by pressuring the governments of Benin, Burkina Faso, and Niger to regulate the availability and use of known vulture-toxic substances to mitigate the poisoning of Vultures in the region. To address information gaps, this management plan will conduct a 39-year long-term monitoring study of the population size, survivorship, mortality, causes of mortality, habitat use, fecundity, and rate of exposure to toxic substances for the Ruppell’s Vulture population within the W-Arli Pendjari Park Complex. Furthermore, surveys will be sent to farmers, veterinary services, and agricultural suppliers every ten years (i.e. 2032, 2042, 2052, 2062) in the region surrounding the WAP Complex to monitor the source, prevalence, and use of vulture-toxic substances over the course of the management plan. In addition to modeling their natural history, ecology, and causes of their decline, this information will be used to monitor the overall success of the policy changes as they are implemented. The results from the long-term monitoring program and the surveys will be published as peer-reviewed articles every ten years after implementation (i.e. 2032, 2042, 2052, 2062) for the dissemination of information pertinent to the conservation of the Ruppell’s Vulture and other African vultures.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2022
Authors: Kevin J. Dernier

5 Year Management Plan for Introduced Common Mudpuppies (Necturus maculosus) in Maine

Tue, 04/26/2022 - 10:13
Abstract: In 1939 and 1940, 85 live specimens of common mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus) salamanders escaped from cages suspended in the stream running between Salmon Lake (Ellis Pond), and Great Pond in Maine. These original escapees were laboratory specimens collected in Pennsylvania by Professor Aplington of Colby college. Descendants of those common mudpuppies have since established and proliferated in the Belgrade chain of lakes. Common mudpuppies are native to the American Midwest, the Great Lakes Drainage, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, and New England drainages leading to Lake Champlain. Common mudpuppy ranges extend south into Louisiana to Georgia. Common mudpuppies feed on shellfish, eggs, and small fish, and are forage most actively during the winter. Ecological interactions between common mudpuppies and prey species are not understood, and common predator species remain largely unknown, although there are sparse observational reports in literature. This plan will create a monitoring system to keep track of common mudpuppy populations and where the invasive range has spread to. Consistent monitoring through trapping and observation in the immediate future, while simultaneously developing eDNA surveys to detect common mudpuppies, will create a fuller picture of the status of invasive common mudpuppies. Monitoring can inform future management decisions and pinpoint areas where efforts should be focused. Public education efforts can focus on ponds hosting common mudpuppies by posting flyers there. Research on the ecological interactions of common mudpuppies with Maine SGCN species and important game fish species such as brown trout (Salmo trutta) and smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu). Once these interactions become more clear future management plans can take these into account for their goals and objectives. If successful, these efforts will increase awareness of common mudpuppies and minimize anthropogenic causes of their spread. A scientific understanding of environmental effects stemming from common mudpuppy presence will inform the dangers posed to native wildlife by common mudpuppies, if any, and what level investment is justified by their impact can be judged off the results. Ideally, common mudpuppies will no longer be existing as an unquantified factor in the ecology of Maine’s lakes and streams.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2022
File Attachments: CommonMudpuppy_Fogarty.pdf
Authors: Jack Fogarty