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Capstone Projects

Garlic

Fri, 05/03/2019 - 13:48
Abstract: Research and Capstone dinner about garlic.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2019
Authors: Alan Cary

Global Cuisine; Italy

Vermont VS Canadian, A study of the differences between Vermont and Canadian syrup

Thu, 04/24/2014 - 20:07
Abstract: The research question for this capstone is one that I have long pondered. Can someone taste the difference between Vermont and Canadian syrup? The inspiration to use this as my capstone question came on the first day of class when chef Pino gave us an example of a capstone question, it was “Can you tell the difference between grade A light maple syrup and grade B?” upon hearing this I decided to use this capstone as a chance to test my long standing theories. As the question implies the menu uses entirely maple syrup based dishes with an even balance between the two types. There are two chicken based dishes that were used for the tasting. By using two identical dishes I hoped to better allow the tasters to make the call as to whether or not the two syrups are noticeably different. The menu also includes pork, beef and a pasta dish that all feature Maple syrup or sugar as a major part of the recipe. The questions to the patrons are designed to tell me if people could taste any difference between the two dishes and if there was any reasons other than the maple flavor that could have accounted for this. Also, if they could taste a difference between the two plates, could they distinguish which one is from where?
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Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Ryan Gingras

Grass Fed vs. Grain Fed Beef

Fri, 04/25/2014 - 08:29
Abstract: Popular in the media today are chefs that boast only the best ingredients, but can the consumer even tell? The question being tested is this, can the average American taste the difference between grass fed beef and commercial beef, with the grass fed being more expensive? This concept is beneficial to explore for two main reasons. Number one, if there is a noticeable difference; culinary professionals will want to use the best ingredients they can find because people can taste the quality. Number two, if the guest can’t tell the difference between two cuts of meat that vary significantly in price, why would chefs waste money on it? To test this theory I will be providing a sample of plates with same cut of beef however one raised on grass and the other on corn and grain. There will be a simple and short survey asking the guest to vote on their favorite dish and why they liked it. With this information, gathered from random people with varying age and gender, it will provide evidence for or against the use of grass fed beef in our restaurants today.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Brandon Horner

Subtle Differences

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 19:41
Abstract: Our sense of smell and taste work together to allow us to taste and differentiate between different flavors in food. This study was designed to determine the effects of introducing aromatics during the dining experience. Can aromatics change the customer's perception of the flavors or ingredients in a dish? The method used to gather data for the study was a tasting consisting of ten taste panelists. Guest panelists were kept unaware of what the topic was until after the tasting was finished. The two plates in the first course, as well as the second course, were identically prepared so that an aroma could be introduced during the second tasting of the two courses. Each taste panelist received a tasting card containing suggestive statements regarding the texture, flavor, creativity, quality, and professionalism of the dishes presented. Based on a five level Likert-type scale, the tasting card statements required the panelists to circle numbers corresponding to what level they agreed or disagreed with each statement. The final question asked the panelists to choose what the most apparent difference was between the two dishes of each course. In both courses, flavor and ingredient were the options predominately chosen as the most apparent differences.
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Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Alyssa Fredericks

Event Planning and What It Takes

Wed, 04/30/2014 - 21:03
Abstract: The focus of this capstone was event planning. What goes into planning an event? A professional planner needs to think about the goals, the needs of the customer, type of event, food and beverage, facilities and risk. To plan and execute an event, one must determine the type. For example, is it a corporate meeting or fundraising function? A budget is needed for each event to understand what is affordable and what can be done. What type of risk is involved? A good planner needs to plan for the “what ifs” of an event. Technology has changed the event industry. There once was a time when guests of an event would be asked to turn off their cell phones. Now everyone uses their phones at events. People can Tweet live and use social media to increase the experience of events. Planners can use social media to boost their marketing as well. Once a planner has experience in the industry they can apply to become a Certified Meeting Planner or a Certified Special Events Professional. This certification shows that the planner is an expert in their field. This capstone was planning a business plan workshop at Paul Smith’s College. This event was designed to give students a chance to develop a business plan. Potential transfer students were invited to take part in the event. During the event the students had to create a new product to market along with current senior business students who acted as their mentors. Together, they came up with a business plan and had to give an elevator speech on the product to everyone. The winning team was chosen based on the marketing, taste and idea of the product. The event was considered a success by the visitors and the college.
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Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management, Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Stephanie Dalaba

Is it possible to enhance classical Serbian cuisine by modernizing it?

Thu, 05/08/2014 - 14:05
Abstract: The research will cover the history of Serbian cuisine, how it changed during times, and in what direction could it possibly go. The starting point will be history, in order to understand what food is typically found and grown in the area, but also to discover what influences occurred during wars and migrations, and how the culture adapted to new ingredients and new cooking methods. Eventually the menu will be chosen and 5 classical Serbian dishes will be transformed. The modernized dish will have identical ingredients as the classic one but the cooking methods and the combination of flavors or texture might differ. The panel would be presented with a classical and a modern version of the chosen dish and they would be asked for their preference. The main focus of this research is not to substitute the classical dishes in any way, instead the goal is to improve them.
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Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Marko Lalosevic

Perception Connection - Defining Local Food, and the Gap Between Chefs and Consumers

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 11:01
Abstract: With increasing numbers of restaurants using the word “local” on their menus, and consumers seeking out farmers markets and purveyors who label their products as local, it has become necessary to take a closer look at just what is being talked about. When a chef puts the word local next to his featured dish of the day, what does that mean to him? Conversely, what does a customer reading that menu expect to be getting on their plate? Currently, there are no government regulations for the use of the “local” description, unlike “organic” and “all-natural” foods. Since there are no legal expectations, it is at the discretion of the chefs to decide how they will market certain items, and in the minds of the consumers what they expect to be consuming based upon an image. This capstone will explore, through the use of surveys, distributed to both culinary professionals, and culinary consumers, what their expectations of a locally sourced food item are. The results of these queries will demonstrate whether there is a gap between the two facets. The project does not seek to establish a basis for regulation, but rather to explore the ideals of two symbiotic groups. The conclusions based upon what this project discovers will educate both chefs and consumers on commonly accepted standards in local food. It will also offer them the opportunity to evaluate any gaps between standards, and decide how they might approach using or buying “local” food. 
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Capstone project.docx
Authors: Kelcey Rusch

Cornopoly A Study of a Cost Effective and Corn-free Menu

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 11:50
Abstract: In the past ten years the price of corn has quadrupled as the result of the increasing demand for corn. Today, there are wide ranges of items being produced that include corn as an essential ingredient. This project looked into developing ways to help food service establishments to remain cost effective despite the increased price of corn and thus corn derived products. For this project we held a blind taste test meal to find consumer preference. During the meal we supplied questionnaires to collect data on preferences. We found that the price of corn had not reached a high enough point to force a change to non-corn derived products; however, we felt that through statistical forecasting, the price of corn would rise to a point that would not allow restaurants to remain cost effective.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Final Capstone Paper.doc
Authors: Jeffrey Dineen, Matthew Cusimano

Self-Actualization through the use of food

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 12:19
Abstract: Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs is a table consisting of human needs according to necessity; in order to reach a new level, needs of the previous level must be met first. Among the physiological needs located at the bottom of the pyramid, is food. Food can be controlled unlike other biological needs and therefore may play a crucial role in reaching the ultimate goal of self-actualization. The purpose of this capstone is to show how food can go beyond the need of hunger, and bring us to a self-actualizing moment. The surveys will be conducted to gather statistics and opinions of outdoor recreationists and other relevant professionals such as chefs and culinary students. The question that is going to be answered through this capstone is: Is food preparation and consumption an enriching and exciting enough experience to achieve self-actualization? The results should vary between the two populations, but the ultimate prediction is that food will be shown to be a major factor in the achievement of self-actualization. The significance of this study is to reach a new level of understanding about the importance of food to the human body, and show that food can bring that self-actualizing moment without meeting all the other needs of the pyramid beforehand.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Stephanie Curtis