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Capstone Projects

The Conservation and Management of Wolverine (Gulo gulo) Populations in Northern Idaho to Help Prevent Human Caused Extirpation from the Contiguous United States

Thu, 05/02/2013 - 11:21
Abstract: Wolverines (Gulo gulo) were once a thriving species in the North Western United States, but large scale trapping and poison programs in the early 1900s lead to the species near extinction. Since then, populations in the United States have been struggling to maintain a strong presence in Idaho. Its current listing as threatened on the Endangered Species Act prohibits hunting and trapping, but more management is needed to sustain populations. Human development and recreation activities have caused wolverines to disperse from its nature range. Using habitat preservation techniques on current and historical wolverine habitat, increase availability and connectivity will improve dispersal. Close relationship with state officials will provide protection regarding land use, recreation, hunting, trapping and harassment. Public education will teach residents ways they can help prevent wolverine populations from further decline. Extensive research and population monitoring are needed due to the currently declining populations and the low fecundity of the species.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Biology, Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2013
Authors: Danielle E. Ball

Wellness Spas: A market analysis of the services a wellness spa could offer to middle class community members in a small New England town.

Mon, 04/22/2013 - 21:50
Abstract: Wellness spas, traditionally offered as a high end luxury model, are transitioning into a service available to all classes. There are services, within a certain price bracket, a wellness spa could offer to middle class community members of a small New England town. To be successful though, proprietors will need to better understand what services would be of interest to community members of a town like Keene, New Hampshire. The purpose of this study was to determine what wellness spa services would be of interest to those community members. Community members who qualify were given surveys to determine which services they would be most likely to use. The data was summarized to determine the most successful services according to the participants. This data can help indicate if there is a market in the area, and what the community members would be interested and not interested in.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies, Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2013
Authors: Danielle Taylor

The Utilization of Preservation Techniques in Restaurants: A study of consumer perception on the availability of preserved local products during off-seasons in restaurants

Mon, 04/22/2013 - 21:59
Abstract: The availability of local food has an impact on a consumer’s restaurant choice. Restaurants could generate additional income by providing locally grown food during off seasons. Restaurateurs could generate income by attracting guests that are interested in consuming locally grown foods, by providing them in their restaurant during the off-season. The purpose of this study is to determine to what extent in-house preservation of local products would benefit restaurants. This is a qualitative, exploratory relationship study, focused on how and to what extent the availability of preserved local products will affect a consumer’s selection of a restaurant. Data was collected through the administration of surveys to residents of Suffolk County, New York. The participants were asked their opinion on the ideas of preserved local food, and the role it plays in their dining choices. Data from the surveys was coded, based upon common responses, to analyze the participant feedback. These coded responses were compiled to present the findings. This study is helpful to people looking into opening a restaurant, and current owners of restaurants, by determining if the year-round offering of local products has financial benefit to their business.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Preston Hulse

Sustainable Foie Gras: A study of sustainable and ethical methods in raising geese and ducks for foie gras

Mon, 04/22/2013 - 17:14
Abstract: Foie gras has been a culinary delicacy worldwide for thousands of years and is currently in danger due to controversy surrounding the methods which are used to produce it. Conventional waterfowl care methods are gradually being deemed inhumane and unethical at farms worldwide and as a result bans and laws against foie gras production are being formed. Foie gras is the fatty enlarged liver of a duck or goose, conventionally created by means of “gavage” or force feeding the birds by placing a funnel into the bird’s mouth two to four times per day and pouring corn directly into the throat. Alternatively, one unique farm in Spain plants a garden full of edible goods for the birds and when the cold season arrives the birds naturally choose to force feed themselves. The end result is a foie gras that has won blind taste tests in France against major conventional producers. This method is not known to be used anywhere else in the world, but is being experimented with on a farm in Pocantico Hills, NY (South-Eastern New York) at the Stone Barns Center. If successfully executed, this method could be implemented on any farm as an alternative to conventional methods.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Capstone.doc
Authors: Dana Gagne

Organic vs. Inorganic- Perceptions A Study of the Perceived Flavor Differences between Organically and Inorganically Produced Foods Based on the Label “Organic”

Mon, 04/22/2013 - 11:43
Abstract: This research project is a study based on ideas of Jenny Wan-chen Lee and Mitsuru Shimizu’s study (You Taste What You See: Do Organic Labels Bias Taste Perceptions?) This study was specifically focused on culinary students to see if they would be more or less influenced by the label “organic.” It is also a psychological food study on the label organic and the way that such claims affect the consumer’s view on the quality of the product, specifically culinary students. This is done through a blind taste testing study where 24 culinary students and 24 non-culinary students were asked to try same product, but were told that one of the two unlabeled products was “organic” and the other “inorganic.” This study also goes into the qualifications a product must meet in order to be considered USDA certified organic. However, there is a pre-conceived notion that organic food equals a higher quality flavor and the purpose of this study is to see if that pre-conceived notion will affect the way these students can identify differences between two products when they are the same product. The hypothesis is that the culinary students will be less influenced by the label and judge the flavors more critically than those who are untrained in the culinary field.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Thomas Stile

Managing Raccoon (Procyon lotor) Populations in Urban Environments of New York State

Mon, 05/06/2013 - 17:29
Abstract: With the human population growing over time, so has the amount of urban and suburban populations. Urban areas have fragmented the landscape that can attract wild populations into the urban areas. One of these species that has been attracted includes the raccoon (Procyon lotor). In urban areas where resources are abundant, raccoon densities can become very high and they can become very destructive to homes. They are destructive to homes because of their generalist foraging habits and creation of den sites in human’s homes. Raccoons can be particularly dangerous in the spread of epizootics such as rabies, canine distemper, and roundworm. With raccoons in high densities the spread of the epizootics becomes very easy between raccoons which can cause a higher transmission rate to domestic animals or humans. Since population reduction methods have proven to be ineffective in reducing raccoon populations, education to the public to reduce the densities of raccoons may be the most effective. Proper management in maintaining public facilities, feeding wild and domestic animals outdoors, along with precautionary measures to take with your home can help in reducing the amount of negative interactions with raccoons. Also using current or past DEC or animal control data can help determine areas of highest negative interactions with the public to prevent future incidences in occurring.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2013
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Scott M. Collins

Providing youth sportsmen and disabled veterans with designated hunting areas through the enactment of the New York State eastern cottontail management plan

Thu, 05/02/2013 - 14:26
Abstract: The eastern cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus) is considered to be one of the most widely distributed cottontail in North America and one of the most popular game animals within the United States. Millions of hours each year are spent hunting cottontails as a recreational sport. While there are designated hunting areas for youth sportsmen and disabled veterans for other game species of New York State such as the ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), there are no such designated hunting areas designed specifically for eastern cottontails. Through cooperation of stakeholders such as private land owners and the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), we aim to establish designated hunting areas specifically for youth sportsmen and disabled veterans to provide them with the opportunity of enjoying recreational hunting and the enjoyment of the great outdoors for present and future generations of New York State.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2013
Authors: Cory Douglass

Current Status and Management Plan for the Little Brown Bat (Myotis lucifugus) to Manage White-nose Syndrome in Northeast North America

Thu, 05/02/2013 - 11:29
Abstract: Bats are an important part of many ecosystems, and provide numerous benefits to humans, including saving the agricultural industry billions of dollars a year. The little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) is the most numerous and widespread species of bat in North America, and in northeast North America, their populations have been decimated by a disease known as white-nose syndrome. White-nose syndrome is caused by a cold loving fungus and causes infected bats to arouse early from hibernation and use up critical fat reserves. The goal of this management plan is to increase and maintain the population of little brown bats to a sustainable level to prevent regional extirpation and range-wide extinction of the species through; increasing protection and regulation, researching white-nose syndrome more, and educating people about bats and white-nose syndrome. If nothing is done, little brown bats face regional extirpation, if not range-wide extinction.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2013
Authors: Jeremy Chamberlain

Increasing American Marten (Martes americana) Populations in New York State for Increased Fur Harvest Opportunity

Thu, 05/02/2013 - 11:29
Abstract: American Marten (Martes americana) can be found throughout the Northern portion of North America including Alaska and almost all of Canada (Figure 1) (Buskirk and Ruggerio 1994). They are only found within the Adirondack Mountains in New York with the densest populations being in the High Peaks Wilderness area, Five Ponds Wilderness area, and the Pigeon Lake Wilderness area (NYSDEC 2013). Figure 3 shows the areas where marten can be harvested during the specified trapping season (October 25- Decemeber 10 yearly). Marten are a furbearing species in New York meaning they are eligible for harvest during regulatory trapping seasons mandated by the states department of environmental conservation. Marten are protected by Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) meaning they are viewed on an international scale to protect them on a federal level and to manage the trade of there valuable pelt/furs. The goal of the marten management plan in New York is to increase population numbers so that eligible trappers may be able to harvest such an elusive species on a more frequent basis, while still limiting the number they are able to harvest yearly to prevent possible extirpation. Increasing marten populations is largely based on enough suitable habitats to sustain viable populations. Actions to achieve the goal are to restore habitats to the needs of martens along with creating corridors to areas with suitable habitats to increase the overall range they are found throughout. Live trapping and relocation may be necessary to create viable populations in areas with existing suitable habitat. These techniques will be used starting in 2013 and continue for 10 years reassess after those ten years more analysis will be done to see if the plan was a success.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2013
Authors: Ryan Kelley

Determining Habitat Suitability for Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) in Five Forest Harvest Method Plots on the Paul Smith’s Visitors Interpretation Center Land to Promote Long Term Suitable Habitat.

Sun, 04/28/2013 - 11:42
Abstract: Ruffed grouse (Bonansa umbellus) populations are in a steady decline due to the loss of early successional forests. Our study focused on the suitability of ruffed grouse habitat which is considered an area with adequate food and cover in. We used a habitat suitability index designed for ruffed grouse in Colorado that included average height of woody stems, percent conifers, density of mature yellow birch, and total equivalent stem density as the variables that indicate whether an area has suitable cover and food for ruffed grouse. Using the habitat suitability index we measured the vegetation in five forest harvest methods including: single tree selection, two-age cut, shelter-wood cut, clear-cut, and a control plot to determine if a habitat suitability index developed in Colorado can be used to assess habitat suitability for ruffed grouse in New York. These plots are located in the Adirondacks in Northern New York State at the Paul Smith’s College Visitors Interpretation Center (VIC). Our results suggested that 14 years after harvest a single tree selection harvest method has the highest overall habitat suitability (0.95) for ruffed grouse. This is different from other studies we found that indicated clear-cut was the most suitable forest harvest method for ruffed grouse. We also projected the change in habitat suitability for height of woody stems over time for the clear-cut based on the yearly growth rate of 0.656 feet. Based on our findings from the study we made recommendations to land owners and land managers to develop and promote short term and long term suitable habitat for ruffed grouse. These recommendations included using a variety of forestry practices that included: single tree selection, shelterwood, and clear-cut because ruffed grouse require a variety of different cover types and habitat over their lifetime.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Final_Draft.doc
Authors: Jeremy Anna, Jake Baulch